#1
Lately i've discovered chord tones. Every time i went improvising, i always stayed near the chord currently played. But I saw more advanced stuff on the internet. Like playing melodies but returning to the chord tone every time a new chord comes, or playing only 3rds or 5ths. Can you guys explain to me all the different ways to use chord tones to write melodies?
#2
This thread was shoved several pages back without any replies or views, so hopefully that is a legit reason to bump. If not, please tell me.
#3
My teacher was talking about chord tones this week - say your playing a 12 bar blues without a backing track, he said use the chord tones that aren't in the scale to imply the chord for the duration that the chord would be played for if you did have a backing. It sounds really cool when he does it.


Edit:
Say you're playing a blues in G using G minor pent, and the chords are GMaj, CMaj7 and D7, G min Pent is G Bb C D F

GMaj is G B D - so you'd bring out the B (Maj 3rd)
CMaj is C E G - so you'd bring out the E (6th)
DMaj is D F A - so you'd bring out the A (2nd)
Last edited by zhilla at Aug 12, 2009,
#4
Wouldn't G Minor Pentatonic sound a little odd over a G Major progression?

E Minor pentatonic would work better, right?

G Major pentatonic would work well also.
#5
Quote by King Turi
Wouldn't G Minor Pentatonic sound a little odd over a G Major progression?

E Minor pentatonic would work better, right?

G Major pentatonic would work well also.

Its blues so it works. He wrote it wrong, normally in blues you would use the I, IV and V as all dominant chords. The blues scale (minor pentatonic with a flat 5th added) giving a b3, b5, and b7th is what gives you that blues sound and tension. Of course you could also use the blues scale a minor third down (e blues scale) like you said, this could also be called a major pentatonic and would give you a different kind of sound.

EDIT: G major and E minor pentatonic are the exact same notes FYI.
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#6
Quote by guitarplaya322
Its blues so it works. He wrote it wrong, normally in blues you would use the I, IV and V as all dominant chords. The blues scale (minor pentatonic with a flat 5th added) giving a b3, b5, and b7th is what gives you that blues sound and tension. Of course you could also use the blues scale a minor third down (e blues scale) like you said, this could also be called a major pentatonic and would give you a different kind of sound.

EDIT: G major and E minor pentatonic are the exact same notes FYI.
Thanks - I didn't just write it wrong - I remembered it wrong. Cheers for putting me straight