#1
hello all I know your going to be super helpful and I already appreciate it so thank you.

I don't want to say my Chord knowledge is limited but, it is not really good.... (nice grammar) here is the chords I do know.

I know "All" the open chords
I know all the major's with the CAGED method
I use the same method to know 2 3 forms of minor barre chords
I know that a power chord is just a major 5th ( I hope yikes not confident know)
I know 1 form of the 7ths.
o
x
o
o
o
x
(form like that make shift tab haha)

I think I know 1 form of a 13th that is about it

I really only know the notes on E and A strings but I do know the octave tricks...

know that I look at this list I kinda think it is allot maybe the application is the problem. like I kinda freeze up on my guitar when some one asks play the c7 all though I do know that the C is on the 8th fret when typing and of course in standard tuning what do you guys think?
#2
Maybe I'm missing the point here, but if you want to broaden chord knowledge, shouldn't you learn as many chords as you can, then learn to practically apply them?
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#3
Learn how to construct the chords and other extensions, suspensions, ect. Learn how to harmonize the major scale, learn to create voicings and about inversions as well.
#4
A power chord is a root and perfect fifth (theres no such thing as a major fifth or fourth, only perfect, diminished(down half-step), and augmented(up half-step)). And it's not really a chord, because it is not "three or more different pitches played in unison".

I say learn the basic barre shapes of major, minor, dominant, diminished triads and their seventh versions. Then learn chord construction, and learn what notes will make your chord a certain chord (for C7 take your Cmaj barre shape and replace a doubled note (such as the root or fifth) with the minor seventh.)

Make sure you know how to read the chord names and how they're spelt (C7= 1 3 5 b7, Cdim= 1 b3 b5 bb7)

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Last edited by Ribcage at Aug 14, 2009,
#5
wouldnt it be pointless to memorize every chord? if you knew how to form them you wouldnt need to sit there and memorize them, am i right? i really dunno
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#6
Quote by bass-man9712
wouldnt it be pointless to memorize every chord? if you knew how to form them you wouldnt need to sit there and memorize them, am i right? i really dunno



Well, if you were sight reading it would be easier to see the chord name and already know a chord voicing, but learning to construct chords is also very important to know.
#7
Learning how to construct chords is key. Then you can look at chords you know/learn and change a note or two and create new chords. It's easier to learn this way than to learn a bunch of random chord patterns. Just my opinion.