#1
Ok, so I really like to play music by yngwie malmsteen and rob marcello and want to learn how to write songs in that style of music, but the songs always turn into metal songs, with little to no resemblance to how they play. Does anybody know anything that will help me become a better neoclassical song writer, I can play alot of stuff by people like yngwie, but my stuff never sounds like it. And yes, I know how to sweep pick, (know alot of Jason Becker songs) alternate pick good, and string skipping. Any suggestions on how to gain better neoclassical song writing ability, thanx.
#2
study the writing style of malmsteen and those others. like what kind of intervals is he using, what scales, etc. then write in that same way.
#3
You could try learning or using the harmonic minor scale.
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#4
Quote by awesomo41894
Ok, so I really like to play music by yngwie malmsteen and rob marcello and want to learn how to write songs in that style of music, but the songs always turn into metal songs, with little to no resemblance to how they play. Does anybody know anything that will help me become a better neoclassical song writer, I can play alot of stuff by people like yngwie, but my stuff never sounds like it. And yes, I know how to sweep pick, (know alot of Jason Becker songs) alternate pick good, and string skipping. Any suggestions on how to gain better neoclassical song writing ability, thanx.


Neo Classical means New Classical. You have to remember Yngwie was heavily influenced by classical music, especially Bach.

Start listening to classical music and study the scales that are used and scales used by Malmsteen and such.
#5
Synthesizer helps. Make sure there's only 1 guitar track. Harmonic/Melodic Minor scale. Arpeggios of all chords. 7th chords, diminished, and augmented.
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#6
Harmonic minor is going to get you well on your way to sounding malmsteenish' but the patterns he plays are just as important. Such as trills pedal tones etc.
^Note: Probably sarcastic
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#7
TC, if you want to play land write like Malmsteen, there's an easy to way to do it.

Play his music. Maybe try out classical guitar parts. I'm certain that there are a number of fully and reasonably accurately tabbed out concertos here on UG. Also, look at Bach. Malmsteen essentially takes that style of writing and plays it with modern instruments.
#8
Malmsteen also loved Richie Blackmore and he was totally enamoured with Hendrix. There's more to his playing than the Paganini influenced stuff, regardless of the other people like Vinnie Moore and Tony Macalpine.

He is a rocker, he hates buzzsaw guitars and favours the tone of a note rather than a mishmash of flurry. His left and right hand are flawless from years of practicing prior to Alcatrazz and solo.

He has amazing groove, which is possibly why your takes sound like metal. Dunno if I've made it clear, Its his rhythm. You get the rhythm, then analyze your chords and work on the tonality you want them to have (assuming its power chords you are using) and place the notes carefully. Once that is done, work on the fluidity of your sound.

If you can play the Becker, Malmsteen and whomever else... I have to ask... Was it tabs you learned from? Because if it was the ear that you used, your post may not have been here. Assuming it was tabs, break it down bar by bar. What does he do in this bar over that chord, how does he connect to the next bar and chord? Which notes do they hang on and why? What does it add to the tonality of said chord?

Now that takes work, feel free to do it and good luck
#9
Quote by evolucian
Malmsteen also loved Richie Blackmore and he was totally enamoured with Hendrix. There's more to his playing than the Paganini influenced stuff, regardless of the other people like Vinnie Moore and Tony Macalpine.

He is a rocker, he hates buzzsaw guitars and favours the tone of a note rather than a mishmash of flurry. His left and right hand are flawless from years of practicing prior to Alcatrazz and solo.

He has amazing groove, which is possibly why your takes sound like metal. Dunno if I've made it clear, Its his rhythm. You get the rhythm, then analyze your chords and work on the tonality you want them to have (assuming its power chords you are using) and place the notes carefully. Once that is done, work on the fluidity of your sound.

If you can play the Becker, Malmsteen and whomever else... I have to ask... Was it tabs you learned from? Because if it was the ear that you used, your post may not have been here. Assuming it was tabs, break it down bar by bar. What does he do in this bar over that chord, how does he connect to the next bar and chord? Which notes do they hang on and why? What does it add to the tonality of said chord?

Now that takes work, feel free to do it and good luck


All he saw from Hendrix was him burning his guitar at Monterey. Otherwise he was never influenced by Hendrix and he has stated this in several interviews.
#10
Really? That doesn't make sense then him being soooo pissed off not being asked to contribute to the Hendrix Tribute disc a few years ago... can't remember what it was called. Can you explain it? I'm sure you can...

But take a look at this, its quite similar to a guitar school interview i had somewhere... or it was another mag, but anyway...

YNGWIE MALMSTEEN ON JIMI

Swedish guitar hero Yngwie Malmsteen first entered the public eye via the 'Spotlight' column for new talent in the February '83 issue of 'Guitar Player' magazine. After a move from his native Stockholm, Yngwie (pronounced 'Ing-vay') relocated in LA and following a brief spell with Steeler he formed Alcatrazz with singer Graham Bonnet. In June '84 Yngwie left Alcatrazz to pursue a solo carear fronting his band 'Rising Force'.

Yngwie is one of the few rock guitarists who can be said to have founded a new genre. Unfortunately, 'neo-Classical Metal' all-too-often sounds like an epileptic Paganini cranked through a Marshall stack - blindingly fast harmonic minor scales, rippling arpeggios and dramatic gestures but played with a cavalier disregard for dynamics, form and melody. Along with Paganini (epileptic or otherwise), Yngwie has frequently cited his other main influences as being JS Bach and Jimi Hendrix.

UV: Do you remember the first time you heard Hendrix?
YM: Yeah - it was the day he died. That was the day I started playing. I had been given a guitar for my fifth birthday and when I was seven years old they showed him on Swedish TV. I started playing straight that day.

