#1
How would I solo over these chords?

D5, Eb5, Gb5, F5

I know i could just use the corresponding scales, but they are half notes so it would be kind of hard to do that.

Also how would I know what Key this is in?
#2
I would recommend you watch Marty Friedman's video "Melodic Control". I think it's still up on Google Video. It has a lot of stuff that will answer your question very thoroughly. But as I imagine you want a shorter answer, I would recommend you play the corresponding minor key over each chord. However, those chords are too close together to achieve consonance (that is, they won't sound very pretty being played in that order).
#3
Quote by Geldin
I would recommend you watch Marty Friedman's video "Melodic Control". I think it's still up on Google Video. It has a lot of stuff that will answer your question very thoroughly. But as I imagine you want a shorter answer, I would recommend you play the corresponding minor key over each chord. However, those chords are too close together to achieve consonance (that is, they won't sound very pretty being played in that order).


What do you mean their to close together?
#4
Find out how the notes relate to one another.

Eb to D is a major 7th. Eb to F is a major second. Eb to Gb is a minor third.

One type of scale that has a major second, minor third, and major 7th is the harmonic minor scale, so, you might be in Eb harmonic minor... Eb, F, Gb, Ab, Bb, Cb, D. (Eb, F, F#, G#, Bb, B, D). Try soloing with those notes.
Quote by CrunchyRoll
So you would censor child porn.

This thread is so fukking fail.
#5
You'll have to refer us to the actual song if you want to know the key dude. Those 5th chords are only parts of other chords.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#6
Quote by Erick vonZipper
Find out how the notes relate to one another.

Eb to D is a major 7th. Eb to F is a major second. Eb to Gb is a minor third.

One type of scale that has a major second, minor third, and major 7th is the harmonic minor scale, so, you might be in Eb harmonic minor... Eb, F, Gb, Ab, Bb, Cb, D. (Eb, F, F#, G#, Bb, B, D). Try soloing with those notes.


Thank you that helps out alot, how would I find out myself that Eb to D is a Major 7th and Eb to F if Major Second and so on?
#7
Quote by AlanHB
You'll have to refer us to the actual song if you want to know the key dude. Those 5th chords are only parts of other chords.


The roots of the power chords can generally tell you what key it's in. If you had an A5, E5, C5, B5 progression it wouldn't be impossible to tell the key.
Quote by CrunchyRoll
So you would censor child porn.

This thread is so fukking fail.
#8
Quote by AlanHB
You'll have to refer us to the actual song if you want to know the key dude. Those 5th chords are only parts of other chords.


I'm trying to make my own solo so I just did some simple chords that I though sounded decent and I want to make a solo over that.
#9
Quote by Blckspawn
What do you mean their to close together?
He means that there are four chords whose tonal centers are within a major 3rd of each other. In other words, those chords don't have much harmonic value together.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Aug 11, 2009,
#10
Quote by Blckspawn
I'm trying to make my own solo so I just did some simple chords that I though sounded decent and I want to make a solo over that.


If you just thought up the chords without figuring out the scale or key used, then just use your ear and figure out what notes go well over it. Your ear is your best tool. If you're looking for a more technical approach, brush up on your theory. You can check out the crusades or other articles on here about music theory.
#11
Quote by Blckspawn
Thank you that helps out alot, how would I find out myself that Eb to D is a Major 7th and Eb to F if Major Second and so on?


Something like this...

A Bb B C C# D Eb E F F# G G#.

A distance of one(up) note is a minor second.
Two notes is a major second.
Three is a minor third.
Four is a major third.
Five is a perfect fourth.
Six is an augmented fourth or diminished fifth.
Seven is a perfect fifth.
Eight is a minor sixth.
Nine is a major sixth.
Ten is a minor seventh.
Eleven is a major seventh.

Then you need to know the scale formulas to determine all the other notes.
Quote by CrunchyRoll
So you would censor child porn.

This thread is so fukking fail.
#12
Also, if you're planning on going about writing your own solo at your level of knowledge, try a more consonant chord progression, like a I IV V.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#13
Quote by Erick vonZipper
Something like this...

A Bb B C C# D Eb E F F# G G#.

A distance of one(up) note is a minor second.
Two notes is a major second.
Three is a minor third.
Four is a major third.
Five is a perfect fourth.
Six is an augmented fourth or diminished fifth.
Seven is a perfect fifth.
Eight is a minor sixth.
Nine is a major sixth.
Ten is a minor seventh.
Eleven is a major seventh.

Then you need to know the scale formulas to determine all the other notes.


ooooohhhh ok. I got it now. Thanks.

Now how did you figure that it it was an Eb Harmonic Minor?
#14
Quote by food1010
Also, if you're planning on going about writing your own solo at your level of knowledge, try a more consonant chord progression, like a I IV V.


I think your right.
#15
Quote by Blckspawn
Now how did you figure that it it was an Eb Harmonic Minor?



You need to know scale formulas.
Quote by CrunchyRoll
So you would censor child porn.

This thread is so fukking fail.
#16
Quote by Erick vonZipper
You need to know scale formulas.


Could you tell me where I could find those?
#17
Quote by Blckspawn
Could you tell me where I could find those?


Ultimate Guitar does have a lessons section on the main site, you know. <_<
#18
Quote by Erick vonZipper
The roots of the power chords can generally tell you what key it's in. If you had an A5, E5, C5, B5 progression it wouldn't be impossible to tell the key.


Oh sure, but you could have a progression in the key of A minor or E minor with those chords for example.

But I wasn't even thinking about the harmonic minor when I looked at the proposed chords - that's clever whoever figured that out.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#19
Quote by AlanHB
Oh sure, but you could have a progression in the key of A minor or E minor with those chords for example.

But I wasn't even thinking about the harmonic minor when I looked at the proposed chords - that's clever whoever figured that out.


Yes, but theory aside, you could tell which key was implied more if you were actually playing it, instead of looking at the names of a few notes on a screen =P
Quote by CrunchyRoll
So you would censor child porn.

This thread is so fukking fail.
#20
Quote by AlanHB
You'll have to refer us to the actual song if you want to know the key dude. Those 5th chords are only parts of other chords.


Quote by Erick vonZipper
The roots of the power chords can generally tell you what key it's in. If you had an A5, E5, C5, B5 progression it wouldn't be impossible to tell the key.


Quote by AlanHB
Oh sure, but you could have a progression in the key of A minor or E minor with those chords for example.

But I wasn't even thinking about the harmonic minor when I looked at the proposed chords - that's clever whoever figured that out.


Quote by Erick vonZipper
Yes, but theory aside, you could tell which key was implied more if you were actually playing it, instead of looking at the names of a few notes on a screen =P


This is a circular conversation
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#21
Well thanks for awnsering all of my questions. Now the only think that I have to do is practice my scales.
#22
I agree with FallsDownStairs, if there is no key really then it's more about what fits when you hear it. Happens a lot when a musical idiot tries to write a melody line for your solo.
&*&*))&%#$%$ hate that.....