#1
So, why is the single-coil angled on a strat? is it purely aesthetic? i tried google and bing, but they did not yield any results.

thanks!
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#2
i have always asked myself the same thing. i think it's just for looks. i think it would look weird if all three were just straight and in line.
#3
No, whether or not it was leo fender's reasoning , angling a p/up does affect the tone.
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#4
It supposedly gives you a good balance of bass and treble.
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#5
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It supposedly gives you a good balance of bass and treble.


this is what i was thinking because i could see how a bridge single could possibly be way too thin if that bass side of the pickup was too close to the bridge. but i wasn't sure if i was anyway correct in that assumption
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#6
I've tried it straight and angled. No huge difference. It's mostly just aesthetic. It LOOKS like it'd "balance out the tone". I think that's mainly the point.

Back when the tele and strat were invented, putting a pup that close to the bridge hadn't been done. I guess Leo thought people would pick up on this (no pun intended), so when he was designing it, he wanted it to look functional, for lack of a better word, so that people wouldn't say "wow, that's so close to the bridge, I bet it'll sound terrible since there's little string deflection at that point" (you get the idea). Hence the angled bridge pups on teles and strats.

That's my theory, anyway.
#9
IMO it looks much better angled, but it shouldn't make much of a difference. It does make a difference in tone, but it's not big.
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#10
i thought the balance thing too, but then jags arent angled at the bridge at all, and they were actually intended to replace strats when they first came out, and to invader idk if i get what ur saying, how does angling it make it look functional?
#11
The reason we think it looks better angled is because that is what we are accustomed to.
Angled "looks more functional" because it makes people assume that it is angled for better sound (whether it does affect sound or not is irrelevant so long as people think that it does.)
#12
Moving the PUP away from the bridge increases the proportion of fundamental and lower harmonic vibrations of the string, the tonal balance. This is why we have multiple PUPs. Angling the PUP will richen up the sound at the end furthest from the bridge.

Fender would have set this up with the strings of the time which would have been thicker than today's. Whether you hear the difference would depend upon the strings you use and the eq settings you have.