#1
When I play guitar, I often have my fingers at a bit of an angle, not parallel to the frets, but pointed towards myself. This is especially apparent when I am playing a riff that runs up consecutive strings. Many of the better guitarists I've seen play have their fingers almost perfectly in line with the frets, even when they are jumping from string to string. Will this affect my playing, is it worth taking the time to train my hand to play otherwise, or does it not make a difference as long as I can play?

Thanks
-Andrew
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#2
Quote by chaos13
When I play guitar, I often have my fingers at a bit of an angle, not parallel to the frets, but pointed towards myself. This is especially apparent when I am playing a riff that runs up consecutive strings. Many of the better guitarists I've seen play have their fingers almost perfectly in line with the frets, even when they are jumping from string to string. Will this affect my playing, is it worth taking the time to train my hand to play otherwise, or does it not make a difference as long as I can play?

Thanks
-Andrew


Generally speaking, it's better if your fingers are mostly parallel to the fret bars. Try adjusting the height and angle your guitar is at. Some places will be more comfortable. For instance, I always have my guitar up quite high with a relaxed angle and its the most comfortable position for me.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#4
I used to have this problem. I never realized how much it held my playing back. When I was learning to sweep, I changed my ways and wow it helped a ton. But, keep doing whats comfortable for you, and if you want to try and changer= your technique, all the power to ya.
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#5
When you're fingers are parallel to the fretboard, they will dampen the strings higher than the one you're fretting and stopping them from ringing out and causing unwanted noise. This is essential for playing with high gain, and it's useful for when you're sweep-picking.