#2
thats very very cool. a bit expensive at $100, but honestly i would expect it to be more. i may have to try this! could be great for practicing scales and keys.

plus, it looks like a world of opportunity if you can figure out a good way to incorporate it into your playing. i just wondering how well it really forces down the string, and how it clamps onto the back of the neck... it's a pretty bulky piece of plastic there.

EDIT: and obviously it's a bit expensive considering you could just tune your own guitar to whatever you wanted. but still, very cool idea. it looks like fretting on the 5th fret could be a pain though, even the guy in the demo video looks to have a little trouble at one point.
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Last edited by LifeIsABullet16 at Aug 15, 2009,
#4
i've never had a problem with strings breaking with normal capos, but it really depends on what holds the string down with this model... a normal capo puts pressure all the way across a fret, but with this holding down individual strings i really wonder what exactly its using. if it's a piece of metal pushing the string down, thats no good. but if it's a rubber stopper or something it could work alright.
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#6
It'd be pretty cool, but for playing live or just on your own, it's maybe beneficial to just use a regular capo and work out transpositions etc. I mean, you don't want to just become dependant on the voice capo.

Of course, this is especially because it costs $100.
#7
If I got it I wasnt going to become dependent on it I just think it would be something cool to fool around with when Im bored and to see what kind of different sounds I could get out of it
#8
As cool as an idea as that is, I think it would be cheaper to buy multiple "Third-Hand Capos" and you could probably get the same effect, and you could spread them apart more too...however, I don't know how healthy that would be for the guitar though, or if it wouldn't matter.
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#9
Quote by clayonfire
As cool as an idea as that is, I think it would be cheaper to buy multiple "Third-Hand Capos" and you could probably get the same effect, and you could spread them apart more too...however, I don't know how healthy that would be for the guitar though, or if it wouldn't matter.


from looking at the website it has some kind of strips that attach it to the wood but that may leave residue or however you spell it which could probably cause problems when playing without it but idk
#10
I'd like to know what it sounds like compared to an open stringed guitar or a regular capo.
#11
Quite cool thing. I'd rather categorize that thing as a gadget. But it's definitely a very accesible tool, for getting away with open tunings.

Personally I'd prefer to just do the retuning and have extra four frets at my disposal. Also the price is pretty steep.

It just annoys me that I can't buy any third-hand capo around where I live...
#12
Wow, that is indeed a pretty cool gimmick of which I've never heard before. I wonder how necessary it is, though.
#13
That is REALLY cool. I mean, its easily one of the most creative (and effective) tools I've seen that you can buy for a guitar. I mean, sure, you COULD just retune, but playing a live show you ideally can just switch tunings instantly.
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#15
Hi All,

The most common comments I receive is reaction to the price. While sales have been good, and I have been selling a lot at the $99 price point, I have decided to make Voice more accessible to a broader audience by lowering the price to $59. Note that Voice is still made in the USA, which is partly why it costs so much.

Note: I am the sole creator, owner and operator of Voice and the website. Everything. I've invested my whole life savings as well as a year of my life so far, and I am still losing money as I try to get this business going. The sales and response have been encouraging, but I've only been selling for a little over a month. If sales accelerate with this lower price point then I will leave it there. Otherwise I will have to raise the price back up.

All the best!
#16
Quote by therealtater
from looking at the website it has some kind of strips that attach it to the wood but that may leave residue or however you spell it which could probably cause problems when playing without it but idk


The Mount Strips are applied to the Voice Capo unit so that it will fit snugly many different width guitar necks.
They are not applied to the Guitar!


More info here:
Fine Tuning with Mount Strips
#18
I thought i was the only one to see this!!!!
Im really digging the idea, anyone know if it is easy to switch on and off is my only concern?
#19
GENIUS!!!!!!. and thats awesome. sure your missing some frets but it leaves something for imagination.
#20
Wow, cool to see the owner and creator of this coming around to answer the questions and concerns of the consumer. I applaud you for that good sir

If I had a use for it (as in if I were a more advanced player that could justify it) I would be somewhere between more than likely and most definately buying one.

Quote by Some random k1d
I thought i was the only one to see this!!!!
Im really digging the idea, anyone know if it is easy to switch on and off is my only concern?

Not sure if you mean to take it off or to switch off the individual pads, but to switch off the individual pads it seems from the video to just be like a retractable pen. Push down and it pops back up.
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Last edited by Natrone at Sep 8, 2009,
#21
What's up with the Trigger Pads and Shims?
The Trigger Pads and Shims are what allows Voice to create a clean and pure tone, as if the string was being held down by a real finger.
By doing research with a company that provides materials for Biomedical Equipment, we were able to isolate a high density polyurethane foam that simulates the fleshy tip of a finger.
Through extended research we also discovered that the use of a thin polyester shim over this material can help to eliminate string buzz in certain chord configurations. The same way a calloused finger helps to hold down a string.
By Combining these two materials, Voice is able to create a pure tone with each trigger.
All of the triggers should have shims applied during the initial setup.
You can then add more or remove them if necessary depending on your guitars response.

Ok, from what the website said there should be no problem with strings breaking if you read the paragraph taken from the Voicecapo website.-
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#22
What a joke. Go for it if you don't mind sacrificing 1/4th of your fretboard in favor of that tank. Naaa, I'll pass.
#23
You can always use the next string over, although you do lose the first four frets on your E string. Sounds really cool though.
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#24
It seems interesting, a good idea at least. I'd be interested in trying it, but I'd rather wrap and bend my head around how I should tune my strings to give a chord that last note that it's begging so desperately for.