#1
Heres my question

if i play a d minor 6 in this shape

10
-
9
10
10
-

and i am playing in the key of c major/a minor

if i want to apply this chord shape to a minor
i get this:

5
-
4
5
5
-

the thing is that there is an F sharp here that doesnt fit the c major scale.
if i count from a and play the sixth note i would have to add an f to the a minor chord.
but if i do that i get an f major 7 chord (f a c e) so how do i actually play an a minor 6 that fits the key of c major? and what notes does it consist of?
#2
Your tabs are upside down. Other than that, you are correct.

A 6 chord is gonna have a major 6th, no matter whether it's a maj6 or a m6, so if it's a m6 played as the tonic, it's gonna have an accidental.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#3
an Am6 doesnt fit into the key of C major, as you said you would need to flatten the 6th, which would make it an Am b6 chord.

the notes of this chord are A-C-E-F

many chords have the same notes and are called different things, its all about how the chord is related to everything else going on.
#5
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Fmaj7/A is usually a better name for that chord.


i know, but as i said, its all about what you want from the chord.

if you imagine it as an Am chord in your progression, thats what it is.