#1
I'm making this guitar book to help me study more effectively and be a better versed guitarist. Right now I'm doing most of the rudimentary stuff with the major/minor scale and all the applicable chords.

What I'm asking from all of you fellows here @ musician's talk is to help me find more chords that I should include in my dictionary, as well as a small bit on where they work/what they're cool for. Especially if you can help me find anymore chords that appear naturally in the major scale!

The chords I've already done are: maj, min, aug, dim, maj7, maj9, maj11, maj6, majadd9, maj6add9, maj9#11, maj13#11, maj7b5, maj7#5, min7, min9, min11, min13, m6, madd9, m6add9, mmaj7, mmaj9, m7#5, m7b5, dom7, dom9, dom11, and dom13 and dom7sus4 shapes.

If any one can/is willing to help me out, please do! Thanks.
Washburn WI66 Pro E Celtic Cross (1 of 48!)
Washburn WI66 Pro Honeyburst
Takamine EG334SC Acoustic-Electric
Peavey XXX 120W All Tube Half Stack
Line6 MM4/FM4/DL4
Boss NS2
Vox Snakecharmer Compressor
Digitech XP100 Whammy Wah
#3
that is a lot of chord forms already...
if i were you i would concentrate on explaining chord formation, both how to name chords built on a guitar and also how to construct chords given their name.

the way you're doing it is like doing maths by trying to remember the answer to every question ever rather than just learning how to answer the question.
The only 6 words that can make you a better guitarist:

Learn theory
Practice better
Practice more
#6
Quote by doive
that is a lot of chord forms already...
if i were you i would concentrate on explaining chord formation, both how to name chords built on a guitar and also how to construct chords given their name.

the way you're doing it is like doing maths by trying to remember the answer to every question ever rather than just learning how to answer the question.


listen to this guy^

and no, power-chords are not chord, just an interval or dyad.
#7
Quote by doive
that is a lot of chord forms already...
if i were you i would concentrate on explaining chord formation, both how to name chords built on a guitar and also how to construct chords given their name.

the way you're doing it is like doing maths by trying to remember the answer to every question ever rather than just learning how to answer the question.


+1 the maths thing is funny but so true.


Maj: 1,3,5,7,9,11,13
Min: 1,b3,5,b7,9,11,13
Aug: 1,3,#5,b7,9,11,13
Dim: 1,b3,b5,bb7,9,11,13

Dominant: 1,3,5,b7,9,11,13
m/M7: 1,b3,5,7,9,11,13
Half Dim: 1,b3,b5,b7,9,11,13
Sus2Sus4: 1,2,4,5

+The Theory Behind Add Chords.

^ If you were able to learn how the chords are constructed and were able to apply them you'd have more chords for your chord book than the bible has pages.
#9
Yeah, they are just the root note and the fifth.

Should still be included due to how prevalent they are though.
#10
Quote by Martindecorum
just a quesion, are you learning the shape or the theory behind creating them


Both, but the second is the primary focus because I only need to know a few shapes if I can build them instantaneously.

Quote by doive
that is a lot of chord forms already...
if i were you i would concentrate on explaining chord formation, both how to name chords built on a guitar and also how to construct chords given their name.

the way you're doing it is like doing maths by trying to remember the answer to every question ever rather than just learning how to answer the question.


Quote by Axe Samurai
+1 the maths thing is funny but so true.


Maj: 1,3,5,7,9,11,13
Min: 1,b3,5,b7,9,11,13
Aug: 1,3,#5,b7,9,11,13
Dim: 1,b3,b5,bb7,9,11,13

Dominant: 1,3,5,b7,9,11,13
m/M7: 1,b3,5,7,9,11,13
Half Dim: 1,b3,b5,b7,9,11,13
Sus2Sus4: 1,2,4,5

+The Theory Behind Add Chords.

^ If you were able to learn how the chords are constructed and were able to apply them you'd have more chords for your chord book than the bible has pages.


I substitute teach at a music school, so I already understand how to make chords, I understand what suspended chords are, I understand additions vs. extensions...I know how to do it. I just can't do it as instantaneously as I'd like, and that's the point of this book; getting four or five moveable shapes for all the most prevalent chords that are compatible with the major scale so that I no longer have to be searching and can play more fluidly while training myself to build on the fly. I certainly don't think it's a bad thing.

Listen guys, I know the premise of applying and constructing chords, writing progressions, etc. Really what I'm asking for in this post is exotic forms that you've come across and maybe some info on application if it tends to only naturally exist in weird places. Like, let's say you really liked the 7(#5,b9) chord. Well, that'd be 1-3-#5-b7-b9, so clearly it's not going to work in the major scale w/o introducing non-harmonic tones. So maybe you'd say, "I like using this when I want to lead from a mixo to a locrian with the same tonal center." I don't know if that works for this chord, but I think you all get what I'm sayin' now. Thanks for all the responses!
Washburn WI66 Pro E Celtic Cross (1 of 48!)
Washburn WI66 Pro Honeyburst
Takamine EG334SC Acoustic-Electric
Peavey XXX 120W All Tube Half Stack
Line6 MM4/FM4/DL4
Boss NS2
Vox Snakecharmer Compressor
Digitech XP100 Whammy Wah
Last edited by MadMudgeN at Aug 13, 2009,