#1
Heatgunned a maple laminate top of my epi lp standard. I was kinda scared when I did it, and I thought I had done enough research. I scanned forums and yt and stuff asking questions and reading up on heatgunning but mistakes happen I guess. This is an old guitar which had been replaced, so I'm not really annoyed, but I an pissed that I don't think I can get away with what I wanted. Anyway, her is the damage:



Here are a couple of other pics just for good measure:



What happened was, I tried to heatgun the top of the guitar, after succesfully doing the back, and it started to bubble up. I didn't think about it being a laminate veneer and about the glue which is holding it all together. So I am now left with the cracks, situated above. I wanted a all natural finish, but I'm guessing I'll never get away with it. What are my options, ug?
Quote by WtrPlyr
Quote by alans056
Maybe the price tag is clouding your judgment ?
yeah probably. Or the circuits.
#3
I'd leave it like that!
totally badass in my opinion. I would do the same to the entire top to try to give it that smokey maple you can see in the back of it
#4
Quote by conroy91
I'd leave it like that!
totally badass in my opinion. I would do the same to the entire top to try to give it that smokey maple you can see in the back of it


Haha thanks, but I'm going for more of a nice classic look, stick some telecaster knobs on, if I can afford it, I might put a bucker sized p90 in the neck or bridge.

Quote by Ippon
Continue removing the veneer and apply a new Maple veneer that you can refinish with your color choice?

I understand that veneers are pretty inexpensive. Good Luck!



I would do this, but I have no idea how to even start putting a veneer on such a heavily contoured guitar. thanks

Anyone know how easy and expenisive it is to do?
Quote by WtrPlyr
Quote by alans056
Maybe the price tag is clouding your judgment ?
yeah probably. Or the circuits.
#5
i imagine its not a veneer issue its a top.. you'll have to re-top it, or have it done by a local (qualified) luthier/shop. veneers are usually rather thin, where as this is going to be a thicker top piece..
#6
Ugh, Will this cost me alot of money do you think?
Quote by WtrPlyr
Quote by alans056
Maybe the price tag is clouding your judgment ?
yeah probably. Or the circuits.
#7
Quote by POWERMETAL!
i imagine its not a veneer issue its a top.. you'll have to re-top it, or have it done by a local (qualified) luthier/shop. veneers are usually rather thin, where as this is going to be a thicker top piece..

He's not going to melt off a cap with a heat gun. It's definitely a veneer issue, if at all. I don't know why nor can I think of a reason Epiphone would put a veneer on a solid finish top. Continue to strip the finish with your heat gun (CAREFULLY though since you want a natural finish - do NOT scorch the wood). The wood on top will be whatever Epi uses as a cap to the mahogany body. It won't be the prettiest and will likely be a 3-4 piece body, but it's still manageable.

Don't freak out, you're doing fine. Worst comes to worst, you refinish it with a solid color. What does the wood look like right now? can you tell if there's a veneer?
Hi!

Sig Retired.
#8
Oh wait, I didn't look at the pictures closely enough. Do you have a better camera to take some photos with that are clearer? I can't make out what's going on here. Is that a hole in the wood?

The paint is supposed to 'bubble' and crackle off when using a heat gun . . . Either better photos or a better explanation will help me understand your situation more.
Hi!

Sig Retired.
#9
If I were you I would just go for the good old sand paper/ elbow grease method. Very little can go wrong with it. In the first picture is that a hole in the guitar? This seems very strange.
Epi Les Paul Standard
Vox AD50VT
#12
That's just the epoxy they use in their finishes on low end models cracking and breaking up. Nasty ****, make extra sure you're using a cannister-filtered mask when heating that **** off.
Quote by AcousticMirror
Is my album list pointing a gun or a penis to your head saying buddy this thing is going to unload if you don't listen to the whole damn clip??
#13
K, here are some better quality photos, I hope.






The crack situated near the side of the guitar is significantly thicker than the other one. It's probably about 0.75mm thick (estimate), and the other one near the bottom of the guitar is alot thinner, more paper like in texture. Please help. I was thinking, (this is a weird idea) of maybe ripping the parts more to make a couple strips across the guitar, then painting those a semi translucent brownish kind of colour, and keeping the rest natural, then lacquering it so it kind of looks kinda like this:



Edit: I haven't got the heatgun for a while now, it's at school, and I'm on summer holiday. I did the damage a while back and decided to just sand a bit more of the stuff I could do, and come back to it later.
Quote by WtrPlyr
Quote by alans056
Maybe the price tag is clouding your judgment ?
yeah probably. Or the circuits.
Last edited by PussyPunk182 at Aug 17, 2009,
#14
Quote by la bamba
Oh wait, I didn't look at the pictures closely enough. Do you have a better camera to take some photos with that are clearer? I can't make out what's going on here. Is that a hole in the wood?

