#1
I don't really see how a pedal can actually be "tube powered" It take more than 9 or 15 volts to fully power a tube. What you are actually getting in these pedals is similar to how a preamp tube works in a solid state power section in a hybrid amp like a valvestate. Sure it adds some depth and harmonics but the pedals are not "tube powered" in the slighest bit. Its mostly just a marketing scheme.

amiright?
Quote by shakin'cakes
First of all, I enjoy deathcore for it's complexity and it's the only genre heavy enough for me



Quote by Highway60Bob
I want an amp good for playing hippie tunes. I want it to be an actual amp, not a tube amp.
#2
No, you're completely wrong. Most pedals with tubes in them have transformers to bump the voltage up around 250V, which is what they'd see in an amp.
#3
Quote by Roc8995
No, you're completely wrong. Most pedals with tubes in them have transformers to bump the voltage up around 250V, which is what they'd see in an amp.

250V?
Isn't that higher than mains voltage?


¦ Epiphone Sheraton II ¦ GFS Mean 90s ¦ Ampeg J-20 ¦
¦ Fulltone OCD ¦ MXR 6-Band EQ ¦ Behringer Chorus ¦ Artec Analog Delay ¦ EHX Holy Grail ¦
#4
well there are tubes in them, and I believe the average pedal runs at 9 volts, so it could in theory power the tube. I don't know the ins and outs of how they work tho

EDIT: nevermind
Gear:
PRS SE Custom
Takamine G Series Acoustic
Peavey Vypyr 30
Digitech RP 250

Quote by voodoochild23
The only time I'll dance is if Nickelback caught fire and no one helped.
#5
Quote by Roc8995
No, you're completely wrong. Most pedals with tubes in them have transformers to bump the voltage up around 250V, which is what they'd see in an amp.



when something is advertised as having a "triple hybrid gain stage" sure sounds like...a hybrid between the tube and opamps. I know specifically that the pedal im about to get, the tonebone, gets most of the tone from the opamps.
Quote by shakin'cakes
First of all, I enjoy deathcore for it's complexity and it's the only genre heavy enough for me



Quote by Highway60Bob
I want an amp good for playing hippie tunes. I want it to be an actual amp, not a tube amp.
#6
Lower voltages actually results in the distortion straight away versus the headroom higher voltages give. But in doing so you really have to push a very strong signal through resulting in the tubes characteristics transferring to that signal. Most of these pedals do very hard clipping before the tube making the signal have a more tube like quality. Also this is the case and reasons why a tube change actually makes a difference in tone. Those characteristics are rubbing off per say on the signal making it more tube like.

Also to add I own one and personally love it. It adds a good bit of warmth, girth and tone to my mix.
Last edited by IbanezPsycho at Aug 13, 2009,
#8
Quote by JMcG92
250V?
Isn't that higher than mains voltage?

That's what the transformer is for. Transformers lower current and raise voltage.
Quote by pmeg568c
when something is advertised as having a "triple hybrid gain stage" sure sounds like...a hybrid between the tube and opamps. I know specifically that the pedal im about to get, the tonebone, gets most of the tone from the opamps.

A lot of amps - fender hot rod, Marshall silver jubilee, Dumble ODS- get at least some of their clipping from SS devices. Done properly, there's no reason SS clipping can't be part of a great rig.
#9
Quote by Roc8995
No, you're completely wrong. Most pedals with tubes in them have transformers to bump the voltage up around 250V, which is what they'd see in an amp.

Wow, I never realised that.
Is something similar true for hybrid amps too (because I've heard that some simply give enough power to make the tube light up, and that's it)?
Ibanez S320 with Dimarzio Fred + Seymour Duncan 59-> Weeping Demon Wah -> Ibanez TS-7 -> Homemade iBoost x3 -> Keeley DS-1 -> Visual Sound H2O -> MXR Ten Band -> Traynor YCV20
#10
Quote by Roc8995


A lot of amps - fender hot rod, Marshall silver jubilee, Dumble ODS- get at least some of their clipping from SS devices. Done properly, there's no reason SS clipping can't be part of a great rig.


yea im not against solid state devices. But i wouldn't really say these pedals are tube "powered" to be specific. yes changing the tube makes a difference so obviously it has a significant affect but the tube seems to be more for tone sculpting than anything else?
Quote by shakin'cakes
First of all, I enjoy deathcore for it's complexity and it's the only genre heavy enough for me



Quote by Highway60Bob
I want an amp good for playing hippie tunes. I want it to be an actual amp, not a tube amp.
#11
^^It's hard to find these things out for hybrid amps since the schematics for those are hard to find. I do know that the Marshall AVT series has a reasonably high plate voltage, but I haven't been able to measure any other hybrid amps.

^ It's got a tube in it at full plate voltage, and it's got some SS devices as well. You could swap it out for the preamp of any tube amp with a tubescreamer in front of it. I don't see how it's false advertising to call it what it is. "Tube powered" is accurate IMO.
#12
Quote by Roc8995
^^It's hard to find these things out for hybrid amps since the schematics for those are hard to find. I do know that the Marshall AVT series has a reasonably high plate voltage, but I haven't been able to measure any other hybrid amps.

^ It's got a tube in it at full plate voltage, and it's got some SS devices as well. You could swap it out for the preamp of any tube amp with a tubescreamer in front of it. I don't see how it's false advertising to call it what it is. "Tube powered" is accurate IMO.





http://www.schematicheaven.com/marshallamps/vs100r_100w.pdf

http://www.schematicheaven.com/marshall.htm
#14
All depends on the pedal TS. Some use submini tubes that were designed for lower voltage, some of the ibanez pedals come to mind. Some are just gimmicks w starvation voltage provided to the tubes, waste of money. And there are some w a transformer to get the voltage up where it needs to be to work properly. You gotta do your homework on em to get a good one. And obviously you will need to pay some money for a good one.
#15
Quote by Roc8995
That's what the transformer is for. Transformers lower current and raise voltage.

A lot of amps - fender hot rod, Marshall silver jubilee, Dumble ODS- get at least some of their clipping from SS devices. Done properly, there's no reason SS clipping can't be part of a great rig.

Dumble's dont have SS clipping. They have cascaded tube gain stages to get some soft clipping.