#1
I am on the final lap of painting my guitar, It looks really nice but I need that shine on it. I have sprayed about 5 coats of gloss enamel on it and it is shiny but not like the guitars you buy in a shop.. I've realized that the gloss enamel isn't going to do the job for me..

I am in need of a lacquer that is affordable and preferably be bought in stores like Woolworths, Bi-Lo or Local Paint shops..

It is muchly appreciated if you post me a brand or give me some tips on how to get that shiny finish..

Thanks
#2
Well firstly, sand down your whole guitar and redo it, because I really doubt you're going to find a lacquer that is compatible with your previous coats of enamel.

Secondly, do a little research on how to properly refinish an instrument, something you evidently failed to do the first time around.

Thirdly, take this to the ultimate refinishing thread where it really belongs, and scope that first page long and hard.

And finally, any lacquer will get the job done, and while I'm not familiar with your brands, look for Duplicolor or Krylon, I've had great results with both.

God Albino Rhino helps those noobs who help themselves.

Good luck.

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#3
No, I am not stripping the guitar down.. I have an offer for it to be bought for around about $800.AUD in a few days time.. Pretty good deal for the first guitar I've designed eh . I actually do alot of designing on t-shirts, shoes, hats etc etc. I believe the lacquer will look fine over the enamel.. The gloss enamel has added some shine to it but no where as thick as you do when you by them.. We'll see how it turns out when I do put lacquer over the top of it.
#4
I'm sure you believe it will work wonderfully.

Science disagrees.

However, go buy a can of clear gloss lacquer, try it out, and tell me what happens. Once you apply the lacquer you will need to buff/polish it to a shine.
Enjoi <--- Friend me
Quote by Scowmoo
Otter, you're my new god.
#5
Its not an absolute that lacquer cant go over enamel. But its best to test first before shooting the whole thing. As for that shine you see on a factory guitar. It requires more than just putting paint on. There's alot of polishing that goes into it.
#6
I'm sure his customer will be thrilled when the paint separates a few months after he buys it. I'm not trying to be a dick here, it happened to me and I'm just trying to save you a lot of wasted time and effort.
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Quote by Scowmoo
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#7
Quote by Albino_Rhino
I'm sure his customer will be thrilled when the paint separates a few months after he buys it. I'm not trying to be a dick here, it happened to me and I'm just trying to save you a lot of wasted time and effort.



It really does depend, actually. Just because all the lacquer cans you've ever used said "lacquer" on the front doesn't mean they have the same formula...if you build dry over top of odd-matched finishes it can work. Not in all cases, but it truly can.


In other news, yes, you CAN get "that shine" from enamel, you just don't know how to do it. Do all the research like Albino Rhino suggested, especailly on ReRanch.com if you're a beginner, and learn how to wet sand and polish. I've done enamel finishes before, and they were as good or nicer than what you see in factories...this orange thing was one that I did in enamel:

#8
I discovered if you give it a light sanding with Wet&Dry sandpaper after each coat of enamel it comes up like glass.. I am going to do this every 5 hours or so...
#9
Quote by Wizzle
I discovered if you give it a light sanding with Wet&Dry sandpaper after each coat of enamel it comes up like glass.. I am going to do this every 5 hours or so...


DOnt do it after each layer...god, how this got around I don't know.

Anyway. If you have several coats of enamel on it...just start wet sanding it.

Get some P1200, P2000 and P2500 wet and dry paper.

Get a flexible foam sanding block.

Warm water with some washing up liquid in it.

Soak the P1200 in the water for 20 mins before use.

Sand the whole guitar using an X pattern, with the paper wrapped around the block.

By X pattern I mean, first go //// then go \\\\\\.

The block is what knocks down the orange peel and levels the surface.

Stay away from the sharp edges. Do those carefully by hand, (not on the block) and go over them (up and over) rather than along them. Be aware that paint builds much thinner on the edges. Just touch the edges up with the wet and dry.

Have a bowl of clean water with a sponge or cloth in it and wipe off the crap as you go, so you can see how things are progressing.

Move up through the grades. It takes time, but it is worth it.

After the P2500, rub two bits of P2500 together, so they smooth out. This is about P3000. Do it again.

Now wash the guitar down. You should have the beginnings of a dull sheen.

Now you need, ideally a small hand held polisher (no faster than 1400 RPM) and some finishing compound.

You don't want actual buffing compound as you need to knwo what you are buying, some are very course. NO T-CUT!

If you can, buy some "Meguiars Scratch X 2.0" or "Farecla G10".

Apply that by hand or with the polisher, with a foam pad. Meguiars also sell foam pads for application by hand.

You also want some Microfibre cloths for buffing up. Then you wnat something like AutoGlym Super Resin Polish...wack a few coats of that on.

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