The paint is supposed to 'bubble' and crackle off when using a heat gun . . . Either better photos or a better explanation will help me understand your situation more.


Yeah, sorry, the cracks kind of pealed off some how and made holes, not all the way into the mahogany obviously, but they're not just like linear cracks.
Quote by WtrPlyr
Quote by alans056
Maybe the price tag is clouding your judgment ?
yeah probably. Or the circuits.
#15
Leave it bare!! I flicked through the pics first and thought 'Whooo! Some bad-ass modding going on here! Just stick some lacquer on it!

Time on earth is like butterscotch; you really want more, even though it will probably just make you ill.



Certified lurker
#16
So the crack is definitely in the wood? Not just the paint?

Tell me more about how it happened. Did you accidentally strip the wood off while stripping the paint? Did the wood 'melt' off?
Hi!

Sig Retired.
#17
Yep, definatley not the paint.

Well, from what I can remember, we (me and my friend) began gunning the top, and the paint started to melt slightly, and then the sufrace started to wave. We were confused at first and just thought we might aswell have another go at it somewhere else, just to check if it was a dodgy spot in the wood, so we started on another bit, and it started to bubble slightly again, but my friend said to keep going, it might just be a thicker layer of paint reacting differently, so we did, and then as I started to flick away the patches we had worked on it broke the wood I think.

The wood definatley did not melt off, I believe the heatgun kinda weakened it and seperated the veneer from the cap, and when I tried to flick away the paint, the paint was actually still on the wood and it split.

Although this was quite a while ago, (around January/February I think, but not completley sure.) so it could have been slightly different, but that's the main jist.

What do you think about my above idea? making a kind of weird feature out of it?

Also, sanding it by hand is becoming really frustrating, as I've been out there for atleast 4/5 hours in total and haven't even got a quater of the top done. Would a power sander be too easy to screw up the contour? I think its too aggresive for such a curved wood, but am thinking of trying it.
Quote by WtrPlyr
Quote by alans056
Maybe the price tag is clouding your judgment ?
yeah probably. Or the circuits.
Last edited by PussyPunk182 at Aug 17, 2009,
#18
You could at least sand the back with a power sander. Also, is the guitar made of solid wood, or plywood? It might be that it is ply, and the heat caused it to separate.
#19
Sounds and looks like the veneer, but I hesitate to say that with 100% confidence because I still do not understand why there would be a veneer on a solid color top. Email Epiphone and ask them if they top solid color LPs with veneers . . . that should give you a clearer picture.

As for the mock up, I'm not big on stripes but if it works for you, then by all means go for it.

If you want to leave it all natural, you could veneer your guitar again. I have not done this before, but I am sure there are plenty of good tutorials out there that can help you.

As for now, just continue (carefully!!!) with the heat gun so you don't scorch the wood. IMO, just get rid of the veneer altogether. Veneers are usually about 1/32'' thick and won't make any substantial difference to your guitar.
Hi!

Sig Retired.
#20
Ok well thanks, I am pretty sure it is a veneer because I can see the maple like grain on the top, and underneath where the cracks are, from what I can see, it's alot different.

Also, like I said before the heatgun is at school and I'm on summer break so it's not available, I guess I'll just keep sanding away.

Quote by cedricsmods
You could at least sand the back with a power sander. Also, is the guitar made of solid wood, or plywood? It might be that it is ply, and the heat caused it to separate.


Yeah, I was thinking that. It's made of mahogany.

Does anyone know where I can get a veneer cheap? and also, a tut that will show me how to do it on a les paul style guitar? I have seen the tuts on guitars like Ibby RGs and stuff, but not on a les paul style, and the tops are completley different.
Quote by WtrPlyr
Quote by alans056
Maybe the price tag is clouding your judgment ?
yeah probably. Or the circuits.
#21
Again - having stripped a few of these - they put a THICK coat of epoxy finish on, that is most likely what you are bubbling and cracking.
Quote by AcousticMirror
Is my album list pointing a gun or a penis to your head saying buddy this thing is going to unload if you don't listen to the whole damn clip??
#22
W0lf is probably right. I just did some repair work on an Epi that have about 1/8 thick epoxy on top of plywood. Now there's tonewood for you!
#23
Quote by cedricsmods
W0lf is probably right. I just did some repair work on an Epi that have about 1/8 thick epoxy on top of plywood. Now there's tonewood for you!


What model was this on? I hope it wasn't anything above a studio...

And what grit of sand paper are you using to sand the paint off? I started with 50 and when I got to where the wood was about to show i switched to around 120. You just have to be careful with the 50 grit as it will rip through wood like toilet paper.
Epi Les Paul Standard
Vox AD50VT
Last edited by AgresiveNapkins at Aug 21, 2009,