#1
is it dangerous to tune flatwounds gauge
G: 0.045" (1.14 mm)
D: 0.065" (1.65 mm)
A: 0.080" (2.03 mm)
E: 0.100" (2.54 mm)
B: 0.132" (3.35 mm)

to (lowest first) C#, G#, C#, F#, B

?
'If I were not a physicist, I would probably be a musician. I often think in music. I live my daydreams in music. I see my life in terms of music.' Albert Einstein
#2
According to the tension calculator that's going to give you about 45 pounds on the low C# which is okay, BUT with the higher strings you'll be going up to 80 pounds which is probably not recommended (normal playing tension seems to be around 40-60 pounds).

I'm not a guitar tech, but I think you shouldn't tune that high with those strings.

J.
Last edited by Sewe Dae at Aug 16, 2009,
#4
He's probably in a band that plays in C# standard and he doesn't use any notes lower than C#.

I'd suggest buying a light gauge 4 string set and then get a single heavy gauge E string for the lowest string.
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#6
Quote by Royal Celebi
I would just tune it to G#C#G#C#F# and get the lows, unless the high B is very necessary.

thats what im doing at the moment, and the low G# sounds like crap.
'If I were not a physicist, I would probably be a musician. I often think in music. I live my daydreams in music. I see my life in terms of music.' Albert Einstein
#8
Quote by Deliriumbassist
It'll sound like crap because your amp can't handle that low, you haven't set the instrument up properly, or both. A low B string with gauge .135 will happily do G#.


I notice that a .135 is the second fattest string that D'Addario sells (the .145 being the biggest). Also, bands like Meshuggah and Mudvayne all manage to get their basses down to F# (that is, a fourth below a 5-strings low B) using guages like .135 and .145. I'm not sure how they set up their basses to not be totally unplayable though; AFAIK the only two ways to get a lower frequency sound is a) make the string longer (i.e. longer scale) and b) make the string larger in diameter. If you're playing a 34" scale bass the only thing you can really do it put on thicker strings, but it looks like there aren't many thicker ones than a .135...

J.
#9

comes as standard with a .175 F# string
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#10
That's a big string. The set's apparently really expensive though. Do you know if anyone else makes strings larger than .145?

EDIT: I see Conklin makes some huge strings too (down to .194!!!)... can't be very practical... but it's one way of solving the low G# problem.

J.
Last edited by Sewe Dae at Aug 17, 2009,
#11
sheeeet... think of how high your action would have to be for a .194 string to not buzz.

I'd want a custom-built 40" scale too
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Okay guys, I have a confession to make. Not really a confession since it's something that's been bugging me for awhile but I've always been in denial about it.

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#12
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I'd suggest buying a light gauge 4 string set and then get a single heavy gauge E string for the lowest string.


yeah this seems the best way to go.
cheers all : )
'If I were not a physicist, I would probably be a musician. I often think in music. I live my daydreams in music. I see my life in terms of music.' Albert Einstein