#1
Alright I've had my SG tuned down to C#, drop c, and even drop A for some songs for ever. But I've always had the problem of some strings(mainly G string) sounding too sharp or flat when I actually press them down. I'll tune them perfect for an open string, but when fretting, things go flat/sharp. I use 12's for this. And of course with these strings tuned down low, the amount of force I use to fret the string greatly determines if it will go sharp or not. I've tuned all my strings slightly flat, but they'll still sometimes sound off. Is there a better way to tune for drop tuning? Or should I focus more on fretting more lightly? Thanks in advance.
Quote by rancidryan
Do they come with heroin because I heard thats the only reason Dave Mustaine used them


"The power of the riff compels me"
Bury Me In Smoke
#2
Your intonation is off, If you change tunings drastically, Like C# to Drop A, then it might mess with it. It's easy to fix on your guitar.



Quote by Sticky
Intonation SETTING INTONATION: from icepoint...

Most electric guitars provide individual string length adjustment for setting intonation. Fine tuning this length insures that your guitar plays in tune all the way up and down the neck.

Using an electronic tuner, tune your guitar to pitch. One string at a time, play the harmonic at the 12th fret and then play the fretted 12th fret note. If the fretted note is sharper than the harmonic, increase the string length slightly until both notes register the same on your tuner. If the fretted note is flat compared to the harmonic shorten the string length slightly until both notes register the same on your tuner. Repeat the procedure on all strings until the harmonic and the fretted notes are the same just to add, if you can't get the harmonic to match the fretted 12th, compare the open string note and the fretted 12th note. also, be sure to tune the open string after each intonation screw adjustment.





Your Bridge
You can call me Aaron.


♠♣♥♦
Out on parole, any more instances of plum text and I get put back in...
#3
if you're going as low as A, then i think you're better off buying a set of 7 string guitar strings and discarding the high e. but i think you would have to adjust your nut
#4
Quote by biga29
Your intonation is off, If you change tunings drastically, Like C# to Drop A, then it might mess with it. It's easy to fix on your guitar.






Your Bridge



Killer sig man.
Overkill for the mother f*cking win!
#5
Thanks. So just mess with the bridge depending on what harmonics I get. And increase string length I'm guessing means moving the saddle back slightly?
Quote by rancidryan
Do they come with heroin because I heard thats the only reason Dave Mustaine used them


"The power of the riff compels me"
Bury Me In Smoke
#6
Quote by mashizz
if you're going as low as A, then i think you're better off buying a set of 7 string guitar strings and discarding the high e. but i think you would have to adjust your nut


I got the nut sanded down already to fit higher gauges(That sounded wrong). But I may try a 7 string set. Thanks
Quote by rancidryan
Do they come with heroin because I heard thats the only reason Dave Mustaine used them


"The power of the riff compels me"
Bury Me In Smoke
#7
I've had the same problem with my 7 string. Heavier gauge strings fixed it, for me at least.
#8
Quote by xMetalCoreKingx
Killer sig man.
Overkill for the mother f*cking win!


What is this "Overkill"?
You can call me Aaron.


♠♣♥♦
Out on parole, any more instances of plum text and I get put back in...
#10
Quote by xMetalCoreKingx
Never mind.
I thought you were an Overkill because
"Old enough to know better, too young to care" are the first lines of
"Nothing to Die For" by Overkill from their "Years of Decay" album.
You should check it out.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=twPyrKtGZZA

Nah, it's from Anberlin . I'll check it out though.
You can call me Aaron.


♠♣♥♦
Out on parole, any more instances of plum text and I get put back in...