#1
hey i've been playing for five years and i feel like a complete noob. im self taught but i've always found it difficult to learn by ear. can anyone give me some tips?
#2
Just play what you feel, I know it seems kind of cheesy, but if you put on some music that you like, keep it low and crank the amp up and play what you hear and feel. Maybe add in some of your own flavor and viola!
Gear:
-Gibson Les Paul Studio Cherry Sunburst w/ Alnico Pro II
-1960 Yamaha Orange Sticker Acoustic
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-Blackstar HT-5RH
#3
Start with easy stuff to figure out. Slow and only one guitar. If you learn by ear for a certain band, learn just one song with a tab because usually a band will use around the same chords for all the songs or remain in the same key or something. All you can really do to learn it is simply practice it. You can use some programs to remove vocals and slow down time so it's easier to pick up, that's what I do. But other than that I can't really offer anything. Sorry
#4
ok thanks well ok i have another question. how can i tell what tunning A song is in any clues?
#5
This took me a long time. I started out and still am somewhat tone deaf. If you can't tune a guitar by ear, then you'll struggle learning a song this way.

Start getting the feel for matching pitches with your guitar, in your head, and your voice.

Next, play the song and only work at a chord at a time (if you're not good at this like me, you'll have to go slow). Often but not always, the first chord is a major or minor chord and is the key of the song. Don't rely on this though. The best way to do this is to "feel" for it. For example, a song I just learned always started and ended musical phrases on the root of E. Since the root is the tonal center of a song, it'll always feel like "home" when you play it over that song. Often the key note of a song will continue to play while other notes seem to dance around it. So you'll keep hearing that almost droning sound of the chord/note persist over the melody.

Go up one string of your guitar and playing only one note, see which one is enharmonic with the chord in the song. If you're matching a chord, you might accidentally settle on the third of that chord, but try to distinguish that from the root. Once you get the basic chord progressions down with single notes, try expanding them to their full chords. This shouldn't be too difficult. For example, if you hear a song starts on an E chord of some kind, you may assume (if you don't yet have an ear for major/minor) its major, and play an Emajor on top of it. If it sounds terrible, it may be because the chord in a song is an E minor and the major/minor thirds are clashing, thus trying a E minor might sound perfect. If it still sounds wrong, then maybe you got the root note wrong for that chord. As your ear develops, you'll be able to notice subtle changes in chords as well (maj->sus4->sus2, etc), 7th chords, and so on. Lastly, if all of a sudden everything sounds wrong and you get lost, a key change may have occured, I'm not so good when this happens

As you do this through the song, you'll start to notice the notes will fit into one and only one key, this is usually enough to get you started. Secondly, I often "cheat" and find live performances of the song on youtube and try to see the guitarist's hand positions on the guitar. This is how I also discover certain songs are played with a capo (not so easy to determine by ear).

Other good ears on this forum will laugh at my techniques, but this is how I do it.
this is a post. there are many like it but this one is mine

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Taylor Big Baby
Agile 3100 CSB
Peavey classic 30/112
Okko Dominator, Big muff pi, cs3, dd3, ch1, ts9, ad9, classic wah
Last edited by mlfarrell at Aug 17, 2009,
#6
If you know your theory, play around and figure out some notes, then try to complete a scale and figure out the root. Once you know that it will make figuring out the rest of the song much easier, especially if it is played in only one key.
#7
ok thanks. i'll try this out. well now that the matter at hand is covered i guess the thread is done
#8
I don't know if this will help but there's only 12 notes on the guitar.
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Vox VT40+
#11
Definitely gonna take some time but I've heard that there are some computer software programs that are designed to test, train, and develop your ear. One of them is called Earmaster, I've read some good reviews about it.
#12
Quote by eyeplayguitar
Definitely gonna take some time but I've heard that there are some computer software programs that are designed to test, train, and develop your ear. One of them is called Earmaster, I've read some good reviews about it.


GNU solfege is good for this.
this is a post. there are many like it but this one is mine

=======================

Taylor Big Baby
Agile 3100 CSB
Peavey classic 30/112
Okko Dominator, Big muff pi, cs3, dd3, ch1, ts9, ad9, classic wah
#13
Yeah i had this problem at first, but i just learned some theory and it came pretty easy, i started off learning to recognize "intervals" (isnt' that the name?) between 2 notes and it became much much easier. After that if u recognize which key its in it gets really easy
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- Behringer V-Amp Multi-effects
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#14
Quote by OldRocker
I don't know if this will help but there's only 12 notes on the guitar.

There's only 12 notes in Western Music.
New To Town With A Made Up Name

In The Angel's City

Chasing Fortune And Fame
09/03/2012
#15
Quote by angel6746
hey i've been playing for five years and i feel like a complete noob. im self taught but i've always found it difficult to learn by ear. can anyone give me some tips?


try and play satisfaction by the rolling stones and day tripper by the beatles by ear.