#1
What's next? Besides sitting here practicing them over and over, where do I go from here? Is there something I should be learning other than the notes/patterns of the modes in each key? Or is this basically all I need to know?
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#2
Need to know for what?

Modes in a modal context (vamps) all have a unique sound/vibe to them).

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#3
How do I know which mode goes with which tone?
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#4
Quote by bambamm89
What's next? Besides sitting here practicing them over and over, where do I go from here? Is there something I should be learning other than the notes/patterns of the modes in each key? Or is this basically all I need to know?

no, i think you have pretty much done with them now!

perhaps focus on melody/harmony and write some songs in major and minor keys.
#6
I didn't just learn the patterns, I learned them on each string, each note in the scale, the scale on all 6 strings (box scale I guess it'd be called). My question is now, how do I use them without sounding like I'm just playing scales I guess? How do I know which mode I should be in, what key I should be in? All of these are questions really. I mean sometimes I just pick stuff up and play, am I to assume the first note I play is the key I'm in, and then see what notes I'm playing and see which scale matches it best?
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ate a girl out on her period...

i regret nothing.


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#7
Then you just learned them as patterns....so you've just learned the major scale 7 times over.

Shapes/patterns/where you play them are the least important aspect of modes to the point of being irrelevant. Why? Because they're exactly the same as the shapes of the major scale.

What's important is knowing which major scale they relate to, what signature intervals the mode posesses and how music needs to be constructed for modes to apply.
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#9
Quote by bambamm89
I didn't just learn the patterns, I learned them on each string, each note in the scale, the scale on all 6 strings (box scale I guess it'd be called). My question is now, how do I use them without sounding like I'm just playing scales I guess? How do I know which mode I should be in, what key I should be in? All of these are questions really. I mean sometimes I just pick stuff up and play, am I to assume the first note I play is the key I'm in, and then see what notes I'm playing and see which scale matches it best?



1 you play licks and lines based on the scale/mode patterns

2 it depends on what you are playing. for example if you are playing blues you wont be using phrygian and vice versa.

3 if you dont know how modes work in key you havent understood the main concept of them.

As in the other thread, it seems as if a lot of younger guitarists think MUST LEARN MODES, when they have little idea and experience of basic major and minors, how they work with chords and how you modulate etc. if i were you i would concentrate on getting a solid foundation of major and minors in terms of knowing the notes when you play, knowing the chords in the key, knowing what notes to play over certain chords, having an extensive lick library in your repetoire and covering various genres.

This covers 90% of the music you will play.
#10
Quote by steven seagull
Then you just learned them as patterns....so you've just learned the major scale 7 times over.

Shapes/patterns/where you play them are the least important aspect of modes to the point of being irrelevant. Why? Because they're exactly the same as the shapes of the major scale.

What's important is knowing which major scale they relate to, what signature intervals the mode posesses and how music needs to be constructed for modes to apply.



I wanted to say this, but I got banned for 20 minutes.

TS he's right.

"Patterns" means learning to play the notes on an instrument (in this case guitar).

"knowing" them means, you know what chords go with them, know the intervals in relation to the major scale, and as an extra addition, know why modal playing is looked upon as "useless in modern day" by the more established musicians/theorists.

My personal view is that you can analyse a piece of music within a song using modal terminology, but only if well built, cause the way music has gone, it has become very ambiguous.

By this I mean, that you should use em as communicative only within the context of using them as for example as scales like in jazz (discussions).

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#11
This helped a lot and was basically what I was asking for. I knew that knowing the patterns of each of the modes seemed way too simple, and it didn't feel like I really understood much.
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ate a girl out on her period...

i regret nothing.


I know how to shred paper, does that count?