#1
I'm going into my senior year now and i've been playing guitar for about 2 years. I'm seriously considering a school of music for my college and i'm curious as to where i stand on the food chain for these music schools ( i really dont know much about them.)

A couple drawbacks for me:
-about a B average gpa
-mediocre SAT scores
-can't read sheet music!!!
-pitch needs some working on


I would post recordings of myself but I don't have a camcorder so here are the only songs i currently have down flawlessly ( for the most part )

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_YEX...feature=related
Walter Lupi's arrangement of Bob Dylans AATW

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pGxW...feature=channel
Antoine Dufour's "Hiding Place for the Moon"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ddn4MGaS3N4
Andy Mckee's "Drifting"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tYQ7O6V0Fvk
Eric Roche's arrangement of Nirvana's "Smells Like Teen Spirit"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=23VFCY84C3s
Don Ross's "Elevation Music"

Please tell me if you guys think i have a shot based on what i've told you
#3
well the fact that you don't know how to read sheet doesn't help your chances, you start working on that. Also if you were in you school's orchestra or band that would help because it shows you have a background with music.
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#4
if your loaded with cash, have good jazz theory, your autidion piece is outstanding, and can read sheet music your chances are high. but im not sure what they will do about you not being able to read sheet music.
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#5
well all i can recomend is for the audition try for the love of good learn how to read sheet music lol
but from friends that i have who go there the best thing to play in the audtion would be a jazz piece
#6
Quote by Themann810
I'm going into my senior year now and i've been playing guitar for about 2 years. I'm seriously considering a school of music for my college and i'm curious as to where i stand on the food chain for these music schools ( i really dont know much about them.)

A couple drawbacks for me:

- i've been playing guitar for about 2 years

-can't read sheet music!!!



^ those are 2 serious drawbacks for going to music school

I would highly recommend that you get some more experience 1st, and definitely not only learn to read, but become proficient at it.


so where do you stand in the chain? ....

If you get in, your class mates will in most (if not all) cases be far more experienced.


sorry. I don't mean to discourage you. I think you just need to be more realistic.


Quote by Themann810

here are the only songs i currently have down flawlessly

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ddn4MGaS3N4
Andy Mckee's "Drifting"



being honest with yourself about what you can play flawlessly is important as well.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 16, 2009,
#7
Honestly, I will tell you that your chances depend mostly on work ethic. If you have the drive to learn what you need to by your audition date, I have a feeling that you can do this. It might take some natural talent on your part, as well as some private lessons, especially since you're leaving yourself less than a year to do this. A casual musician throughout high school usually has a better chance of making it into a good music program if they start really working hard at it during their junior year. Taking music theory, practicing aural skills, and learning proper instrumental technique are three of the more important things that colleges look for. I would also tell you to apply to a variety of schools including Berklee. Plus you don't want to contribute to the stereotype of collegiate musicians that Berklee is for not as talented musicians who just have a lot of money and can't stake it out at other music schools. If you're really serious about going into music, you'll apply to more than one school. It can't be the school that influences you, but what you'll learn and get out of it. You never know, different music schools can be a lot different from each other, and one school might suit you a lot better than you would ever know.
Last edited by JacKofAces91 at Aug 16, 2009,
#8
Regarding your chances, I would say they're pretty low, but certainly not impossible. However, I would strongly recommend that you apply to some schools not known for music. Find schools that appeal to you for other reasons than just the music program, and get in tight with the music teachers there. Almost all music teachers from any respectable college, whether music or not, are good teachers. Practice your ass off for the next year or two, then when you and your instructor feel you've reached a good level of musicianship, reapply as a sophomore or junior to a better music school. You will have learned a lot in the process and you can still say that you GRADUATED from the music school of your choice. Best of luck man, and if you need any other questions answered, just ask me and I'll try to give you the best answer I can.
#9
Quote by GuitarMunky
^ those are 2 serious drawbacks for going to music school

I would highly recommend that you get some more experience 1st, and definitely not only learn to read, but become proficient at it.


so where do you stand in the chain? ....

If you get in, your class mates will in most (if not all) cases be far more experienced.


sorry. I don't mean to discourage you. I think you just need to be more realistic.


being honest with yourself about what you can play flawlessly is important as well.



Drifting was the easiest of those songs to learn, just because it looks fancy doesn't make it difficult
#10
Quote by JacKofAces91
Honestly, I will tell you that your chances depend mostly on work ethic. If you have the drive to learn what you need to by your audition date, I have a feeling that you can do this. It might take some natural talent on your part, as well as some private lessons, especially since you're leaving yourself less than a year to do this. A casual musician throughout high school usually has a better chance of making it into a good music program if they start really working hard at it during their junior year. Taking music theory, practicing aural skills, and learning proper instrumental technique are three of the more important things that colleges look for. I would also tell you to apply to a variety of schools including Berklee. Plus you don't want to contribute to the stereotype of collegiate musicians that Berklee is for not as talented musicians who just have a lot of money and can't stake it out at other music schools. If you're really serious about going into music, you'll apply to more than one school. It can't be the school that influences you, but what you'll learn and get out of it. You never know, different music schools can be a lot different from each other, and one school might suit you a lot better than you would ever know.



thanks for that input, and yes i wouldn't only apply to berklee as that would be pretty dumb, i'm sure there are plenty of great music schools or schools with good music programs out there, i heard there was a pretty good one in hollywood CA
#11
Quote by Themann810
Drifting was the easiest of those songs to learn, just because it looks fancy doesn't make it difficult


No offense, but the idea that someone playing for only 2 years could play those flawlessly just isn't believable. I mean if you can, good for you, you're incredibly gifted if that's the case. I would suggest getting a teacher if your actually planning on going to a music school. They would be your best guide in getting prepared.
shred is gaudy music
#12
Quote by GuitarMunky
^ those are 2 serious drawbacks for going to music school

I would highly recommend that you get some more experience 1st, and definitely not only learn to read, but become proficient at it.


so where do you stand in the chain? ....

