#1
i got a single cut 245 from PRS and it comes with prs vintage pickups which are fine... but it doesnt sound like a les paul as much as i want it to.

was thinking about putting classic 57s in or burstbuckers..
would that make it more les paul sounding?

if you're asking why i dont just get a les paul is because i cant stand the neck whether it be 50s 60s asymetric...dont like any of them..the prs neck is just yummy.
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#2
BBs and '57s is not going to make the PRS sound like a les paul, if you want a les paul tone out of a PRS, you need to get something less transparent and yield a fatter overall tone. BBs can sound thin and bright, '57s are warmer and smoother, but still have that thin kind of sound on high notes, it works well in les pauls which can supply a little more low end, but it won't sound the same in brighter, thinner sounding guitars.

My suggestion for a les paul tone are WCR Fillmores, they are really popular in PRS guitars because they will fatten everything up.
#3
I don't see why your PRS wouldn't sound more typically Gibson Les Paul-ish if you switched in some thicker-toned pickups. To the best of my understanding, the PRS SC245 is a single cutaway, mahogany body, carved maple top, set mahogany neck with rosewood fretboard guitar. The only real difference between it an a Gibson LP is the PRS has a single piece wraparound bridge while the Gibson LP would have a Tune-O-Matic and stopbar combination bridge, and that is probably the only thing that's making any difference to your tone as wraparound bridges do tend to give a slightly brighter tone than ToM/stopbar combination bridges. Even then it's only a slight difference that most people wouldn't be able to spot.

That said, don't go with '57 Classics. Ever heard Epiphone's generic stock pickup? They're made to the same spec as the Gibson '57 Classics and the only thing the Classics have over the Epiphone version is the Gibson ones are slightly clearer. They're really not good pickups, and if what you want is the more stereotypically thick Gibson tone, they'll only make your problems worse.

BurstBucker #1/#2/#3 pickups are fairly good, but you've got to be careful with your selection or they will end up being unusually bright. BurstBucker Pro pickups are simply terrible in every way, don't touch them.


It would help if you could explain in what way you don't think your guitar is sounding 'Les Paul-ish' enough. Is it too bright (I'm guessing is probably the case)? Does it sound too mellow? Are the current pickups to high output, are they too low output? Too much bass, not enough bass? If you can better explain in what way you think your guitar's tone is lacking and how you'd like it to end up, we can give you more useful advice.
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#4
I'd look to see if you can find any of the PRS 1957/2008 pups. They can get pricey though. There made from 50's PAF machines which still had the original 50's wrie supposedly. Well, according to this video they do.
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#5
Quote by gstacey1
I'd look to see if you can find any of the PRS 1957/2008 pups. They can get pricey though. There made from 50's PAF machines which still had the original 50's wrie supposedly. Well, according to this video they do.

I second this, there is even a replacement policy for new PRSs now. Any new PRS you buy, just mail it off to PRS Maryland and they will change the pickups to whatever PRS brand pickups you want for free. SInce your PRS is likely too old to take advantage of this, try emailing them asking if you can pay for a replacement. PRS usually does not sell their 57/08's, but I bet if you ask you could probably send them your PRS for them to do the change for a nominal fee.

Quote by MrFlibble
I don't see why your PRS wouldn't sound more typically Gibson Les Paul-ish if you switched in some thicker-toned pickups. To the best of my understanding, the PRS SC245 is a single cutaway, mahogany body, carved maple top, set mahogany neck with rosewood fretboard guitar. The only real difference between it an a Gibson LP is the PRS has a single piece wraparound bridge while the Gibson LP would have a Tune-O-Matic and stopbar combination bridge, and that is probably the only thing that's making any difference to your tone as wraparound bridges do tend to give a slightly brighter tone than ToM/stopbar combination bridges. Even then it's only a slight difference that most people wouldn't be able to spot.


You forget a major difference, the finish. Gibsons have a Nitrocellulose finish, while PRSs have a polyurathane/laquer mix (I think they give a poly undercoat with a laquer finish, but it may be reversed. My memory is not the best). While, in my opinion, Nitrocellulose finish is the best finish possible for a guitar, the PRS finish gives a guitar that glossy mirror-like quality which is a main aesthetic of a PRS.
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#6
Quote by MrFlibble

It would help if you could explain in what way you don't think your guitar is sounding 'Les Paul-ish' enough.


thanks for you answer btw.
um right now to me my prs sounds a bit too..mid ranged and not bright enough to be honestly (i was surprised when you said that sc245 was suppose to be brighter than LPs).

I was thinking actually before changing pickups that i would try taking off the covers on the pups cuz ive heard it brightens the tone and doesnt sound as muffed which by the sound of it ..its what im looking for (but im not 100% sure)

i want to have the "les paul" tone when using my prs (it does sound KINDA like a les paul but it has way more mid range and less treble)
27mMoV31II7.a2
#7
Quote by Antimage27
thanks for you answer btw.
um right now to me my prs sounds a bit too..mid ranged and not bright enough to be honestly (i was surprised when you said that sc245 was suppose to be brighter than LPs).

