#1
The different intervals in different chords make some more consanant than others yes? Does anyone know of any kind of list that puts chords in order of consonance? Thanks.
#2
I'm gonna go out on a limb and guess that a major chord is probably the most consanant chord you can have in our system.
Call me Batman.
#3
Quote by J.A.M
I'm gonna go out on a limb and guess that a major chord is probably the most consanant chord you can have in our system.
then probably minors, then lower would be 7ths 9ths 11ths Sus probably, just want to be sure.
#4
Certain intervals are more stable than others. In order of most consonant to least it goes

Prime
Octave
Fifth
Third
Sixth
Second
Fourth
Seventh

Note : This is based on the major scale, which is the foundation of western music theory and more specific to this thread, chords.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#5
Quote by The_Sophist
Certain intervals are more stable than others. In order of most consonant to least it goes

Prime
Octave
Fifth
Third
Sixth
Second
Fourth
Seventh

Note : This is based on the major scale, which is the foundation of western music theory and more specific to this thread, chords.
not sure how you worked that out, intervals in order of consonance I believe would go

oct
5th
4th
M3
m6
m3
M6
M2
m7
m2
M7
Tritone
#6
Quote by bagamush
The different intervals in different chords make some more consanant than others yes? Does anyone know of any kind of list that puts chords in order of consonance? Thanks.


No, because the consonance of a chord depends largely on context.

not sure how you worked that out, intervals in order of consonance I believe would go

oct
5th
4th
M3
m6
m3
M6
M2
m7
m2
M7
Tritone


The fourth is frequently considered a dissonance, and should not be ranked more consonant than the interval of a third. The tritone is not a particularly dissonant interval, and can actually be resolved into in a few circumstances. Many of the other intervals in your list are ranked...strangely.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
Last edited by Archeo Avis at Aug 13, 2009,
#7
Quote by bagamush
not sure how you worked that out, intervals in order of consonance I believe would go

oct
5th
4th
M3
m6
m3
M6
M2
m7
m2
M7
Tritone



My list is based on context. All the notes that are a semitone away from something are at the end, and the reason it's the fourth and seventh is because they are a semitone away from the two most important notes in the scale.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#8
Quote by Archeo Avis
No, because the consonance of a chord depends largely on context.

I mean totally out of context nothing before or after just stability based on intervals between the notes in the chord itself.
#9
Quote by bagamush
I mean totally out of context nothing before or after just stability based on intervals between the notes in the chord itself.


In which case the list would be completely meaningless and totally useless.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#10
Quote by Archeo Avis
In which case the list would be completely meaningless and totally useless.

Curiosity
#11
Quote by Archeo Avis



The fourth is frequently considered a dissonance, and should not be ranked more consonant than the interval of a third.


Your personal opinion.

I have a number of text books and have had classes where it is described as being more consonant than a 3rd.
shred is gaudy music
#12
If the fourth was more consonant than the major third, the third would pull into the perfect fourth instead of the other way around, and the major scale wouldn't function at all the way it does.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#13
Quote by The_Sophist
If the fourth was more consonant than the major third, the third would pull into the perfect fourth instead of the other way around, and the major scale wouldn't function at all the way it does.


your own conjecture.

Quote by bagamush
The different intervals in different chords make some more consanant than others yes? Does anyone know of any kind of list that puts chords in order of consonance? Thanks.



I don't have a list, but one of my college texts explains it this way...

"a chord containing only the "consonant" intervals is considered a consonant chord. If it contains any other interval, the chord is dissonant."
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 13, 2009,
#14
Quote by Archeo Avis
No, because the consonance of a chord depends largely on context.


The fourth is frequently considered a dissonance, and should not be ranked more consonant than the interval of a third. The tritone is not a particularly dissonant interval, and can actually be resolved into in a few circumstances. Many of the other intervals in your list are ranked...strangely.

a 4th based on the root note is 4:3 ratio in frequency making it more stable than a M3 which is 5:4
Last edited by bagamush at Aug 13, 2009,
#15
Quote by GuitarMunky
Your personal opinion.


