#1
I'm kinda schizophrenic about this. I think it'd be cool to be able to sit down and just rip out 20nps but then it's not really a musical thing, more just impressive and fun. But I guess its just suitable for some songs, but you could just do some Jimmy Page style stuff that's not shred but has the same impact. I'm interested in some 'jazz-shred' like in the Carl Roa video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8wv9LfVNy4Y but the really shreddy parts of that are the least jazzy I'm interested in classic rock soloing and jazzy saxophone stuff like John Coltrane. Not really sure about putting hours and hours into a bag of tricks though. I've heard some people say that they grew out of shred.

Anyway maybe just give me some pros and cons to help me decide
#3
you should play what you want to play. who cares about the standards other people have made. also it'll make you technically proficient for jazz and other styles of music. jazz has worked the opposite for me. i've learned fast jazz standards and my shredding has slowly gotten better.
#5
Define music.

Shred is the result of good, efficient technique, which should be an aim regardless of whether you spend your time playing fast as **** or not.
Last edited by Tallman at Aug 12, 2009,
#6
Quote by MetalMusicianAl
you should play what you want to play. who cares about the standards other people have made. also it'll make you technically proficient for jazz and other styles of music. jazz has worked the opposite for me. i've learned fast jazz standards and my shredding has slowly gotten better.


yeah I'm trying to work out what I want to play, obviously I'd like to be able to play anything and everything but that's more of a long term thing than just in the next few years
#7
jazz tends to use a fair few very fast alternate picked chromatic scale runs, so id advise it and as you said, its impressive to outsiders :P
#8
theres probably no point in being that fast, because then no-one cares about your music; you simply have jealous people saying you suck because you better than them. yet at 12 - 18nps everyone thinks your a god

but if you can't see a time in your music where you would like to play fast then don't bother.

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
#9
I feel that nowadays theirs a certain stigma involved to playing fast on a guitar, that is not attached to violin playing e.t.c

I think the reason being is because of the term ''shred'' which is a term I think needs to be completely dropped.

I love listening to fast guitaring personally, but also slow, depends what mood and emotions I am feeling.

It can get too excessive however, just like being too slow can get excessive. Yngwie, Paul G, Steve Vai, Jeff loomis and Marty Friedman are the kinds of players who define fast solos that I enjoy listening too. Even Rusty Cooleys high speed sweeps sound awesome (except his betcha cant play this which sounds like ****)

Don't see playing fast on guitar as shred. See it as playing fast. Look at Pagganini (spelt that wrong I swear) AMAZING violinist, played very fast, never got called a violin shredder lol. The point i'm trying to make is just because something is fast doesn't mean it looses music credibility.

For example, On ''for the love of god'' when Steve Vai does the fast high speed ascending run and finishing on that high bend, or on "Far beyond the sun'' when it builds up to the bit where Yngwie Tremelo trem picks one note for a bit, then descends ultra speed upwards up the harmonic minor scale, or on "Tornado of Souls" when Marty builds up to the main lick of the solo, these are all moments of awesomeness that all just make you go ''oh yeah!'' They would NOT be that awesome if they were doing it slow. The best solos in my opinion start off slow then build up to speed.

The point i'm trying to make is, personally as a listener, I don't like to listen to slow emotional solos all day, and neither do I like to listen to ''shred'' all day, why does it have to be one or the other? Learn both, playing fast can be just as musically enjoyable as playing slow.
#10
why not be able to shred all it is, is another technique or set of techniques in your arsenal to express your feeling through music. the more techniques you have an the faster you can play them just means you have more tools in your arsenal then someone who cant shred.
#11
Quote by dave1Mustaine
why not be able to shred all it is, is another technique or set of techniques in your arsenal to express your feeling through music. the more techniques you have an the faster you can play them just means you have more tools in your arsenal then someone who cant shred.


+1000000000
#12
i like to shred because i love the shred artists and i like to play it more than playing slow solos like steve vai

its all about what YOU want to play not what others want you to play
#13
Quote by tom1thomas1
yeah I'm trying to work out what I want to play, obviously I'd like to be able to play anything and everything but that's more of a long term thing than just in the next few years


i'm the same way. sometimes my determination to be a well rounded musician that plays many different genres is my downfall. i practice between 4-6 hours a day and whenever i dont see improvement i get all impatient and discouraged.
#14
I can't shred, I watched a youtube clip on how to do it yesterday and haven't tried it yet.

I would love to be able to though, because even though it's not really my style.. it'd be nice to throw in and it would give me an extra little something to chuck in.