I was thinking actually before changing pickups that i would try taking off the covers on the pups cuz ive heard it brightens the tone and doesnt sound as muffed which by the sound of it ..its what im looking for (but im not 100% sure)

i want to have the "les paul" tone when using my prs (it does sound KINDA like a les paul but it has way more mid range and less treble)
I said a les paul generally sounds fatter, they have a deeper sounding, more rounded low end, but that doesn't necessarily mean that the PRS is a brighter guitar. Les pauls can get very bright, but there is a difference between being darker sounding and being fatter sounding. They sometimes go hand in hand, but not always.

One thing you could always do is check the value of your control pots, 500k is your typical standard value for les pauls, but Gibsons can sometimes come with pots out of spec w/ a lower value. Idk about PRS's... Taking the covers off will not make a significant difference. Pickup covers are made of nickel silver which don't affect the pickup's magnetic field themselves, but sometimes the plating (which is typically nickel or chrome) does, but does so to a very small degree. I've experienced pretty much zero difference between on and off.

What you're considering as the "les paul tone" is important here, you have to throw something out as an example. What I'm hearing from you in "too much mids, not enough treble" doesn't mean much. I mean...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3QgDdCZYwJU

That's VERY mid heavy and not a huge amount of brightness either, but to my ears, it's still very much the les paul w/ PAF tone. I personally just typically think of the les paul tone as that of a dual humbucker les paul with PAFs, which can take on a huge variety of sounds, so long as it maintains certain... fingerprints.
Last edited by al112987 at Aug 16, 2009,
#8
I would not change a thing on that guitar, they are fine just the way they are.
#9
Quote by sstony
I would not change a thing on that guitar, they are fine just the way they are.
but the TS might not like the way things are on that guitar. Objectively my guitar is just fine the way it is, well setup, good upgrades and a set of relatively high end boutique pickups, and yet I still go through different cap values, different pickups and different magnets in pickups to tweak my tone to where i want it to be. There's nothing wrong with playing with your sound a little to hopefully get something to better suit what you want.
#10
why not get a les paul?

i mean you could probably trade that guitar for a decent les paul
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#11
Quote by williamdllr
why not get a les paul?

i mean you could probably trade that guitar for a decent les paul

im pretty sure i mentioned this in the topic .

reason is because i dont like the les paul neck that much plus the accesbility sucks for me because i have pretty short fingers...
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#12
Quote by williamdllr
why not get a les paul?

i mean you could probably trade that guitar for a decent les paul

You have no idea how good his guitar really is do you ??????????????
Trade for a les paul,,,, please.
#13
kranoscorp brings up a valid point, the finish is different, and the poly finish of the PRS will dampen the tone of the guitar somewhat. However the difference in tone between finishes is minimal, and any dampening of the tone from the finish will be 'corrected' by the brighter tone of the PRS' bridge, so I think it balances out and isn't an issue.

Quote by Antimage27
thanks for you answer btw.
um right now to me my prs sounds a bit too..mid ranged and not bright enough to be honestly (i was surprised when you said that sc245 was suppose to be brighter than LPs).
In that case, there are a few pickups I can think of that will help brighten up the top-end of your tone.
BurstBucker #1/#2/#3 pickups (not the 'Pro' model) have quite bright tones. The #1 is the lowest output with the best clarity, the brightest tone and is best in the neck position, the #2 is the most balanced and can be put in either position, and the #3 is over-wound with slightly more bass and is best in the bridge. They purposefully don't make every BurstBucker exactly the same but in general the #1 is low vintage output, the #3 is modern output and the #2 is right in the middle. I have all three: a #2 and #3 in my Epiphone LP and a #1 and #2 in my Gibson. I've also tried a #1 in the neck of a Telecaster. The #1 is a really great pickup - very clear, bright and articulate. It's bright and responsive enough that I can get pinch harmonics ringing as clearly and as loudly as if I was using the bridge pickup, even with just average or low gain. I can't promise it'll fix your problems and as it is a Gibson pickup it is a bit on the expensive side - I don't know the Canadian prices, but over here they're about £70 for the versions without covers, which is about £20 more than the typical Seymour Duncan or DiMarzio pickup - but if you are feeling adventurous they're worth checking out. The BurstBucker #2 might also be worth giving some thought to. The #3 will probably be too thick-toned for you.

