#1
So I was trying to work out how piano chords compare to guitar (i am new at both). I know that you have to have all the same notes as in CM on piano is CEG and on the fret board you play XCEGCE but you don't play the low e sting, play it I mean it is an E which fits with the chord or even fret both the 5th and 6th strings with you ring finger cause the 6 sting third fret is G which also fits. Also alot of chords have some notes from the piano chord repeated multiple times when other notes only sound once, shouldn't we not want to outnumber some notes? I guess what I am asking is what are the requirments for a guitar chord other than just containing only the notes pressent in the piano chord.
#2
None.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#3
a chord is 3 or more tones played at the same time (or implied as in an arpeggiation) you can play the chord however you want ideally. if you want to hit the open E on your C major chord you can, it will just be considered an inversion of C. as for doubling notes in full chords on a guitar, thats done for both simplicity and filling out the sound. alot of classical guitar players will only play whats on the sheet music. so if the sheet music asks for just a specific C,E and G the player will only hit those notes and nothing outside those.
#4
Typical chord shapes on the guitar contain the notes they do because they're convenient shapes for your fingers. The easiest shape to play on the guitar is not necessarily going to have the exact combination of notes that the easiest shape for the same chord on the piano.
Quote by Ed O'Brien
“It’s not genius. It’s just that if you want something good to come out of something, you have to put in a lot of effort. That involves a lot of hard work, and a lot of blood, sweat and tears sometimes.”

http://urbanscarecrow.bandcamp.com/
#5
then could i, for example, play a C13 by baring the 5th fret and then freting the high E on the 6th with my index? Seems like a really simple way to play it compared to the normal way. it would still include them in this order ADGCEA#

or even A#DGCEA if i wanted to?
#6
Quote by bagamush
So I was trying to work out how piano chords compare to guitar (i am new at both). I know that you have to have all the same notes as in CM on piano is CEG and on the fret board you play XCEGCE but you don't play the low e sting, play it I mean it is an E which fits with the chord or even fret both the 5th and 6th strings with you ring finger cause the 6 sting third fret is G which also fits. Also alot of chords have some notes from the piano chord repeated multiple times when other notes only sound once, shouldn't we not want to outnumber some notes? I guess what I am asking is what are the requirments for a guitar chord other than just containing only the notes pressent in the piano chord.

you can play that low E if you want. it would just be an inversion of the chord. it all depends on the sound you want to have. you could have G at the bottom of the chord as well. i remember i did an acoustic show once and they only had two mics. so the singers and the fiddle player used the mics and me and the other player had to play unplugged. so i used a lot of inversions like the C chord with the low G. it helps fill out the sound and make it louder. so thats one reason for inversions but usually its just for the sound or sometimes to lead into other chords.
#7
Quote by bagamush
So I was trying to work out how piano chords compare to guitar (i am new at both). I know that you have to have all the same notes as in CM on piano is CEG and on the fret board you play XCEGCE but you don't play the low e sting, play it I mean it is an E which fits with the chord or even fret both the 5th and 6th strings with you ring finger cause the 6 sting third fret is G which also fits. Also alot of chords have some notes from the piano chord repeated multiple times when other notes only sound once, shouldn't we not want to outnumber some notes? I guess what I am asking is what are the requirments for a guitar chord other than just containing only the notes pressent in the piano chord.


It's just a matter of voicing. C E G = C Major

On the guitar you can voice that a number of different ways. There really are no guitar specific requirements.
shred is gaudy music
#8
Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
you can play that low E if you want. it would just be an inversion of the chord. it all depends on the sound you want to have. you could have G at the bottom of the chord as well. i remember i did an acoustic show once and they only had two mics. so the singers and the fiddle player used the mics and me and the other player had to play unplugged. so i used a lot of inversions like the C chord with the low G. it helps fill out the sound and make it louder. so thats one reason for inversions but usually its just for the sound or sometimes to lead into other chords.

But can using inversion sometimes screw up a song, I imagine they would or else a 6 sting c chord would probably be used all the time?
#9
Quote by bagamush
But can using inversion sometimes screw up a song, I imagine they would or else a 6 sting c chord would probably be used all the time?


It won't screw it up. It's just a matter of personal taste.

but yes, root position chords are more common..... on any instrument.
shred is gaudy music
#10
Bass movement is an important part of composition. Both inverted and non-inverted chords have there own place in it.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#11
Quote by bagamush
But can using inversion sometimes screw up a song, I imagine they would or else a 6 sting c chord would probably be used all the time?

no it wouldnt screw up anything. it would just sound slightly different. it would still sound like a C chord though. and actually i know some people that use that version of C all the time. i use a different verison of G the normal way is:

3 3
0 3
0 0
0 0
2 2
3 3
i play the second one.

i just like the sound more. usually when i play a D chord i usually play the A underneath the open D as well. again, i just like the sound better. i also usually play the hendrix version of barre chords. the notes are still there but they just arent always played the "normal" way. usually people use the 5th in the root for a deeper or more agressive sound. works well with over drive.
Last edited by Blind In 1 Ear at Aug 14, 2009,
#12
So I'm assuming you can have as many inversions (including the origional) as there are notes in the chord. I.e. CM: CEG, EGC, GCE. 1 standard 2inversions? and then 3 inversions for a 4 note chord?
#13
Quote by bagamush
So I'm assuming you can have as many inversions (including the origional) as there are notes in the chord. I.e. CM: CEG, EGC, GCE. 1 standard 2inversions? and then 3 inversions for a 4 note chord?


yep you can. Any note in the chord can serve as a bass note
shred is gaudy music
#14
Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
no it wouldnt screw up anything. it would just sound slightly different. it would still sound like a C chord though. and actually i know some people that use that version of C all the time. i use a different verison of G the normal way is:

3 3
0 3
0 0
0 0
2 2
3 3
i play the second one.

i just like the sound more. usually when i play a D chord i usually play the A underneath the open D as well. again, i just like the sound better. i also usually play the hendrix version of barre chords. the notes are still there but they just arent always played the "normal" way. usually people use the 5th in the root for a deeper or more agressive sound. works well with over drive.
oh alright thanks, that's what i needed to hear
#15
Quote by GuitarMunky
yep you can. Any note in the chord can serve as a bass note

alright cool thanks. 1 more question. Not sure why anyone would want to do this but i'm just curios. instead of just switching the base note could you switch the next 2 notes. Rather than play CEG with 1 white key between each, play C skip 3 white keys to G then skip 4 White keys to the E in the next octave? Is there any use for that kind of arrangement... ever?
#16
Quote by bagamush
alright cool thanks. 1 more question. Not sure why anyone would want to do this but i'm just curios. instead of just switching the base note could you switch the next 2 notes. Rather than play CEG with 1 white key between each, play C skip 3 white keys to G then skip 4 White keys to the E in the next octave? Is there any use for that kind of arrangement... ever?


You could do that. It would just be a more open sounding voicing. Try it and compare the sound to when the notes are closer together.
shred is gaudy music
#17
Quote by GuitarMunky
You could do that. It would just be a more open sounding voicing. Try it and compare the sound to when the notes are closer together.

Alright thank you very much