#1
I am currently using amplitube and want to do some recording, I would like to know what is a good setting for buffer size and sample rate so I can get a low latency. I am using a "low latency" behringer ucg usb guitar link with a buffer of 512 and sample rate of 48 khz. According to this I should have a latency of 10.6 milisecond (buffer/sample rate= latency) Funny thing most recordings I've listened to are with a buffer of 256 and sample of 44.1 khz. how much quality is a buffer 512 vs 256 and 1024? I cannot really tell them apart, but I'm not sure... what is the rule of thumb for this?
#2
record the guitar as a clean DI, then apply ampltube, then you won't need to worry about that.
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#3
If I were to do that what would be some norm as far as buffer/sample rate/ acceptable latency is concerned? BTW the buffer size does not influence the quality of the sound does it? I alwasy thought it was the sample rate that determined the sound quality...
Last edited by LedZepFan2000 at Aug 16, 2009,
#4
Sample rate and bit depth are the main quality factors.
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#5
having your buffer size too low can cause glitching and dropouts though.
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#6
It depends on your setup, and anyway "acceptable" is very subjective. Usually you just keep decreasing the latency until you hear the PC glitching, then you bring it up a bit. If you record first then latency isn't an issue.
Quote by Tombe
With pedals you can throw your guitar down for an impromptu pedal drone solo, whereas if you did that on a rack it would just look like you were programming your washing machine.
#7
ok well I have my setting like this: 32-bit with sample rate at 48 khz and buffer of 512. If I increase the buffer to 1024 the quality does not get any better, at least I can't tell the difference and there is a tiny tiny amount of lag . I have also set the buffer to 64, but it cracks and pops.
#8
Drop the bitrate to 24 or even 16 bit. Increasing the buffer will not increase the quality - gradually lower it in multiples of 100 until you start hearing glitches as I said, then raise it a bit.
Quote by Tombe
With pedals you can throw your guitar down for an impromptu pedal drone solo, whereas if you did that on a rack it would just look like you were programming your washing machine.
#9
ok I did that, but to my ears it sounds the same as before, there is no aparrent lag anymore, at least to my ears, perhaps ardour might tell me my latency in ms... I say the quality is much better now
#10
32 bit audio?!

What the hell is your rig?
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#11
Quote by willieturnip
32 bit audio?!

What the hell is your rig?

A lot of DAWs default to 32-bit, that doesn't mean the recordings themselves are 32-bit...

"Quality" isn't linked to the buffer (it is linked to the bitrate and sample rate) which is why you're meant to keep it as low as possible.
Quote by Tombe
With pedals you can throw your guitar down for an impromptu pedal drone solo, whereas if you did that on a rack it would just look like you were programming your washing machine.
#12
"Quality" isn't linked to the buffer (it is linked to the bitrate and sample rate) which is why you're meant to keep it as low as possible.

Interesting... I always thought it was the buffer size that dictated the quality of it. So I guess just crank up the sample rate and bitrate and lower the buffer as much as possible without artifacts, since a 64 buffer won't sound different than a 1024 buffer
#13
Quote by LedZepFan2000
Interesting... I always thought it was the buffer size that dictated the quality of it. So I guess just crank up the sample rate and bitrate and lower the buffer as much as possible without artifacts, since a 64 buffer won't sound different than a 1024 buffer

Exactly. Remember that CD-quality is 16-bit 44.1kHz, and alot of home studios run at 24-bit 48kHz (98kHz is a waste of space...)
Quote by Tombe
With pedals you can throw your guitar down for an impromptu pedal drone solo, whereas if you did that on a rack it would just look like you were programming your washing machine.