#1
I'm teaching my little brother guitar, he's six, pretty quick at picking things up and very enthusiastic

I bought him a nice half-size guitar on Thomann, and i've given him three lessons so far.
I've shown him a couple of chords and he can strum well, and i've shown him a couple of simple things on a single string (like an excerpt from carol of the bells, y'know, doo dododoo doo dododoo ). Basically, he's probably ready for smoke on the water.

I'm not in the house very often, as i don't live with my parents, but i've committed to going back once a week to give him a lesson. He practices while i'm away, which kinda surprised me, and his sense of rhythm is spot-on. So i need to be able to give him new things to do while i'm gone that he can work on by himself, and i need to keep his interest high.

So... any suggestions? I'll be gone this time next year, so i've got one year to instill the basics. He can read tab, slowly, and he can read a chord diagram. His picking is good so far, no bad habits. Where to next? And where to after that?

Thanks guys
Fun Animal Facts #23: The pit can skeletonise a cow in under three minutes
#2
Teach him songs he likes using chords he's learnt.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#3
Aw c'mon, i need more specific help than that. I haven't taught anyone before this, i'd like some general tips as well

Edit: and his exposure to music is limited too, my parents have awful taste, and i'm under strict instruction from the feckers not to introduce him to anything "loud, heavy, angry or overly hyperactive"
Fun Animal Facts #23: The pit can skeletonise a cow in under three minutes
Last edited by Captain Howdy at Aug 14, 2009,
#4
Have him memorize the major scale and minor scale after that. Maybe start with pentatonic versions, then have him move on to the full version later on. That'll buy you at least a month right there.

Oh, and in my experience, it's a good thing that they listen to bad music. That'll inspire him to go and find good music when he hits puberty and realizes he hates them, and wants to piss them off. That's the way it's supposed to work! Little kids whose parents play The Who and AC/DC for them just don't learn what rock n roll is really about.
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Last edited by Sid McCall at Aug 14, 2009,
#5
cheers that's a good idea, getting some of the mechanics in at the start. Any way of making it more fun? thanks
Fun Animal Facts #23: The pit can skeletonise a cow in under three minutes
#6
teach him everything wrong ::shock::

i would hate it if i had siblings that better than me at guitar

...

its cuz i suck ...

Edit ...

yeh make him learn scales and stuff .. teach him how to use a metronome
Last edited by kakos at Aug 14, 2009,
#7
Quote by Captain Howdy
I'm teaching my little brother guitar, he's six, pretty quick at picking things up and very enthusiastic

I bought him a nice half-size guitar on Thomann, and i've given him three lessons so far.
I've shown him a couple of chords and he can strum well, and i've shown him a couple of simple things on a single string (like an excerpt from carol of the bells, y'know, doo dododoo doo dododoo ). Basically, he's probably ready for smoke on the water.

I'm not in the house very often, as i don't live with my parents, but i've committed to going back once a week to give him a lesson. He practices while i'm away, which kinda surprised me, and his sense of rhythm is spot-on. So i need to be able to give him new things to do while i'm gone that he can work on by himself, and i need to keep his interest high.

So... any suggestions? I'll be gone this time next year, so i've got one year to instill the basics. He can read tab, slowly, and he can read a chord diagram. His picking is good so far, no bad habits. Where to next? And where to after that?


Thanks guys


method book (teach him to read)
+
easy songs/riffs


scale patterns and/or theory for a 6 year old doesn't make much sense to me.

Get him playing some music, whether it's twinkle twinkle, or smoke on the water or both.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 14, 2009,
#8
I think i've got an idea of where i'm going, he's definitely smart enough to handle theory, he picked up tab straight off. But i will keep giving him fun things to play, and things he might recognise, like the winnie the pooh theme. i'll show him how the two are related, and that'll keep him busy for a while. Thanks for the help lads
Fun Animal Facts #23: The pit can skeletonise a cow in under three minutes
#9
sing notes with him and use a metronome.

he will have a great ear and be an amazing guitarist.
#10
Quote by Sid McCall
Little kids whose parents play The Who and AC/DC for them just don't learn what rock n roll is really about.
The only problem with that statement is that the Who is ****ing amazing.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#11
^
+1

Dude, kids whose parents give him bad music often end up in Hot Topic trying to look hardcore and couldn't name a decent band if we told them the band's name. I'd much prefer to get my kids into good music from the get go.
#14
I don't know if this will help much but:

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/columns/general_music/teaching_guitar_for_money_how_good_do_you_need_to_be.html

I know your not teaching for money, but it provides some tips on the teaching aspect.

And I would say lay off the scales and etc. until he gets a little better, IMO. He doesn't really need to learn theory at this point.

As he gets better, try to find more bands that might suit his skill level. I know he's six and it might be hard to convince him that bands like Protest the Hero are awesome (or whatever band you might have in mind), but just try to get him interested in more technical bands once he reaches a higher level of guitar playing.

Of course, if he doesn't like what you show him, don't be too pushy. Once he feels he needs a challenge he will find it himself, whether by finding new bands, or improving upon the skills he already has by playing what he knows, or even making his own songs.

Be cooperative. When he learns something new, congradulate and praise him - it will push him to higher levels.
Last edited by Dregen at Aug 17, 2009,