#1
If you play them for a year or so, then play on a better guitar, you will sound a lot better, since the bad setup makes you press down harder, thus strengthening your fingers for good guitars. At least that is how I felt when touching a MiM strat.
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#2
But it's the hassle of feeling like your guitar is holding you back. I actually like bad guitars now, because I like makin them play better and sound good. It's sort of satisfying.
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#3
Well badly set up guitars may not feel as good as a well set up one, so naturally people would dislike them. That's why they're called "badly" setup rather than setup "differently."
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#4
Quote by Kurapica
But it's the hassle of feeling like your guitar is holding you back.

+1 _I_ want to be the one holding me back, not my guitar.
02 MiM Telecaster-----\__Digitech Whammy__TS-10__535q__DE-7__6505+ 112
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#5
Quote by SecretAgentS
If you play them for a year or so, then play on a better guitar, you will sound a lot better, since the bad setup makes you press down harder, thus strengthening your fingers for good guitars. At least that is how I felt when touching a MiM strat.



That's an interesting point. There is a huge difference between a MiM strat and say a Les Paul Studio. I enjoy it, every time I go to guitar center and pick one of the nice guitars I play much better than I do at home. Of course it would be nice to sound like that all the time, but not all of us have the money.
#6
Quote by jeffc313
+1 _I_ want to be the one holding me back, not my guitar.

You do know there's an underline formatting post feature...right?

Anyway, I agree. That's pretty much the whole thing from my POV.
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#7
Quote by Junnage
You do know there's an underline formatting post feature...right?

_wait_wat?__
#8
fair point, but personally, i'd rather not fight with my guitar to get the sound i want out of it.

if i want to strengthen my fingers i'll play an acoustic.
#9
Quote by Kurapica
But it's the hassle of feeling like your guitar is holding you back. I actually like bad guitars now, because I like makin them play better and sound good. It's sort of satisfying.


+1, trying to learn on a crappy, poorly set-up, poor-sounding starter guitar can sometimes make it even more frustrating to learn.
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#11
^Perhaps.

I like to play guitars. Period. I own nice ones, but I could care less whats lurking around. I'll play the hellp kitty squier if thats all they got.

If the price is right, Id buy about any damn guitar.
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#12
i think it's more likely that you'll quit if you start with an awful guitar. the chances aren't to good that you'll end up being awesome when you switch to a newer and better guitar. you'll just end up quitting way before that. the "this isn't nearly fun enough to keep doing" sort of a deal.
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#13
I can't figure out why people dislike badly setup beginner guitars

The reasons are in bold.

I mean, badly set up isn't too bad. Generally you can fix it with ten minutes of adjustments and MAYBE a few hours for truss rod adjustment time. It could, of course, go into a new fretting job, or possibly new neck, maybe even hardware. That stuff can get messy.

Now for the beginner part. Really, who likes playing AND PREFERS their beginner guitar over their mid-high level guitar? My Epi LP Special II is nothing compared to my Washburn, so how could I like it? Sure, sometimes its fun to play, to get back into my roots and to try the different neck profiles out, but really, no one prefers they're beginner guitar over their better guitar, unless they failed to get a better guitar that works for them.

Hope that last part makes sense. I kind of rambled a bit. :/


EDIT: Also, I can't understand how people can't figure it out, that maybe people have different taste than them.
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Last edited by Baby Joel at Aug 12, 2009,
#14
As the owner of two badly set up beginner guitars (Squier Affinity HSS Strat and Epi LP Standard*), I can safely say the only genuinely positive thing you can say about them is they were cheap enough for a beginner like me to buy without feeling I might waste a load of money if I really didn't get on with guitar in general.

The bad setups (the Strat's not bad after a lot of effort, the Epi you can just forget) thoroughly irritate me because, given where they're manufactured, and the labour costs in those areas, both probably needed very little effort from someone who vaguely knew what they were doing to have them leave the factory in much, much better shape.

What's more, the manufacturers can get away with it because of who they're selling to. For all the "try before you buy advice" we see, there's just no way a player who's just starting out can actually pick up the problems for themselves. I, for example, was in no position to spot the issues with either guitar when I bought them. Sure, now I can pick up a guitar at the shop and make a fairly reasonable assessment of for myself, but back then I had so little idea as to what I was doing as to make that impossible. In short, beginner guitars can only get away with it in the first place because of the target audience, not because of the price itself.


* Setup aside, someone at Epiphone needs to go run the parts room, correct the labelling on the boxes, then fire the joker who swapped the labels on the "Fret Wire" and "Boiled Rice Noodle" boxes. Yeah, I like noodles, but they're just too soft to use as frets.
Oh, now I've gone and spilled my tea. This really won't do at all.
#15
A badly setup guitar is something that really can hold you back. I'm a guy who really likes to have high action, but on many beginner guitars you have high actio because it's the only way to avoid fret buzz. Then it's a bad thing, because the guitar limits you. And a lot of them has a problem intonating and so on. But really often a badly setup beginner guitar is because they want to hide things like fret buzz and then it's a way of tricking you.
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#16
easy get a badly setup guitar, setup

regardless of what guitar it is i`ve played some really expensive guitars that have been badly setup ande i`ve played some ridiculously cheap guitars that have been properly setup, and how to have a guitar setup is personal preference.
#17
First of all; a MiM Strat isn't THAT bad. That aside, why wouldn't everyone hate a bad guitar? They're fine for beginners to start on, mainly due to their low price, but more advanced players ofcourse like to play on better instruments. Makes perfect sense, no?
Play the music, not the instrument.
#19
I started out with two badly set up beginner guitars. I quickly learned how to set them up the way I liked them. I played with the truss rod and the string level until I figured it out (of course with the assistance of both hard copy and online instructions). Then I installed new pick-ups. I managed to do it without burning my hands and got it right the first time without spilling solder all over the place (I had an instructional video from Stew-Mac). If I had a $2000 Gibson, I'd have been afraid to touch it and would have never learned.
#20
Quote by SecretAgentS
If you play them for a year or so, then play on a better guitar, you will sound a lot better, since the bad setup makes you press down harder, thus strengthening your fingers for good guitars. At least that is how I felt when touching a MiM strat.

if you press down too hard, your fretted notes become sharp.

also, a well set up entry level guitar can be quite nice actually. so why leave it playing like crap when you can make it better?
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#21
Playing a badly set up guitar will cause bad habits; fretting notes so that the note gets higher, lifting fingers too far off the fretboard, getting used to bad intonation so that you can't tell if it's good or bad on later guitars, and so on and so forth.

If I had the chance, I would've started on a proper expensive guitar, but I couldn't, so yeah.
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