UV: Seven years old is a pretty young age to be impressed by Jimi Hendrix...
YM: I don't think so. Why?

UV: I would have thought that a seven year old wouldn't quite appreciate the sensual and psychedelic aspects of his music. But then again, maybe a seven year old can respond to the music without any preconceptions or prejudices.
YM: Yeah, sure. He was my hero - he made me think it was cool to play the guitar.

UV: Do you still feel there's a Hendrix influence in your style?
YM: Not so much now
. Everything I play comes from within - I strongly believe I'm not influenced by anyone right now. But his attitude towards everything he did is still there - the way he dressed and everything.

UV: Just trying to be true to himself?
YM: Yeah, basically. You know, I call my cat 'Fuzzy' but his full name is 'Fuzz Face Cry Baby', named after Jimi's pedals!

UV: Moving on, do you remember when you started tuning a half-step lower?
YM: I've always done that - I didn't do it on the Steeler or the Alcatrazz albums because they didn't do it. But apart from that I've always, always done it.

UV: Was it influenced by Hendrix?
YM: Oh no, I've just always done it. Did he do that? I didn't know!
***edit by me: How do you not know that when you play the music? You had to figure it out and you would have heard it being Eb... just a sidenote***

UV: You mixed your latest album in Electric Lady Studios ['Fire and Ice' - a deliberate Spinal Tap reference, we hope - DJN]. Did you chose it because of the Hendrix connection?
YM: That's right. Wouldn't you?

UV: Yeah, I'm sure I would! On your live album 'Trial by Fire/Live in Leningrad' [which shows Yngwie burning his guitar and I think we know where he got that from - DJN] you cover 'Spanish Castle Magic'. Is that one of your favourite Hendrix songs?

YM: Yeah, I love that song. That was totally spontaneous, you know, it was the first and the only time I've played it in concert. It was completely unrehearsed and the band didn't know I was going to do it! I didn't know I was going to do! [Phew - these crazy, spontaneous rock 'n' rollers - DJN]

UV: Which other Hendrix songs have you played live?
YM: I've done 'Red House' [debatable - DJN], 'Purple Haze', 'Manic Depression', 'Little Miss Lover' and 'Hey Joe'. You know, I can go into any song onstage sometimes and the band just has to follow me.

UV: You don't rehearse these songs with the band?
YM: No! I know most of his stuff and the guys in the band have all heard the songs. To do what he did on the guitar is not as difficult as it was then because guitarists learn so much quicker now - you can get books of his music and so on...


This interview was previously published in UniVibes issue 7, August 1992.


UniVibes 1992 reprinted by permission of UniVibes, International Jimi Hendrix Magazine, Coppeen, Enniskeane, County Cork, Republic Of Ireland


*************************

You mainly play something you love, otherwise you leave it on the pile of poop for others to do. Once something is loved, its inherent in your style (which is an influence). Regardless of what he says, you can hear it. Pick your arguments elsewhere, throughout this interview there is something he is not saying. Understandable when you are trying to create your niche at the time

In the malmsteen signature licks book, in the interlude section of Deja Vu... the author states that this is Malmsteen's homage to Hendrix (yeah, that black dude with the fro and the fender) and then in brackets he dares to say "one of the few guitarists Yngwie acknowledges as an influence"... my word, he dared to say it. I wonder if he got sued.

The last thing is, take a good listen.... hear past the flurry of notes, when he gets into the nitty gritty blues (aside from the many Hendrix covers he does {and he does them so well}.... dunno why he doesn't play any John Lee Hooker tracks or Muddy Waters) you can really hear it. In the above interview he's asked if he still has a Hendrix influence in his playing... "Not so much now"

Huh? Does that mean never? Does that mean he only saw this mad mississippi lynchmob escapee only burning his guitar at monterey? When there were only 3 instances of it, this is the one and only time? Yada yada yada... bulltossedsaladballs. He saw him once but dressed like him for the rest of his gigging life? More to that one I think.... hmmm
Last edited by evolucian at Aug 15, 2009,
#11
It doesnt matter if metal comes into your playing ,alot of neo-classical invloves that style ,using the harmonic and melodic minor scales are good too ,make sure you use the trademark techniques like sweeps ,pedal point licks and diminshed licks
#12
learn some of the cliche'd neoclassical licks. For example, having a static note and decending on the beat through the scale.

Like this:|--9-10-7-10-6-10-9-10-12~~|

Here's some good examples of common neoclassical ideas.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bco2RTOF384

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NMhF1aaV7Dw
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Last edited by StewieSwan at Aug 16, 2009,
#13
Yeah also stuff like =

|--------------------------------------------------
|--12---12---12----12----12---12------------
|-----15---14------------------------------------
|------------------15----14----------------------
|--------------------------------15---14---------
|--------------------------------------------------

|----8-7-8-5----8-7-8-7-5----10-9-10-9-7---10-9-10-9-7-----
|-5------------5--------------7-----------------7----------------------
|------------------------------------------------------------------------
|------------------------------------------------------------------------
|------------------------------------------------------------------------
|------------------------------------------------------------------------
#15
In addition to what everyone else has said, learn your cadences. Whenever anyone thinks "Neoclassical", diminished arpeggios always come to mind, but actual classical music and A LOT of Malmsteen's stuff is actually based around your standard major and minor chords. What makes it sound classical and not like a blues progression, are the actual chord progressions or the progressions that you are implying from your note choices (very Malmsteen). Basically, any non-chord tone pulls to the closest chord tone which is why some chords "pull" stronger to the I chord than others. Diminished 7s, Min7b5s, V, and bII chords generally pull the strongest.