#1
If I have A minor penatonic I move it down 3 frets to F# and play the same pattern I have A major pentatonic, which is also F# minor pentatonic. The relative major of A minor pentatonic is then calculated to be F# Major.

So my question is

Are

A minor pentatonic
A natural minor
A major
F# minor pentatonic
F# natural minor
F# major

All the same scale? By the same scale I mean contain all the same notes as the pentatonics just have notes ommitted.

If so, what makes A minor pentatonic have a different sound than it's major equivalents?
#2
The relative major of A minor is C major, and they sound different because they are completely different. The theory sticky and the crusades articles explain this.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#3
So what does it mean that F# minor pentatonic is the same as A major pentatonic?
#4
Quote by Boxxxed
So what does it mean that F# minor pentatonic is the same as A major pentatonic?

They are not the same. They just share the same notes.
#5
Quote by Boxxxed
So what does it mean that F# minor pentatonic is the same as A major pentatonic?


They aren't the same. They are built off of different roots and have completely different intervalic structures.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#8
Quote by Boxxxed


What you need to understand is that the box shape is just a side effect of the layout of the guitar. Scales are not shapes, they're collections of notes intervals that just happen to make shapes when visualized on the fretboard. The fact that the two scales have the same shape is incidental; the important thing is that they have completely different intervals, and are thus different scales.

The C major scale is a scale built off of C consisting of the intervals of a major second, and a major third, a perfect fourth, a perfect fifth, a major sixth, and a major seventh.

The A minor scale is a scale built off of A with the intervals of a major second, a minor third, a perfect fourth, a perfect fifth, a minor sixth, and a minor seventh.

The only thing that they have in common are the notes, which means absolutely nothing because each note serves a completely different purpose.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#10
Quote by Boxxxed


I didn't watch the video, but judging by its title, I'm assuming it doesn't know what it's talking about. I suggest learning how to construct scales and intervals before you try to understand the relationships between different scales.

A major =/= F# minor

Anything major =/= Anything minor. They will always be different. Hence the different names.

EDIT: And for the love of god... ExpertVillage videos for anything guitar-related are horrible.
Last edited by timeconsumer09 at Aug 13, 2009,