#1
How am I able to find the key center of a chord progression? I've searched all over but no site really comes to a resolution. What is the actual process?
#2
as in, determining the key given a progression?
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#4
Whichever chord feels like home is pretty right.

Play by ear.

Play this, C - G - Am - F - C.

See how the "C" chord feels like the piece has ended?

Well, there you go, key center.
#5
I've been improvising using the scale that sounds right over most of whatever a chord progression is and sliding into another scale for a chord that doesn't sound right and so on. But I would like to know the actualy theory and analysis that comes with determining the key of a chord progression.
#6
What sharps or flats are used in it is what determines it, theoretically, I believe.

For the key of C there are no sharps or flats, there can be sharps or flats in the song, but they will be accidentals (unless it modulates to a different key).

http://www.ezfolk.com/uke/Tutorials/1four5/music-theory/key-chord-chart/3-key-chord-chart.jpg

That basically has all the standard chords in each key.

Is this what you are after?
#8
Learn the major scale inside out, so you understand how its constructed in terms of notes (so you can recognise key sigs) and intervals, then learn to harmonise the scale by stacking thirds - that will enable you to construct diatonic chord progressions for major keys, and you'll start to be able to recognise major chord progressions. When you get two major chords next to each other (eg if your chord progression is C F C G C, FMaj and GMaj are next to each other), they are often the IV and V chords from the major scale.

Once you understand the Major scale learn how the natural minor scale is related to it, and you'll realise you can create chord scales for the minor scale already too.

Not all chord progressions will be diatonic though, so don't expect to be able to identify all of them easily.
#9
Quote by King Turi
Whichever chord feels like home is pretty right.

Play by ear.

Play this, C - G - Am - F - C.

See how the "C" chord feels like the piece has ended?

Well, there you go, key center.


I've always thought of it that way, with the initial chord of the progression being the key, but I'm sure someone once told me that that's not always the case.
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#10
That's not what I was trying to say though, it was what chord makes it feel like the piece has finished.

It just so happened that that chord was also the first chord.

More often than not, it's the last chord of a song which is the key, not the first.
#11
Quote by steve_muse
I've always thought of it that way, with the initial chord of the progression being the key, but I'm sure someone once told me that that's not always the case.


Never use the first chord as an indicator for the key. The chord the progression resolves to is the tonic. Look for cadences, they will give you a good indicator of the key.
#12
Ah I see. Yeah, I sort of know that, but cheers.
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