Being able to shred doesn't mean you have to do it throughout the entire song, you just do it when you feel it fits the music.
#15
Quote by Ritley

Don't see playing fast on guitar as shred. See it as playing fast. Look at Pagganini (spelt that wrong I swear) AMAZING violinist, played very fast, never got called a violin shredder lol. The point i'm trying to make is just because something is fast doesn't mean it looses music credibility.


Paganini wasn't called a shredder, but he was called the equivalent, which in those days was "virtuoso". Now that term defines someone who is very skilled at their instrument, but back in the day it meant wanker.

To TS, the fact that you think fast guitarplaying is just a party-trick is (with no offense to you), a sad comment on the state of guitar music. It has gone so far that people wonder if it's even worth doing. My opinion is that you don't want to restrict yourself in any way, so when the time is right for a fast passage, you've got the chops to do it. You don't have to shred for the sake of shredding, I can spend an hour or so everyday practicing my speed chops, but when I'm playing live I'll only do a few bars of it in every other song.
#16
Quote by Aziraphale
Paganini wasn't called a shredder, but he was called the equivalent, which in those days was "virtuoso". Now that term defines someone who is very skilled at their instrument, but back in the day it meant wanker.

To TS, the fact that you think fast guitarplaying is just a party-trick is (with no offense to you), a sad comment on the state of guitar music. It has gone so far that people wonder if it's even worth doing. My opinion is that you don't want to restrict yourself in any way, so when the time is right for a fast passage, you've got the chops to do it. You don't have to shred for the sake of shredding, I can spend an hour or so everyday practicing my speed chops, but when I'm playing live I'll only do a few bars of it in every other song.



I don't think it's always a party trick but except with a few licks from yngwie and randy rhoads it's usually the bend and vibrato on the end that makes it worthwhile to me. also good for air guitar purposes
#17
Learn how to do the fast shredding licks and you will be able to shred like a psycho one day, it just takes practice and is one of the funner parts of music, or to a lot of metal fans anyway, go for it bro, what have you got to lose.
Or, look at what you have to gain?
#18
so you want to know if you should practice until you're technically apt, proficient at your instrument and free from all plausible physical limitations of playing?......
#19
Rather than worrying about what genre of music you want to play, you should focus playing what music you enjoy. That way you can create a unique sound that uses a combination of influences.

Develop your technique further (get the speed that you would need to shred), but don't shred for shredding's sake. That's just guitar wanking. Focus on creating good sounding solos that captivate the listener.
WARNING:This post contains explicit portrayals of violence; sex; violent sex; sexual violence; clowns and violent scenes of violent excess, which are definitely not suitable for all audiences.
#20
Quote by tom1thomas1
I'm kinda schizophrenic about this. I think it'd be cool to be able to sit down and just rip out 20nps but then it's not really a musical thing, more just impressive and fun. But I guess its just suitable for some songs, but you could just do some Jimmy Page style stuff that's not shred but has the same impact. I'm interested in some 'jazz-shred' like in the Carl Roa video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8wv9LfVNy4Y but the really shreddy parts of that are the least jazzy I'm interested in classic rock soloing and jazzy saxophone stuff like John Coltrane. Not really sure about putting hours and hours into a bag of tricks though. I've heard some people say that they grew out of shred.

Anyway maybe just give me some pros and cons to help me decide


It's as simple as this..... play what you want to play. It's your guitar. your time spent.
shred is gaudy music
#21
i don't really know what you're asking. if you want to shred, then learn it. if you don't think you need speed to convey what you hear in your head, then don't. don't do things just to say you can do them.

furthermore, there are plenty of people who "shred" and make beautiful music.

1. Victor Wooten
2. Bela Fleck
3. Eric Johnson
4. John Petrucci
5. Steve Vai
6. Jason Becker
7. Stanley Jordan
8. Bob Zabek
9. Paul Gilbert
10. Andy Timmons
11. Joe Satriani
12. Tony McAlpine
13. Stevie Ray Vaughan (not really a "shredder" per se, but he's pretty damn fast)

etc...

hell, i've used shred runs soloing along to martina mcbridge songs. i wasn't doing francesco fareri runs up and down the fretboard, but if you can throw in a shred run and use it tastefully then i say why the hell not?
"... and on either side of the river was the tree of life, with its twelve kinds of fruit, yielding its fruit each month. The leaves of this tree were for the healing of nations.
Last edited by konfyouzd at Aug 12, 2009,
#23
just about everyone who shreds with melody i consider 'good' shred. things like fransesco fareri get boring very quickly compared to those already mentioned (why was malmsteen, suicmez etc missing!?!?).

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost