#1
Hi UG!

Well heres my problem im doing a chord progression in form of I-IV-V.
Now im trying to improvise by using the pentatonic scale here is my doubt i use am pentatonic on the as it start on key of A but using powerchords so A5 when i change to [IV] do i have to change the key of the pentatonic to D?

Heres another if im using major chords progression is it ok to use the minor pentatonic?

And btw can anyone explain to me what does the 2 tone buttons on the guitar i move them but i dont see any difference.

Waiting for replies as i know you guys always solve my problems

Cheers!
#2
If your progression is in A, try using the F# Minor Pentatonic shape, it'll sound nice over the whole progression.

Yes, you can play the minor pentatonic shapes over a major chord progression.. you won't really be playing a minor anything, but you can use the shapes over them and it will sound nice.
#3
Question one, No the key of the song did not change as D is still within the key of A hense your chord progression I - IV - V

two no u would keep it major pentatonic which corresponds with the major scale

three the tone will either eliminate the higher or lower frequencies, giving a more warmer but flatter tone, or harsher and crisp tone
#5
Martin what you saying on my second question is that better using the major pentatonic on major chords but it is ok using minor on powerchords right?

sorry on the doublepost
#6
F#m is the vi in the A major scale, meaning it's it's relative minor, meaning it has the exact same notes.

So you can use the F# minor pentatonic shape and solo over an A Major progression.
#7
a F#minor pentatonic scale is actually a A-major pentatonic (it has the same notes). every minor scale has its corresponding major scale and vice versa, they share the same notes but start on a different root-notes. since you have a major-progression you can also use a major-pentatonic-scale, it will sound nice and bright. but using a minor scale is absolutly fine too, it's very common in blues/rock, just try is and decide what fits you and the song best. and for the d chord you don't have to switch to the d-pentatonic, a and d pentatonics share notes (a, d and g). just fool around, you'll find out what works great and what doesn't (even though you can't be completely wrong while using a pentatonic.

have a goog one.
#8
Ts - there's nothing wrong with using the parallel minor over a major progression, it's one of the most commonly used melodic devices in blues, rock and metal music - soloing in A minor pentatonic over an A mjaor progression sounds fine.

Ignore King Turi, he's got the wrong end of the stick here - he's talking about relative scales and that wasn't what you were asking about.
Actually called Mark!

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#10
Quote by steven seagull
Ts - there's nothing wrong with using the parallel minor over a major progression, it's one of the most commonly used melodic devices in blues, rock and metal music - soloing in A minor pentatonic over an A mjaor progression sounds fine.

Ignore King Turi, he's got the wrong end of the stick here - he's talking about relative scales and that wasn't what you were asking about.


A minor pentatonic over an A major progression?

I grow weary of this situation.

A major pentatonic would work, obviously, but A minor pentatonic.. nah..

Give me an example of where this happens, the notes would clash and it would be horrible.

A "C" note won't sound very nice over an A Major chord.. unless I'm missing something here?
#11
Yeah, I'm not really sure here, A minor pentatonic doesn't really work over an A Major progression. I'll have to side with Turi here because only the relative minor of A Major would work.
#13
In blues it's common to play the parallell minor pentatonic scale over dominant chords (containing MAJOR 3rds) and it sounds good. Try the progression A7-D7-E7 and play an A minor pentatonic scale over it and you'll see it works. It's actually one of the characteristics of blues, the interplay between the minor 3rd and major 3rd.
#14
Cool, I never got into blues.

Now I know how to play it a little better though.
#15
Quote by King Turi
A minor pentatonic over an A major progression?

I grow weary of this situation.

A major pentatonic would work, obviously, but A minor pentatonic.. nah..

Give me an example of where this happens, the notes would clash and it would be horrible.

A "C" note won't sound very nice over an A Major chord.. unless I'm missing something here?

it works, it gets used all the time in blues and rock music...here's a couple of examples

Highway to Hell - AC/DC
Key of A major, solo in A minor

Freebird
more interesting, main song is in G major, lead slide guitar is also in G major. However for the outro solo the lead parts switch to G minor whilst the key stays as G major.

F# minor on the other hand won't work over an A major progression because it won't exist in that context - all this business about "playing the relative minor" is one of the biggest myths in guitar.
Actually called Mark!

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#16
Cool.

Playing the relative minors "shape" works over the major progressions though.
I realize you aren't really playing a minor anything when the progression is major.
#17
But that shape is still the major scale, there's nothing to be gained from referring to it as the "relative minor" other than confusing matters.

Shapes don't define scales, scales define shapes....shapes aren't inherently anything until you start fleshing them out with notes and intervals and putting everything into some kind of context, and that's what tells you what scale that shape represents.
Actually called Mark!

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Last edited by steven seagull at Aug 13, 2009,
#18
Mark has your questions answered fairly definitively, but I'd like to discuss how I would approach the chord progression in question, as much for anybody else who may have been following as the TS.

The I-IV-V progression allows you to be quite adventurous, but it's still a good idea to play to the chords. Using powerchords, the progression A5-D5-E5 doesn't indicate any particular key, it could just as easily be Am-Dm-Em (key of A minor) as A-D-E (key of A major). For this reason, you could solo in either key and it would be perfectly correct.

If the thirds of the chords are not omitted, then the chords progression does indicate a particular key. If the chords were A-D-E, most would probably play either the A major scale or the A major pentatonic. If you do so, no note will sound "wrong" over any of the three chords. As Mark mentioned, you could also play in the parallel minor, for a blues/rock feel. Here you may want to be a little more careful. If you were to play over the progression in this way, you could play a C note over the A chord, and F over the D chord or a G over the E chord. Played in passing, they don't sound particularly sour, but it you were to hold them, some people will likely think it sounds bad. To avoid this, many would choose to target the chord tones when each chord changes, or choose to target 7ths. Targeting the 7ths breaks the structure of the major progression, the listener will infer the chords A7-D7-E7, which is the basic chord progression in most blues.

If the chord progression is made stronger (something like A-Dmaj7#4-E7, maybe), it will really just sound out if you decide to play across the whole progression in anything other than A major, but lets get back to the basic progression.

If you wanted to be a little more adventurous, you could change key on every chord change. You could play in A major over the A chord, in D major over the D chord and in E major over the E chord. Or, as another way of thinking about it, that's changing the scale from A Ionian (major scale), A Mixolydian (D major scale starting from an A) and A Lydian (E major scale starting from an A). If I were soloing over this progression and wanted to make it interesting, I might do this. You can really push the tonality of the A in each case by taking each of those scales (A Ionian, A Mixolydian and A Lydian), and making it into a harmony to the minor pentatonic. Along with the root, 3rd and 5th, the minor modes are defined by their 2nds and 6ths, both of whivh are omitted in pentatonic formation. The major modes are defined by their root, 3rd, 4th, 5th and 7th. It makes sense then to me to form a pentatonic from the major modes using these notes. If I were playing over the blues progression, A7-D7-E7, I might use this idea, using the pentatonic formed from the A Mixolydian mode, then the D Mixolydian, and then the E Mixolydian. Then of course, there's nothing stopping you from starting with one idea and switching to another later on.
My name is Tom, feel free to use it.