#1
Set your metronome to 60 bpm. Play 60 of the same note, each note in time with the click of the metronome. Record yourself and notice how many you actually miss
#2
I'm not gonna lie, that sounds like a pretty useless exercise.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#3
Quote by food1010
I'm not gonna lie, that sounds like a pretty useless exercise.

i second that
#4
Quote by food1010
I'm not gonna lie, that sounds like a pretty useless exercise.


Did you try it?

Cause unless youve tried it, gtfo. Its a lot more difficult than you think
#5
I tried it, not that hard. If we're talking something faster, like downpicking 200 bpm then I could see the challenge.
#6
Quote by pwrmax
I tried it, not that hard.


Did you record yourself and listen back?

I think youll probably find your not as on the beat as you think
#7
Quote by food1010
I'm not gonna lie, that sounds like a pretty useless exercise.



it sounds useless but i agree with ts. it's a really good exercise. my guitar teacher in college makes me do that in our lessons every once and a while just to see how accurate i am. it also helps improve your tone as well when playing classical
#8
Quote by tubatom868686
Did you record yourself and listen back?

I think youll probably find your not as on the beat as you think

I'm on the beat, not that hard. Then again, I'm a jazz bassist and if I can't do it at 60 then I'd be terrible.
#9
Quote by pwrmax
I'm on the beat, not that hard. Then again, I'm a jazz bassist and if I can't do it at 60 then I'd be terrible.


Im a jazz bassist as well, and admittedly, after working with a metronome daily its not that bad. But I was surprised when I gave it to a couple of my students. Not one of them could stay right on the beat.
#10
i think the hardest part of this exercise would be to sit through and play all 60 notes at 60 bpm.
sex, drugs, and rock and roll have turned into aids, needles, and techno..
#11
Ok, once we've done that and confirmed that we have shocking timing (I haven't done it yet, but I know for a fact I would be off the beat for a chunk of notes, and I don't have bad timing compared to a lot of people) what do you recommend doing to improve our timing? Like, any specific exercises or just practice with a metronome lots?
#12
Quote by food1010
I'm not gonna lie, that sounds like a pretty useless exercise.

It's not. It's great for getting your timing perfect. Besides, you should try it, you'll be surprised how crappy you actually are at it.

TS,
Old excersize is old.
#13
Quote by fli.pansy
i think the hardest part of this exercise would be to sit through and play all 60 notes at 60 bpm.

it'd take exactly one minute
not that long

and having played music for over 14 years, on piano and guitar, I'd be really horrible if I couldn't even do this.
#14
i do for that, except 90 notes at 30 bpm.

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
#15
It should be harder at less than 60bpm, than at a high tempo, coz there's a bigger gap between and that makes it harder to keep time. This is a useful timing exercise that I do often, set it up so that if I play in perfect time I can't hear the metronome, and if I'm out, then I'll hear it click
#16
at everyone who thinks this is stupid and easy.

This isn't supposed to be some groundbreaking exercise. It's to show you that even an 60bpm, a lot of people can't hit exactly on the beat every time. At slow tempos like that, precision is key, so you have to be right on.
#17
Quote by timeconsumer09
at everyone who thinks this is stupid and easy.

This isn't supposed to be some groundbreaking exercise. It's to show you that even an 60bpm, a lot of people can't hit exactly on the beat every time. At slow tempos like that, precision is key, so you have to be right on.

True, last semester my school's jazz ensemble played "Duke Ellington's Sound of Love" by Charles Mingus. For those of you that aren't familiar with it, it's a swing ... at 58 bpm if I recall correctly. Playing a walking bassline to that seemed like something really easy when I first looked at it but it was one of the hardest songs for me to play accurately, second only to "Moanin'" by Mingus which was at 212 bpm.

Unfortunately, comfortable tempos aren't very common in jazz since they would normally sound terrible.
#18
I actually pretty much nailed it.

Which is weird since I've been told my timing is off a couple of times (not just from latency when recording, I mean performing for real.

Well, not that my timing is off, but that I tend to get a little too into the song sometimes and speed it up..

In a band situation I'm right on though, oddly enough.

But yeah, nailed this exercise.
#19
I find it a lot harder to make slow ballads sound hip and good than any blazing bebop song they count off.