No, it really isn't. But you're only saying that because you're desperate for an opportunity to disagree with me, so I won't bother you by explaining what the word "opinion" means.

The fourth is very frequently considered a dissonance, or at least "less consonant" than the third (especially in counterpoint). You could certainly argue that there is disagreement, but claiming that the treatment of the third as more consonant than the fourth is somehow my "personal opinion" is so hilariously moronic that it could only come from someone with a long history of starting arguments for the sole purpose of disagreeing with me.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
Last edited by Archeo Avis at Aug 13, 2009,
#16
Quote by bagamush
a 4th based on the root note is 4:3 ratio in frequency making it more stable than a M3 which is 5:4


nice work

Quote by Archeo Avis
No, it really isn't. But you're only saying that because you're desperate for an opportunity to disagree with me, so I won't bother you by explaining what the word "opinion" means.

The fourth is very frequently considered a dissonance, or at least "less consonant" than the third, save for a few specific circumstances. You could certainly argue that there is disagreement, but claiming that the treatment of the third as more consonant than the fourth is some how my "personal opinion" is so hilariously moronic that could only come from someone with a long history of starting arguments for the sole purpose of disagreeing with me.



Opinion:
"a belief or judgment that rests on grounds insufficient to produce complete certainty."

Your statement easily qualifies and I never said anything beyond that it's your own opinion..... nothing about the hilarity of moronic nature of it. Which honestly I didn't think that at all. I consider it a valid opinion. It's just that it was stated as fact, and I think it's important to clear that up. You support that kind of thing don't you? I mean you have before.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 13, 2009,
#17
Quote by GuitarMunky
your own conjecture.


I don't have a list, but one of my college texts explains it this way...

"a chord containing only the "consonant" intervals is considered a consonant chord. If it contains any other interval, the chord is dissonant."
Thank you, thank is helpful to know
#19
a 4th based on the root note is 4:3 ratio in frequency making it more stable than a M3 which is 5:4


Approximately. We don't use just intonation. Regardless, there are many situation in which the fourth is treated as more dissonant than the third (counterpoint).
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#20
Quote by Archeo Avis
Approximately. We don't use just intonation. Regardless, there are many situation in which the fourth is treated as more dissonant than the third (counterpoint).

"regardless" many situations when it isn't
#21
Here is some good info on the subject...

"Consonant intervals in tonal music

The perfect fifth and the perfect octave are considered perfect consonances. The unison is a consonance insofar as it can be considered an interval at all (many say it cannot).
The major third and sixth, as well as the minor third and sixth, are imperfect consonances.
The perfect fourth is dissonant in some contexts but consonant in others (see below). Specifically, the perfect fourth is dissonant when it is formed with the bass note of any sonority.
[edit]Dissonant intervals

The perfect fourth is considered dissonant in common practice music when not supported by a lower third or fifth (but see below).
Major and minor seconds, sevenths, and ninths are dissonant. Composer/theorist Vincent Persichetti, in his book Twentieth-Century Harmony, classifies major 2nds, minor 7ths, and major 9ths as "soft dissonances," whereas minor 2nds, major 7ths, and minor 9ths are "sharp dissonances."
The tritone (an augmented fourth or diminished fifth) is dissonant. In the Middle Ages and Renaissance, it was known as diabolus in musica because the perfect fifth was considered to be a reflection of the divine, and the tritone falls just short of a perfect fifth.
In Jazz, the minor 9th is often considered too dissonant for practical use. This is the basis for some notes being called "avoid notes", typically the 4th of a major scale - it sounds dissonant because it forms a minor 9th with the 3rd. Other "avoid notes" are the minor 6th in aeolian mode, or the minor 2nd in phrygian mode. Some chords are typically voiced to avoid a minor 9th (musicians invert the interval and play a major 7th instead). For example, in a Cadd11 chord (see Complete List of Chord Patterns), there is a minor ninth between the third, E and the eleventh F. If the F is played below the E, the interval becomes a major seventh, which is less dissonant.
[edit]The perfect fourth