There's also a number of Seymour Duncan and DiMarzio pickups that may also help give you a brighter tone with more treble response:
  • DiMarzio Humbucker From Hell, a humbucker that they made to purposefully be as bright and almost singlecoil-like as possible. Sounds like an overwound P-90 pickup, it'll certainly brighten up your tone but the drawback is it might be too bright.
  • SD Seth Lover model. A general PAF copy, very similar to the Burstbucker #1 but Seymour Duncan make these to a more uniform consistency than Gibson make their BurstBuckers. Some people say they're even brighter than the BurstBuckers in fact, I've only used it once - in a Les Paul Junior - and it did seem brighter, but that could just be because of the guitar it was in. It should cost less too.
  • SD Alnico II Pro, low output with a high resonant peak. It's most famous user is of course Slash of Guns N Roses/Velvet Revolver, but he rolls his tone control way down usually so he's actually not a good example of how it sounds. It can get surprisingly bright. Might be a good choice to put in the bridge of your guitar with one of the others in the neck.
  • SD Pearly Gates. Listen to any ZZ Top record - this pickup is made to replicate Billy Gibbons' pickups. Though it's bright and very, very responsive, it's also got slightly pumped bass. Probably not the best option to you, but worth considering if everything else fails.
  • SD Jazz. This is a hard one for me to recommend because I tried one and didn't like it, but then again the guitar I tried it in was a weird basswood guitar with a Floyd Rose so it probably wasn't a fair test. Everyone else says the Jazz is one of the brightest, cleanest neck pickups on the market. I can't vouch for it myself but like the Pearly Gates, it's one to keep in mind.
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#14
I'm still not exactly sure of what exactly the TS's idea of "les paul sound" is but I really don't think Burstbuckers are going to do it, the ill defined low end of a Burstbucker in a PRS is going to make it sound stringy and thin. A normal PAF style offering is just going to accentuate the differences in natural tone between the PRS and a les paul.

Both of these are really popular in prs guitars for folks who generally like to use les pauls

http://www.wcrguitar.com/fillmore.html
http://www.wcrguitar.com/godwood.html

The first set have pretty strong mids, but I mean... it's just me, but part of me associates a certain type of slightly nasal midrangey, especially upper midrangey honk with the les paul tone.

The second set have a more scooped EQ and slightly softer highs and more lows. They're still bright and clear but they're definitely a fatter sounding unit than just about any PAF style pickup you ever hear but still keep that overall kind of voicing.

However are a tad pricey...
Last edited by al112987 at Aug 16, 2009,
#15
Well, OP said his guitar sounds too mid-heavy and not bright enough, so whether that's 'the Les Paul tone' or not is basically irrelevant, he wants less mid-emphasis and more treble response. The BurstBuckers and other similar pickups like them will do that.


EDIT: or at least they should do that, in theory. Of course, every guitar is different, every pickup is slightly different, and of course your amp settings and what (if any) pedals you use make a huge difference too.
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#16
i think i may get the alnico 2 pro
the one slash uses ^^
but ill do more research
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#17
Quote by Antimage27
i think i may get the alnico 2 pro
the one slash uses ^^
but ill do more research
Don't get them because Slash has them. I have never heard anyone get Slash's tone without a GOOD sounding les paul and vintage style Marshall, and I've heard several good Slash impersonations done with a good sounding les paul and SJ without the A2pros (but with similar A2 magnet, low output humbuckers). They get certain characteristics of Slash's tone, mainly a similar sounding attack, especially on the neck pickup, but in terms of overall sound, they depend very much on the tone of your guitar and amp.

A2pro is going to be very clean, transparent and have a very squishy kind of pick attack and syrupy type of sound.

Is that what you are looking for? Slash's tone has definite characteristics of the A2 pros, most notably in his pick attack, you can hear the soft and spongy response, the SCOM is a good example of the neck pickup with the tone all the way up and the solo is a good example of the neck with the tone knocked back a notch or two. Don't listen too much to how Slash's tone is EQ'ed, that's mostly the amp and guitar, low output A2 pickups are by nature bright, transparent and a tad thin sounding, and they will let the tone of the guitar through better than just about any other type of pickup. What you are hearing in Slash's tone is 47.5% guitar, 47.5 amp and the 5% pickup with the pickup contributing mostly to the sound of the pick attack.

A good thing to know is what you consider the "les paul" tone that you have in mind. There are a ton of sounds out there that people associate with the les paul tone...
Last edited by al112987 at Aug 17, 2009,
#18
I wouldn't completely write off the Alnico II Pros because as I said (and I stand by it), they do have a high resonant peak and have a naturally very clear tone. However as al112987 points out, that transparancy also means they rely a lot on every other aspect of your gear being top-notch and they certainly won't get you Slash's tone by themselves.

I stand by that the BurstBuckers #1 (neck), SD Seth Lover (neck or bridge) or Dimarzio Humbucker From Hell (neck) would be the best choices, going on what you've told us so far.
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#19
ok thanks for you guy's answers
ill definately think it over
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