#1
Hello! First off, I'm new here and just want to say that so far everyone has been great! Definately one of the most mature forums I've seen!
Anyways, I was wondering what scales or theory I should learn to be better at improvising. I don't just mean over a chord progression though, I also mean just throwing together some notes... like instrumental style! So, if anyone has a good idea for a starting point to get into that kinda stuff!

Any help s apreciated!
#2
Hello! First off, I'm new here and just want to say that so far everyone has been great! Definately one of the most mature forums I've seen!

Also, cocks.

Anyways, I was wondering what scales or theory I should learn to be better at improvising. I don't just mean over a chord progression though, I also mean just throwing together some notes... like instrumental style! So, if anyone has a good idea for a starting point to get into that kinda stuff!

I would recommend the Minor Pentatonic. It's very easy to sound good with it quickly (although takes years to master).
Call me Batman.
#3
Quote by fngrstylgtr
Hello! First off, I'm new here and just want to say that so far everyone has been great! Definately one of the most mature forums I've seen!



BAHAHAHA! The most mature forum? Wow. Have you been to the pit yet?

Learn many scales, practice, and apply.
Quote by Demonikk
+1 on everything phip said

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#4
Quote by fngrstylgtr
Hello! First off, I'm new here and just want to say that so far everyone has been great! Definately one of the most mature forums I've seen!


Stick around, you haven't seen anything yet.


Quote by fngrstylgtr

Anyways, I was wondering what scales or theory I should learn to be better at improvising. I don't just mean over a chord progression though, I also mean just throwing together some notes... like instrumental style! So, if anyone has a good idea for a starting point to get into that kinda stuff!

Any help s apreciated!


commonly used scales ..

Major
minor
Major pentatonic
minor pentatonic
Major blues
minor blues


Theory.... as much as you can. Start with the Major scale though, and spend some quality time there.

If you want a detailed program to go through, you might try a teacher and/or a class.

In general though, to get better at improvising, you need to get better at music. Listen, learn, practice, play, enjoy. It takes time.
shred is gaudy music
#5
Wow, thanks guys! And, when I said this forum is mature... I specifically meant Music Talk! A lot of people in the Acoustic Guitar, Electric Guitar, Pit, are tools.... and even a few people that frequent the Technique section! So I try and surf mostly in MT

Anyways, I was googling scales and found this site!
http://www.chordbook.com/guitarscales.php
It seems really good!

What I've done so far:
Memorized Major, Minor, PentM, Pentm, and Blues scales starting on E,a

So, with that said... should I just exercise those scales until I can do them while sleeping... or move on to positions on the d and g string?
#6
Quote by fngrstylgtr
So, with that said... should I just exercise those scales until I can do them while sleeping... or move on to positions on the d and g string?

Don't just learn patterns. Learn the intervals and the notes in every key, and learn all the notes on the fretboard.
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- John Coltrane
#7
do what i do ! make up some badass rhythm and then improvise over it ...but know what key your in check my songs out ... good luck
"Their always is no such thing as a wrong note!"
#8
Quote by 7even
Don't just learn patterns. Learn the intervals and the notes in every key, and learn all the notes on the fretboard.

^this
#10
Quote by fngrstylgtr
Wow, thanks guys! And, when I said this forum is mature... I specifically meant Music Talk! A lot of people in the Acoustic Guitar, Electric Guitar, Pit, are tools.... and even a few people that frequent the Technique section! So I try and surf mostly in MT

Anyways, I was googling scales and found this site!
http://www.chordbook.com/guitarscales.php
It seems really good!

What I've done so far:
Memorized Major, Minor, PentM, Pentm, and Blues scales starting on E,a

So, with that said... should I just exercise those scales until I can do them while sleeping... or move on to positions on the d and g string?


Well, now that you've exposed yourself to some patterns, I would suggest spending some quality time making music with them, and studying them.... ... truly get to know them.


The studying thing will take a while. Start at the beginning with the Major scale, and work your way through from there. I would get a theory book so that you have an organized approach to learning the material

regarding playing and making music with them..... find some solo's you like....... Learn, and play them. Do alot of this.

I wouldn't bother learning any new scales patterns until you can

1) make some music
2) understand them.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 16, 2009,
#11
"Don't just learn patterns. Learn the intervals and the notes in every key, and learn all the notes on the fretboard."

Well, I didn't JUST learn the patterns! I'm practicing the patterns, to develope speed and precision! I can still play any of the scales I know on either: one, two, three, four, five or six strings! I understand the intervals, and how to move any scale around the fretboard... but I'm just practicing specific positions for the sake of greater skill! Thanks for your concern though!
#12
Quote by fngrstylgtr
Wow, thanks guys! And, when I said this forum is mature... I specifically meant Music Talk! A lot of people in the Acoustic Guitar, Electric Guitar, Pit, are tools.... and even a few people that frequent the Technique section! So I try and surf mostly in MT

Anyways, I was googling scales and found this site!
http://www.chordbook.com/guitarscales.php
It seems really good!

What I've done so far:
Memorized Major, Minor, PentM, Pentm, and Blues scales starting on E,a

So, with that said... should I just exercise those scales until I can do them while sleeping... or move on to positions on the d and g string?
MT is where it's at

Work on all different positions. In my opinion you'll want a knowledge of as many as you can but you don't want to beat them into your brain. I did that and my solos really suck because I play the same thing over and over. I can't get out of pentatonic mode.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#13
What I do to practice this is put my ipod on shuffle so random songs play. Then I find the root note and work out what scale(s) would work over it. Then I just improv through the song and try to move my scales around the neck.
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Who's going to stop you? The music police?
#14
here's an idea, why not spend more time practicing and less time wanking off to guitar forums

just a thought
Originally Posted by jmac72187
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#15
Quote by GuitarMunky
Well, now that you've exposed yourself to some patterns, I would suggest spending some quality time making music with them, and studying them.... ... truly get to know them.


The studying thing will take a while. Start at the beginning with the Major scale, and work your way through from there. I would get a theory book so that you have an organized approach to learning the material

regarding playing and making music with them..... find some solo's you like....... Learn, and play them. Do alot of this.

I wouldn't bother learning any new scales patterns until you can

1) make some music
2) understand them.


This is the kind of post you have to pay attention to.

Although it is unfortunate, I must admit that a large number of musicians (particularly guitarists and bassists and drummers) find theory a bore. If this is the case just keep playing. Practice playing the patterns of the scales you have learned. Play along with some of your favourite songs to help get your fingers used to moving in different ways - you may begin to recognize some patterns while playing solos by your favourite bands!

Eventually you will become interested in the reasons why a scale sounds the way it does and how to "properly" apply it to playing music. I feel that it is very important to understand this, but don't force it on yourself if you aren't interested in the theory behind the scales etc.

Also, learning the notes on the fretboard is very useful. Very useful.
#16
warned for flaming ^^

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#17
"Eventually you will become interested in the reasons why a scale sounds the way it does and how to "properly" apply it to playing music."

I've study music theory... so that's not an issue! I'm just wondering what type of other, less heard, usefull tips there might be to help with my improvising! I'm working on scales daily, and applying theory every time I play