The perfect fourth is the inversion of the perfect fifth. In common practice music, it can be both consonant and dissonant: in this case, it has a need for resolution when unsupported by lower notes, in which case it is dissonant even though it sounds as "good" as the fifth. The fourth is always consonant when supported by a lower third or perfect fifth, for example, E-G-C-E is consonant, but G-C-E is dissonant. In more contemporary music, many consider the fourth to always be as consonant as the fifth.
In Medieval music, the perfect fourth was even considered a perfect consonance, as the perfect fifth and the octave. However, this attitude no longer prevails."

- Wiki
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 13, 2009,
#22
Quote by bagamush
"regardless" many situations when it isn't


Which would be situations in which we're not dealing with counterpoint, and the fourth is not occurring above the bass note, which would make the fourth "Consonant, but...", as opposed to "Consonant". The opportunities for the fourth to function as a perfect consonance actually seem fairly limited, especially given the prevalence of counterpoint in the construction of harmony.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#23
Quote by GuitarMunky
Here is some good info on the subject...

"Consonant intervals in tonal music

The perfect fifth and the perfect octave are considered perfect consonances. The unison is a consonance insofar as it can be considered an interval at all (many say it cannot).
The major third and sixth, as well as the minor third and sixth, are imperfect consonances.
The perfect fourth is dissonant in some contexts but consonant in others (see below). Specifically, the perfect fourth is dissonant when it is formed with the bass note of any sonority.
[edit]Dissonant intervals

The perfect fourth is considered dissonant in common practice music when not supported by a lower third or fifth (but see below).
Major and minor seconds, sevenths, and ninths are dissonant. Composer/theorist Vincent Persichetti, in his book Twentieth-Century Harmony, classifies major 2nds, minor 7ths, and major 9ths as "soft dissonances," whereas minor 2nds, major 7ths, and minor 9ths are "sharp dissonances."
The tritone (an augmented fourth or diminished fifth) is dissonant. In the Middle Ages and Renaissance, it was known as diabolus in musica because the perfect fifth was considered to be a reflection of the divine, and the tritone falls just short of a perfect fifth.
In Jazz, the minor 9th is often considered too dissonant for practical use. This is the basis for some notes being called "avoid notes", typically the 4th of a major scale - it sounds dissonant because it forms a minor 9th with the 3rd. Other "avoid notes" are the minor 6th in aeolian mode, or the minor 2nd in phrygian mode. Some chords are typically voiced to avoid a minor 9th (musicians invert the interval and play a major 7th instead). For example, in a Cadd11 chord (see Complete List of Chord Patterns), there is a minor ninth between the third, E and the eleventh F. If the F is played below the E, the interval becomes a major seventh, which is less dissonant.
[edit]The perfect fourth

The perfect fourth is the inversion of the perfect fifth. In common practice music, it can be both consonant and dissonant: in this case, it has a need for resolution when unsupported by lower notes, in which case it is dissonant even though it sounds as "good" as the fifth. The fourth is always consonant when supported by a lower third or perfect fifth, for example, E-G-C-E is consonant, but G-C-E is dissonant. In more contemporary music, many consider the fourth to always be as consonant as the fifth.
In Medieval music, the perfect fourth was even considered a perfect consonance, as the perfect fifth and the octave. However, this attitude no longer prevails."

- Wiki

gotta love wiki, thanks
#24
Quote by bagamush
gotta love wiki, thanks



NP
yeah, theres some good info there, and it doesn't argue with you.
shred is gaudy music
#25
Quote by GuitarMunky
NP
yeah, theres some good info there, and it doesn't argue with you.