#1
Okay, as the topic suggests, I'm having trouble with a certain type of bend for the guitar. Part of the tab is to bend fret 7 on G to the pitch of 9, but then NO release of the bend (sound wise), and then to hit fret 5 on string b.

The tip says "TIP: When a bend shows no release, yet it is followed by a note on a different string, the string must be released without actually hearing the release. To do this, remove the pressure of your bend slightly so the string becomes muted right at the same moment that you pick the next note."

Can someone provide more clarification? Does he mean to release the bend a bit vertically or as in just releasing it a bit (opposite of bending)? Thank you.
#2
I think he's talking about pressure. You'll have to release the pressure on the note, therefore the note will be muted and then you'll probably have to release.. Not sure though :] but that seems like the most logical solution
#4
Perhaps practice and practice will get this down, haha. Because the tab is to do the bend, then go to the adjacent string, hit 5h8p5 then do a bend on 8 to pitch 10 after X_x.
#5
when you're at the top of the bend release the pressure on the string enough that it doesn't ring out and not so much that you don't pull off to the D note on the 7th fret
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#6
Quote by Jouho
Can someone provide more clarification? Does he mean to release the bend a bit vertically or as in just releasing it a bit (opposite of bending)? Thank you.
yup - it means hold the bend while you let your finger relax away from the fretboard, then release the bend. It might help to use your picking hand to mute it too.
#7
If I lift up away from the fretboard, the string tries to go back to it's original position and thus sounds part of the release. If I lift up too much, it will fling back and make a 'wyong' type noise because of the snap back to starting position. Ugh.
#9
Quote by zhilla
yup - it means hold the bend while you let your finger relax away from the fretboard, then release the bend. It might help to use your picking hand to mute it too.


+1

I would say the picking hand muting it is the key to pulling this off.
#10
Quote by Jouho
If I lift up away from the fretboard, the string tries to go back to it's original position and thus sounds part of the release. If I lift up too much, it will fling back and make a 'wyong' type noise because of the snap back to starting position. Ugh.
You don't need to lift it so much as relax it - take some of the pressure off and the note won't sustain, and then you'll be able to release the bend without it sounding. Just practice slowly.
#11
It might just a little bit of leeway for the note to stop ringing and before it flings back by itself or whatever. Practice slowly is a good idea, . I know I could incorporate right hand with it as well, and I might do that at times, however the instructions in the book is for the left hand. Thank you guys ^_^