#1
Hey.

I've been told many-a-time that slow, wide vibrato is the way to (like zakk wylde), but i've always been more into the vibrato of Marty Friedman and Steve Vai, which if i'm correct is fairly narrow?


Also when I do vibrato I rely on a rapid motion of my wrist and I pretty much always vibrate the string up as opposed to down, is this the way to do things?

Thanks.
#2
It's all personal preference. If you like the way your vibrato sounds, stick with it.
#3
i think it depends entirely on what your going for. different situations call for different vibrato from light to over the top, it depends on the song and context.
really your just looking to be in control of it.
#4
I rotate my wrist, the way blues guys do it. Gives me a wider vibrato.

Vai, Freidman, and other classically-trained players will user a narrower up-down vibrato, as that is the 'correct' way to do it on a classical guitar, and it just sort of carries over.
#5
As long as it's accurate pitch wise, it's a matter of personal taste and musical context.
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#6
Quote by jean_genie
I rotate my wrist, the way blues guys do it. Gives me a wider vibrato.

Vai, Freidman, and other classically-trained players will user a narrower up-down vibrato, as that is the 'correct' way to do it on a classical guitar, and it just sort of carries over.


Does ''up, down'' mean you have to go ''up'' and then ''down'' with it, because I usually just go up then return it back to the original pitch, then up again.
#7
jmag said: As long as it's accurate pitch wise, it's a matter of personal taste and musical context.


you're thinking of tremolo. vibrato is the changing of pitch, while tremolo is volume changing.
otherwise, just go with what sounds good.
#8
I recommend that you be able to do both. There are instances when a slow, wide vibrato best suits the context, and there are instance where a faster, narrow vibrato best suits the context. Often it can be very nice to start narrow and widen the vibrato, or indeed to start wide and become narrower. I see no reason why you should limit your phrasing.
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