If you get in, your class mates will in most (if not all) cases be far more experienced.


sorry. I don't mean to discourage you. I think you just need to be more realistic.


being honest with yourself about what you can play flawlessly is important as well.


Great advice!
The one thing I would say - it's true that virtually all of your classmates will be considerably ahead of you. If you have an extremely strong work ethic, and I mean you are willing to seriously work your butt off, this can be an advantage in disguise, in that you will improve very quickly in trying to keep up with them.

Reading sheet music is a must. It is learnable in the time you have, but again you have to work very hard at it - you are trying to catch up to an average applicant that not only reads sheet music but has been doing it for several years.

I would do some serious soul searching. Confirm with yourself that you absolutely want this more than anything else in this world. Think about everything involved. The amount of work it will take. The fact that for most people being a professional musician is a difficult, low paying and uncertain occupation. The whole "American Dream" thing - a house with a yard, wife, kids, dog, etc, seems very far off when you are 17. Ten years from now, it will be a lot stronger. Absolutely talk with your parents as much as possible - due to the large amount of cash that will be dropped, they are your teammates in this thing.

If you are absolutely certain, go for it and work your tail off. If you have doubts, come up with a plan B such as finding a college where you can major in something that's a bit more of a financial sure-shot, but with a strong music program, so that you can minor in music. Taking courses for your minor keeps the door open for plan A, and you can continue evaluating as time passes.

Whatever your decision, best of luck!
#13
Quote by Themann810
Drifting was the easiest of those songs to learn, just because it looks fancy doesn't make it difficult

Then why didn't you post a video of you playing it?
Actually called Mark!

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#14
He probably palm muted instead of using the acoustic the way it is in the video?
#15
they'd prefer that you're half decent, but can read music. my teacher went to the finest music school in cuba so he knows how that **** works. reading music isn't that hard. i've been reading for about 5 months now and i can get it pretty fast, but you have to practice everyday with new piece of music to not get accustomed to the same notes.
#16
learn to read and use this website--good-ear.com--or a similar one to develop your ear. prepare a jaw-dropping audition piece and brush up on theory, berklee is neither terribly hard or terribly easy to get into you just have to be good.
#18
Quote by steven seagull
Then why didn't you post a video of you playing it?



refer to my previous comment of not having a camcorder
#19
Quote by tehREALcaptain
learn to read and use this website--good-ear.com--or a similar one to develop your ear. prepare a jaw-dropping audition piece and brush up on theory, berklee is neither terribly hard or terribly easy to get into you just have to be good.


You go to Berklee?
shred is gaudy music
#20
Quote by Fred Durst
Are your parents rich? If not, don't go to Berklee. Pretty sure tuition there is like 20k+ per year, so you are gonna rack up a huge bill and getting into a big debt for a music degree is Extremely Stupid.
I thought it was more around 30k last time I looked but 20 is about the same as most universities.
#21
guitarmunky,
i dont go to berklee. i was accepted though, however with 0 financial aid and housing at berklee and a scholarship at a university (loyola new orleans) i decided against it. its about as expensive as any other private college, music conservatory or otherwise. it is however considerably larger then most music schools (a guitar studio of at least 1,500 as opposed to the 10-20 at a good university or conservatory) and while it has some great faculty and a strong program its easy to get lost in the crowd and receive a sub-standard musical education. however, if your incredibly motivated and decently talented you can receive an excelent education and network extremely well.
#22
I was planning on going to Berklee until I realized

1. It'd be extremely costly
2. The diploma would do basically nothing for me
3. There's cheaper music colleges

Although I would suggest learning to read sheet music first, at LEAST for guitar. I'm guessing they'd like you to be able to read all clefs no matter what instrument.

Experience is a huge factor also.

Grades mean basically nothing at Berklee, or so I've been told by my guitar teacher that went there and a couple people I know who are currently attending
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#23
So im assuming you just play steel string acoustic? You need to demonstrate versitility in your audition, i dont know what the situation is at berklee but where i auditioned you got 7 minutes and could do 3 pieces of contrasting styles so i did Asturias a Pat Metheny tune and an original composition.

If i were you, i would completely stop reading tab memorise the notes over the whole fretboard, have great knowledge of the intervals you are playing, drop the whole 'slappy' acoustic guitar thing because it just wont cut it, prepare maybe a django reinheart piece because 2 things i know they love at berkee are ethnic music and jazz. You need to know at least the information in the Music theory the beginning article on here and you need to be able to recognise chord types scales and definately be able to sing intervals because this is a big thing in music degrees.

This stuff isnt just about getting in, its about not getting totally owned when you get there and falling behind. Its all pretty basic stuff to be honest. I did not get in to my music degree because there was a huge demand for places and i had most of the stuff listed. In hindsight it wasnt that big a deal because i do music now anyway and all the stuff in that expensive course is available via the internet (apart from the famous musicians who come in but you can always do webcam lessons with someone like greg howe).
Last edited by Serg1 at Aug 17, 2009,