#1
Has anyone here done jazz gigs? I mean actual paid jazz performances.


I've been playing jazz a while now and I'm hoping that because I'm essentially a solo artist, I could pull off some jazz gigs.

So, how on earth do I break into jazz gigging? There's places here that play jazz but I'm unsure as to how exactly you get booked into one of these places.
#3
^Already done this and gotten nowhere. It's like you have to join a secret society or something.

A better way to put it should be: what do I do as a SOLO musician to get into jazz?
#4
1. Be prepared to do some pay to play and free gigs. Grab any open mike possibility available. It take a long time to build up a reputation to play live and get paid.

2. Frequent Jazz clubs and events. If there are jam sessions after the performance, don't be shy get up there and jam. Pick players brains about playing performance and the local scene. Listen to what they say and watch how they network and interact.

3. Don't limit yourself to jazz clubs--in the US coffeehouses and restaurants often have playing opportunities. One of the better places to play in my area is a nice wine bar.


And yes, I've done live jazz in restaurants locally. My guitarist does the occasional wedding and winery event as well. It's fun but its not a great money making opportunity.
#6
Quote by Fassa Albrecht
.
A better way to put it should be: what do I do as a SOLO musician to get into jazz?


Stop thinking of yourself as a SOLO musician.
Learn how to function in a rhythm section as a jazz bassist.
#7
find someone who gigs there, ask if they want a bassist.
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#8
^honestly? It's not that simple. Most jazz groups aren't willing to take on someone unknown in the community or "green". this is why establishing relationships and networking is going to be key. And doing those after hours/after show jams with folks. You are going to have to prove your level of playing before a pro group is even going to consider auditioning you.

A friend of mine plays in a gypsy jazz group. He was seen playing coffee houses and at house venues by a member of the group. He still had to try out 4 times before they let him in. lol.
#9
I wish we had jazz venues in ireland
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#10
To get big in jazz you pretty much have to start young. Like, when your still a teen. Its the only way to get connected enough to really do anything with it. Plus itll take all the better years of your life to become proficient enough in jazz to "hang" with the big guys.

With this in mind, myself my drummer and my guitarist do trio work together at restaurants and other small venues. Its just a matter of putting together a resume (preferably with a sampler CD of sorts) and just dropping it off everywhere you can.


But Im gonna be honest. The fact that you havent been studying jazz more or less all your life, and more importantly, the fact that you probably dont play upright bass means youll likely never get a big band gig. Also, your gonna have to drop that solo bassist attitude. Youll never make it in jazz like that
Last edited by tubatom868686 at Aug 14, 2009,
#11
Actually I do play some double bass...

Also, @ tubatom: you're pretty wrong. Jaco Pastorius didn't play bass until 17 or so, and he did fine, as did Geddy Lee, who can play jazz bass and he didn't start until 17 either.
#12
Well, considering you need management to get a gig, try talking to the club owner, people would be surprised at how easy it really is to book a show. Call the club and ask about the calendar.
#13
To get big in jazz you pretty much have to start young. Like, when your still a teen. Its the only way to get connected enough to really do anything with it. Plus itll take all the better years of your life to become proficient enough in jazz to "hang" with the big guys.


ya man i'm thirteen and i've been doing this for a couple years it's working slowly but surely
#14
On getting gigs. If you play restuarants and cafes, you can figure on starting out on a tip jar basis. We jokingly call it busking with comfortable seats and food.

The thing to remember, if you are playing clubs (with or without cover charges) the bottom line is that the owners / managers will book acts that will bring in the bodies and buy drinks. The reason most open mike nights are off nights (Non-weekends) is because they know that friends will come in with the performers and rack up the bar bills on less popular nights.
#15
^ just follow what the lady said. And do you have a band that you play with? Because yea it's cool to listen to someone lay down some cool licks on bass....for about 5 minutes after that it gets boring. Hence why you need a band to add depth and character. Look at the Jaco Big Band, his names in the title but 90% of the time the bass in doing the rhythm and only 10% does he do lead. Like mentioned before, stop thinking of yourself as a solo musician and get out there and find some people to play with. If you're lucky those people might already have an "in" to gigging and if not then do as mentioned above and play what you can get until you can convince the club managers to let you in
#16
Quote by Fassa Albrecht
Actually I do play some double bass...

Also, @ tubatom: you're pretty wrong. Jaco Pastorius didn't play bass until 17 or so, and he did fine, as did Geddy Lee, who can play jazz bass and he didn't start until 17 either.


Actually, Im pretty right. For starters, Jaco started playing bass at age 13 after an injury left him unable to play drums anymore.

And geddy lee is skilled, but certainly not a jazz player.

But that doesnt matter, because I said you have to start when your a teen. And last I checked, being 17 would make you a teenager

And *some* double bass is not enough. You have to be at least as good at upright as you are at electric.
Last edited by tubatom868686 at Aug 16, 2009,
#17
Quote by thunderbritches
^ just follow what the lady said. And do you have a band that you play with? Because yea it's cool to listen to someone lay down some cool licks on bass....for about 5 minutes after that it gets boring. Hence why you need a band to add depth and character. Look at the Jaco Big Band, his names in the title but 90% of the time the bass in doing the rhythm and only 10% does he do lead. Like mentioned before, stop thinking of yourself as a solo musician and get out there and find some people to play with. If you're lucky those people might already have an "in" to gigging and if not then do as mentioned above and play what you can get until you can convince the club managers to let you in



Only problem is that I know NO-ONE who plays jazz to a gigging standard.
#18
Jazz clubs tend not to have bouncers, so I would just walk in. Get a drink from the bar, and enjoy .

Oh, wait...
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#19
lulz at nutter

at ts, then do as miss anarkee suggested and go and play with some of the musicians after they've finished their set list and they're just playing around, let them see what you've got and even if they may not need a bass player they may know someone who does, also as she said, connections are key, so though you don't have any now, everyones got to start somewhere