#1
Okay if i am playing modes in C its

C ionian cmajor chord
D dorian dminor chord
E phrygian em chord
F lydian f major chord
G Mix Gmajor chord
A Aeolian A minor chord
B Locrian B dim chord


that means using co5 that

G ionian Gchord
A dorian Aminor chord
B phrygian Bm chord
C lydian Cmajor chord
D mix Dmajor chord
E aeolian E minor chord
Fsharp Locrian Fsharp dim chord


is that right?
#3
Yeah dude. This is a lot of things, but "Noob" is not one of them. You seem to know more then the rest of us do.
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#5
Those are the correct modes of the G major scale, yes. Modes are not as simple as "playing on a different root", though. Please read through the theory lesson in my sig and the myriad mode thread a quick search will reveal. Certainly, if I'm not around to help you when you're confused, someone will be.
#6
Quote by Serg1
words


The modes you listed are right, but when you say "modes in C", you're not being wholly accurate. D dorian is not "in C". It is D dorian, not C anything. You seem to have some understanding, though. I suggest you start looking at modes in relation to a single tonic. i.e. compare C major to C dorian, or C minor to C phrygian. Much more useful in understanding, IMO.
#7
Indeed, the modes of a scale use the same notes, but the starting interval is different. C major is CDEFGABC, while D dorian is DEFGABCD, if that makes sense.

And trust me that modes aren't the easiest part of theory. It took me two months to fully understand them.
#8
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Those are the correct modes of the G major scale, yes. Modes are not as simple as "playing on a different root", though. Please read through the theory lesson in my sig and the myriad mode thread a quick search will reveal. Certainly, if I'm not around to help you when you're confused, someone will be.


i understand thats why i obviously put the fsharp in there to represent the g major scale, and i meant to type 'starting from C', but modes are based of the major scale always are they not?
#9
Quote by Serg1
i understand thats why i obviously put the fsharp in there to represent the g major scale, and i meant to type 'starting from C', but modes are based of the major scale always are they not?


Yes, they are. It's just a trap that a great majority of people fall into, thinking that modes are just playing the same scale but starting in a different place. If you actually understand that this isn't the case, then more power to you!
#10
ok additional question if i were playing in the relative minor of c Aminor would that be


Aaeolian
B locrian
C ionian
D dorian
E phrygian
F lydian
G mix
Last edited by Serg1 at Aug 13, 2009,
#12
Quote by KillahSquirrel
Yes, but if you were playing in A minor, all those would be just A minor scale.


alright A aeolian then
#13
Quote by Serg1
alright A aeolian then


It's pointless to try to derive modes from modes. Modes are derived from the major scale. The modes you listed would be RELATIVE to the original, but they're still all derived from the parent major scale.
#14
Yes, just A minor - the other modes won't occur in that particular context...don't fall into the trap of looking for modes everywhere because a lot of the time they aren't present. The mode doesn't change as the chord changes, if your song is in the key of C major then it's all just C major, the modes don't exist.

Likewise don't be fooled into thinking you can "play the relative minor" to change things round a bit - you can't, all you're doing is playing the exact same scale somewhere else. The music will either be in C major or A minor - patterns don't really mean anything when it comes to actually determining the scale you're using.
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#15
Quote by steven seagull
Yes, just A minor - the other modes won't occur in that particular context...don't fall into the trap of looking for modes everywhere because a lot of the time they aren't present. The mode doesn't change as the chord changes, if your song is in the key of C major then it's all just C major, the modes don't exist.

Likewise don't be fooled into thinking you can "play the relative minor" to change things round a bit - you can't, all you're doing is playing the exact same scale somewhere else. The music will either be in C major or A minor - patterns don't really mean anything when it comes to actually determining the scale you're using.


i thought i was right, i always doubt myself.

i understand that but it still is technically the relative minor which makes my understanding easier.
#16
Quote by Serg1
i meant to type 'starting from C'
Where?

Quote by Serg1
but modes are based of the major scale always are they not?
No. There are modes of the melodic and harmonic minor scale (and any other scale, really, though many of them are largely useless).

Quote by Serg1
i understand that but it still is technically the relative minor which makes my understanding easier.
What is still the relative minor?
#17
...ya im goona have to learn this stuff soon, none of this makes sense to me
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