#1
When deriving triads from major scales why do minor and diminished chords pop up. Other than the technical reason of counting and resulting in those chords, the "musical" reason. In some major scales some roots are major, some minor, some diminished. What is the relationship between scales in regards to the manner of the roots being of a certain chord quality?
#2
I-ii-iii-IV-V-vi-vii* (major scale formula)

M-m-m-M-M-m-* (corresponding chord characteristics, * indicates diminished)

So in the key of C, you have C, Dm, Em, F, G, Am, Bdim

The root note of a major scale means that the root note chord will be major, not necessarily all the other notes, which could be major minor or diminished

And remember, there are more complex chords that can be harmonized with the major scale
#3
I know how those chords are derived and that the chord quality is always in the same order. I asked what the musical reason is for certain chords being of a certain chord quality in certain major scales. I.e. Is there a chord(s) common to more than one major scale? If so, what is the relationship between the scales in regards to the common chord(s)
#4
Well, using the cycle of fifths, your I-V from the key of C will be the I- IV in the next key, G. And the I-V in G will be the I-IV in the key of D. Hence, for that G chord, you could flavour it in any of the three majors of those keys, providing you cater for your next chord to flow with it.

Using the Cycle of fourths, your ii and vi chords will be the iii and vi chords in the next key....etc, etc... same applies with those keys' scales. You can flavour however you want to, once again, just making sure to flow with the next chord.

If you know this, my apologies.... maybe someone else can learn from it.
#6
Quote by evolucian
Well, using the cycle of fifths, your I-V from the key of C will be the I- IV in the next key, G. And the I-V in G will be the I-IV in the key of D. Hence, for that G chord, you could flavour it in any of the three majors of those keys, providing you cater for your next chord to flow with it.
Using the Cycle of fourths, your ii and vi chords will be the iii and vi chords in the next key....etc, etc... same applies with those keys' scales. You can flavour however you want to, once again, just making sure to flow with the next chord.

If you know this, my apologies.... maybe someone else can learn from it.

i remember reading that you can completely change keys by using identical chords in other progressions, would this be one way of doing it?
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Quote by ilikepirates
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#7
Yep. You need to get to C major from D major? Gmaj. Plus G is C's seventh, so it will resolve even better. Unfortunately, this won't always apply. So if you need to change to a different key that doesn't share any chords, you may have to pass through some other keys, but all ones that share with the next.

This is all just an overly complicated way of telling you how to change keys by travelling the circle of fifths, which is quite off-topic. Sorry.
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#8
Quote by Ribcage
Yep. You need to get to C major from D major? Gmaj. Plus G is C's seventh, so it will resolve even better. Unfortunately, this won't always apply. So if you need to change to a different key that doesn't share any chords, you may have to pass through some other keys, but all ones that share with the next.

This is all just an overly complicated way of telling you how to change keys by travelling the circle of fifths, which is quite off-topic. Sorry.

the thing i was reading used "livin on a prayer" by Bon Jovi after the solo when they change keys seemlessly, lol which is where they lost me
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Quote by ilikepirates
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#9
^Or of course you can just out and out switch keys; is very jarring but can regain the interest of the listener.
Quote by Boxxxed
When deriving triads from major scales why do minor and diminished chords pop up. Other than the technical reason of counting and resulting in those chords, the "musical" reason. In some major scales some roots are major, some minor, some diminished. What is the relationship between scales in regards to the manner of the roots being of a certain chord quality?

Sorry about not answering this yet.
A chord (or scale) is determined major or minor or diminished etc by what kind of third, fifth, and seventh it has.

Ex: C in C major has C, E, G, B. This makes it major, because of the 4 half steps between C and E, the perfect fifth (G, 7 half steps), and a major seventh (B, 11 half steps). Therefore this would be notated Cmaj7.
Now let's take D in C major. Spelled D, F, A, C. This makes it minor, because of the 3 half steps between D and F, the perfect fifth (A), and a minor seventh (C, 10 half steps).
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