#1
Has anyone practiced scales in Drop C?

So far the scales that i've been practiceing in drop C don't seem to have any set pattern to it and I just wanted to know if anyone has written or heard a solo/improv. in Drop C.
#2
Quote by Blckspawn
Has anyone practiced scales in Drop C?

So far the scales that i've been practiceing in drop C don't seem to have any set pattern to it and I just wanted to know if anyone has written or heard a solo/improv. in Drop C.



Maybe I'm wrong here, but surely it's the same as soloing in standard, but with one tune detuned? The same scales will work as with standard but with a 2-fret shift on the low C, unless your problem is actually with scales in general and not just in drop-C
#3
I usually just play the same scales, only move them to the proper location on the fretboard?
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#4
dude its just like standard but down 1 step so move ur standard scale up 2 frets but on ur low c u half to move it up 4 frets so theres a weird shift but its pretty easy
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#6
The patterns in drop C are exactly the same as in drop D, which are exactly the same as E standard, except notes played on the low E which need to be played up 2 frets (or down 2 frets on all strings besides the low E)
#7
Ok, I'm not quite sure what to call this tuning:

D - High String
A
F
C
G
C - Low String

This is the tuning i'm talking about.
#8
Do you mean high string as in lowest note?

If not, then that IS drop C...and it's exactly what everyone has said, it's one step down, two on the low, shift 2 frets and 4 frets respectively and you've got the same scales...
#9
Quote by Blckspawn
Ok, I'm not quite sure what to call this tuning:

D - High String
A
F
C
G
C - Low String

This is the tuning i'm talking about.


We all know what tuning you're talking about. What you're asking just doesn't make any sense. The same scales exist in every tuning on pretty much any pitched instrument.
#11
Just move the scales to the proper location.


/thread.
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#12
Quote by tushmeister
Do you mean high string as in lowest note?

If not, then that IS drop C...and it's exactly what everyone has said, it's one step down, two on the low, shift 2 frets and 4 frets respectively and you've got the same scales...


The high string is the 1st string and the Lowest string is the 6th string.
#13
Quote by Macabre_Turtle
We all know what tuning you're talking about. What you're asking just doesn't make any sense. The same scales exist in every tuning on pretty much any pitched instrument.


But their seems to be a noticeable pattern in standard tuning than in Drop C.
#14
I said screw it and tuned to C and occasion down to drop B its mad heavy gotta get some 12s or 13s for strings though
#15
Quote by Blckspawn
But their seems to be a noticeable pattern in standard tuning than in Drop C.


Let me establish this as fact first.

What note is your THINNEST string? If it's D, you're in Drop C

In which case the patterns are EXACTLY the same, but moved down 2 frets on every string but 4 on the low C.

There's really nothing complicated about it...
#16
Quote by tushmeister
Let me establish this as fact first.

What note is your THINNEST string? If it's D, you're in Drop C

In which case the patterns are EXACTLY the same, but moved down 2 frets on every string but 4 on the low C.

There's really nothing complicated about it...


Yes, the thinnest string is in fact D.

Do you think you could give me an example here so I can see what you mean?
#17
This really shouldn't be that complicated - assuming you have tuned your guitar right (with CGCFAD from thickest to thinnest) then all the same scale patterns should apply apart from on the thickest string. If you wish to move to the correct key relative to standard simply move your positions 2 frets up.

Why did you tune to drop C in the first place?
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#18
Quote by Blckspawn
Yes, the thinnest string is in fact D.

Do you think you could give me an example here so I can see what you mean?


Can you play pentatonic major in E? In the lowest position, so using open strings in standard.

Now move down 2 frets one each string, and 4 on the lowest. You're now playing the exact same scale.

It literally couldn't be easier.
#19
Quote by doive
This really shouldn't be that complicated - assuming you have tuned your guitar right (with CGCFAD from thickest to thinnest) then all the same scale patterns should apply apart from on the thickest string. If you wish to move to the correct key relative to standard simply move your positions 2 frets up.

Why did you tune to drop C in the first place?


Cause I was playing some SOAD songs. I just started playing around with that tuning and I liked the sound so I kept it there.
#20
Quote by tushmeister
Can you play pentatonic major in E? In the lowest position, so using open strings in standard.

Now move down 2 frets one each string, and 4 on the lowest. You're now playing the exact same scale.

It literally couldn't be easier.


ok, i see it now.
#23
Quote by Blckspawn
Why?


It will throw you off if all you're thinking about is scale patterns on the fretboard.
#24
Basically, you have your fretboard in E standard and you're looking at the scale pattern for the G major scale, starting on the third fret of the low E string.

e|---|-O-|-O-|----|----|---|---|
B|---|----|-O-|----|-O-|---|---|
G|---|-O-|----|-O-|-O-|---|---|
D|---|-O-|----|-O-|-O-|---|---|
A|---|-O-|-O-|----|-O-|---|---|
E|---|----|-O-|----|-O-|---|---|

When you lower the tuning to Drop C, you drop the low E string down 2 steps (4 flats) and rest of the strings down one step (2 flats). This makes the G major scale look like this:

D|---|---|---|-O-|-O-|----|----|----|----|---|
A|---|---|---|----|-O-|----|-O-|----|----|---|
F|---|---|---|-O-|----|-O-|-O-|----|----|---|
C|---|---|---|-O-|----|-O-|-O-|----|----|---|
G|---|---|---|-O-|-O-|----|-O-|----|----|---|
C|---|---|---|----|----|----|-O-|----|-O-|---|

In essence, you play the same pattern up two frets, except for the notes on the lowest string, which you play 4 frets up.

Hopefully this makes sense.

Also, sorry about the double post.
Last edited by Kerahl at Aug 16, 2009,
#26
Because guitar is a transposing instrument, if you tune it to C standard and want to solo in C MINOR, you will need to play an E MINOR scale according to your fretboard notes (not according to pitch), since C standard tuning is 4 whole steps down from E standard. The scale patterns will be the same.

If you're in drop C and want to play a C MINOR scale you need to play an E MINOR scale on the low E string, and a D MINOR scale on the other 5 strings.

If you want to notate a C standard tuned guitar, you write the tuning on the sheet music and notate it as if it was tuned to E standard. Whenever someone wants to play a passage, they will see a note G on the staff which they play on, say, the 5th fret D string though it will not sound a G since the guitar is tuned 4 steps down from what is notated, they will actually be playing a D#.

All other instruments will be playing in pitch key, so C MINOR in this case.