#1
Hello.

im kinda new to guitar, and i was wondering.


does it matter what kind of strings you get?
because ive seen all these strings with different gauges and sizes and made out of different things.

please could someone help me with this.
yerp.
#2
Yes, it does matter what strings you get.
You get a different tone out of every string brand.
Also, the thicker the string, the longer your sustain will be, but the harder it will be to bend the string.
Generally, electric guitars are set up (factory settings) to have .009 (light) or .010 (about medium) gauges. If this is about an acoustic I'm not sure what gauges they need..
Be careful putting on thick strings, as you may have your guitar readjusted, or else you could snap the neck, some guitars just aren't made for thick strings. I would recommend getting .010 strings if you're a beginner, and if your guitar isn't properly set up for that (ask someone in your local guitar shop), have it set up for .010's..
Hope that helped.
Last edited by RDSElite at Aug 14, 2009,
#3
DON'T put steel strings on a nylon string classical guitar.

They don't have the metal trussrods that run up steel string acoustics' and electrics' necks to withstand the tension.
#4
Quote by RDSElite
You get a different tone out of every string brand...


That is highly debatable. I've never noticed a real change in tone between string brands, and if there was any change it was so minute that it wouldn't make a difference.


Quote by RDSElite
...Be careful putting on thick strings, as you may have your guitar readjusted, or else you could snap the neck, some guitars just aren't made for thick strings.


I love how much people exaggerate and overreact. You can safely go up or down a couple gauges without needing any adjustments. Its when you jump several gauges (say .009s to .013s) that you need to make adjustments. Also, scale length and tuning play a huge role in this as well.


TS: For the most part strings come down to personal preference. It is up to you to play around with several brands and gauges and find which ones YOU think are most comfortable, produce the best tone, and have the longest lifespan. Most packages are labeled (Electric, Acoustic, Classical) so putting on strings made of the wrong material shouldn't be that hard to avoid.
#5
Quote by i_am_metalhead
That is highly debatable. I've never noticed a real change in tone between string brands, and if there was any change it was so minute that it wouldn't make a difference.


Well, they definetily feel different. And I think there is a tone change (although maybe that's just in my mind).

Quote by i_am_metalhead
I love how much people exaggerate and overreact. You can safely go up or down a couple gauges without needing any adjustments.


Not when you have a non-locking trem.. My old Ibanez GRG needed adjusting when I switched from .009 to .010. Beside that, I am just careful with my gear..
Last edited by RDSElite at Aug 14, 2009,
#6
Quote by blue_strat
DON'T put steel strings on a nylon string classical guitar.

They don't have the metal trussrods that run up steel string acoustics' and electrics' necks to withstand the tension.


i had a guitar i didn't use and had acoustic strings on it for a year and it still feels the way it did before
Last edited by Darkflame at Aug 14, 2009,
#7
Don't worry too much about strings. For an electric, get 9-42 strings. They are easier to bend and play. I recommend Ernie Ball Super Slinkys.