#1
My band has been around for a while, and is fairly well known within our school, however we've yet to play a paying show. We're about to start, and I'm going to try and increase the crowd size by bringing in more bands. Right now the number would be 4 bands total. All local, not huge, few shows between us. For future shows, how many bands would you guys recommend I include (since I'm organizing everything) so that the optimal crowd is drawn but our band is given enough attention so that people remember us?
#2
Most local shows I attend have 3 to 5 bands. I suppose that anywhere around that gives enough time for each band, without being too much.
#3
I'd say 3 or 4 would be best for un known bands. Just make your band the last one to play so it seems like you guys are the best. If you've got the stamina, you could be the first band to play, then the last aswell
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#5
3 should be good; and opening act, main band, and closer.

Just try not to make it boring (take too much time setting up/changing gear, etc...)
#6
Put the biggest act last. If you put them first, the audience will diminish afterwards, thus ruining it for the other bands. Make sure you have equipment ready to go, so that the wait in between sets is to a minimum. Also, I've always thought it would be cool to have everyone come back for a final song/jam.

3 bands is really good.
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#7
3 or 4 is solid, depending on how long you want sets to be and how late you/the venue want to go. The more bands that are playing the earlier you should start so you don't infringe on people's curfews (assuming it's a night show). Generally, I would try to start (as in the time the first band is finished setting up and ready to start) somewhere between 7 and 7:30 if four bands are playing and between 8 or 8:30 if there are three. If each band plays a 45 minute set and there are no major delays, you can finish by 11 or 11:30.
That being said though, venues can have crazy rules about set times and start times and other things like that so make sure when you book you get as many specifics as you can from the venue before you even get there so you what you're getting in to. As far as order goes, I would try to play somewhere in the middle because at that point everyone will have shown up already but it will be before people start leaving to do other things.

Hope that helps.
#8
Remember, it takes a suprising amount of time for 4 bands to soundcheck, and even to switch bands between sets always seems to take a while.

Things to think about:

You will *have* to pool drum kits, instruments, amps and gear to a greater or lesser extent. There just isn't time to take a drum kit apart and set up another one in the time you'll have to switch bands around. Whichever band has the best kit should probably donate it (of course, get the others to commit to replacing anything that gets damaged). Cymbals can be switched if a drummer is really petty, but I'd advise not even doing that.

Amps are more moveable - just put them all on stage and only plug one in at a time - but it's still an extra delay. Also remember that the audience can see you while bands are switching - you don't want to look like you're messing around, because they'll start to heckle. :P Again, I'd suggest using the best amp that any of the bands has.

Ask all the bands 'how many mikes do you want' early on - there's nothing more annoying than realising that one of them has three singers and that you've only got mikes enough for two.

Note that you're pretty much responsible for organising everything under this plan - if you don't take responsibility, nobody will, people will all discuss things separately, and it'll all go tits-up.
#9
4, maybe 5 bands, but id say 4 is plenty. That way you can all have a decently long set, and the crowd wont lose interest. And do the sound checks a couple of hours before the show, since you dont know how long it would take, so its good to have some leaveway.
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#10
4 bands is fine. Put the biggest band last.

Also, to minimize confusion/delays, talk to the other bands and see if any of them are willing to bring their amps to lend to the other bands. Or at least have a cab out on stage for bands to only have to use their heads. One drumkit is ideal too, which only a change in cymbals/snares between sets
#11
Quote by Samzawadi
Remember, it takes a suprising amount of time for 4 bands to soundcheck, and even to switch bands between sets always seems to take a while.

Things to think about:

You will *have* to pool drum kits, instruments, amps and gear to a greater or lesser extent. There just isn't time to take a drum kit apart and set up another one in the time you'll have to switch bands around. Whichever band has the best kit should probably donate it (of course, get the others to commit to replacing anything that gets damaged). Cymbals can be switched if a drummer is really petty, but I'd advise not even doing that.

Amps are more moveable - just put them all on stage and only plug one in at a time - but it's still an extra delay. Also remember that the audience can see you while bands are switching - you don't want to look like you're messing around, because they'll start to heckle. :P Again, I'd suggest using the best amp that any of the bands has.

Ask all the bands 'how many mikes do you want' early on - there's nothing more annoying than realising that one of them has three singers and that you've only got mikes enough for two.

Note that you're pretty much responsible for organising everything under this plan - if you don't take responsibility, nobody will, people will all discuss things separately, and it'll all go tits-up.


It is true, bands are gonna have to share drumkits. At least thats howwe have always done it. However, when it comes to amps, i would be slightly more skeptical. I always prefer to use my own amp, as i am used to it, and i know the settings i like, whereas trying to adjust to a new amp on the night can be pretty annoying. That said my amp is on casters, so it can literally just be rollled on and off stage, so perhaps i am being biased
#12
My band has played quite a few shows and its usually 4 bands, since all ages shows, which we play, are 5 to 9. That gives each band 45 minutes to play and 15 to set up. Everyone gets the same amount of time, unless its a tour show.
#13
Quote by bluesrocker101
Put the biggest act last. If you put them first, the audience will diminish afterwards, thus ruining it for the other bands. Make sure you have equipment ready to go, so that the wait in between sets is to a minimum. Also, I've always thought it would be cool to have everyone come back for a final song/jam.

3 bands is really good.


By the same logic, couldn't it also be possible that putting the best band last would cause the audience to disperse at the beginning, if the other two acts aren't thoroughly interesting? That could result in a smaller crowd for the final one.
Last edited by zephyrclaw at Aug 17, 2009,
#14

By the same logic, couldn't it also be possible that putting the best band last would cause the audience to disperse at the beginning, if the other two acts aren't thoroughly interesting. That could result in a smaller crowd for the final one.


Not quite - the problem tends to be that a fair few people only turn up for the band they want to hear. So if you put the biggest band first, then all their friends go, listen to that band, then leave. It could mean that the last band to play is only playing to three people. At least if the biggest one is last, then their fans are likely to turn up through the sets of the other groups, and each band will have a bigger audience than the one before them.
#15
i recently orginized one and we had 6 bands playing with a 20min set list each and was a good night
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#16
Quote by zephyrclaw
By the same logic, couldn't it also be possible that putting the best band last would cause the audience to disperse at the beginning, if the other two acts aren't thoroughly interesting. That could result in a smaller crowd for the final one.

Usually people wouldn't want to waste their money. If they paid to see the final act, they won't just leave cause they don't like the opening act, they would just wait outside or in the back.
#17
Ahh, right. I see now. I had assumed that it was one of those free events where there's a random stage in the middle of a local community festival or something and people in the audience are free to come and go as they please. I should read things more carefully next time, eh?
#18
My band is a Heavy Hardcore band and we play shows at clubs and things like that and usually there are bands that play like all day into the night. So in this instance there are like 9 bands performing. When we play at venues that are larger and made for shows there are usually about 6 bands or so. This gets alot of people there and it helps you spread your music. Depending on what type of music it is, will change the kind of show.
btw. we have about 20-30 minute sets and then we take about 10 minutes to set up the next band.