#1
Hey guys, I've ventured into the realm of song writing and I have some queries which I'm sure some of you more experienced gentlemen can answer. Please excuse my noobiness/inexperience. Let me try and explain:

Lets say the following is the rhythm part of a song being played by the rhythm guitarist and also the bassist (obviously relative to a bass):

|--------|--------|--------|
|--x12--|--x4--|--x12--|
|--------|--------|--------|
|--4-----|---10--|---8----|
|--4-----|---10--|---8----|
|--2-----|----8--|----6---|

Now here is the theoretical part or so to speak. Say the lead part is to be playing some sort of riff/melody or what-not to accompany the song, where would this be played? I guess I'm asking what key? What scales would be used for it to be harmonious?

So using the above example, the rhythm is compromised by F#, C & A# power-chords. So what key am I playing melody in?! F#? C? A#?

Thanx heaps ya'll!

K.
Chitarre:
Epiphone Les Paul Custom (Ebony)
1969 Fender Competition Mustang Bass (Competition Red)
Amplificatore:
Orange Thunderverb 50 head
Orange PPC412

Effetti:
Fulltone OCD V 1.4
EHX Big Muff PI
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#2
I think that you could use a F# Blues minor scale.
Even God has a Hell, his love for Humanity.
by Friedrich Nietzsche

Call me Edge
#3
f# blues wouldnt work cuz C isnt in F# minor. i cant find a single scale that uses those three chords. simply put, kinda, u have f#, which means u have c# in that chord. however, your using a C natural as opposed to sharp in the chord progression. thus, your chords fit no scale, at least that i know of.

edit: i just played it, and im sorry, but it sounded bad. but i know, u said you were knew at this.
In speed versus emotional playing, i think of an M16 versus an M24. You can have 650 rounds per minute, or one round, one kill. Both should be in your arsenal.

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Last edited by ajreciever14 at Aug 17, 2009,
#4
Quote by ajreciever14
f# blues wouldnt work cuz C isnt in F# minor. i cant find a single scale that uses those three chords. simply put, kinda, u have f#, which means u have c# in that chord. however, your using a C natural as opposed to sharp in the chord progression. thus, your chords fit no scale, at least that i know of.

edit: i just played it, and im sorry, but it sounded bad. but i know, u said you were knew at this.


F# minor consists of F#, A, B, C, C#, E as it is F# minor pentatonic with added b5

Correct me if I'm wrong

EDIT: I meant F# minor blues consists of F#, A, B, C, Db, E
Last edited by Myshadow46_2 at Aug 17, 2009,
#5
Quote by Myshadow46_2
F# minor consists of F#, A, B, C, C#, E as it is F# minor pentatonic with added b5

Correct me if I'm wrong

its F#, G#, A, B, C#, D, E for the full scale. pentatonic just remove the half steps (G#, C#)

edit: if u wanna get really technical in theory, its i, ii, III, iv, V, VI, VII for minor, I, ii, iii, IV, V, vi, vii for major, caps being major chords and lower minor chords. however minor and major chords are irrelevant when using power chords.
In speed versus emotional playing, i think of an M16 versus an M24. You can have 650 rounds per minute, or one round, one kill. Both should be in your arsenal.

PSN and XBL: xxWONDERxxBOYxx
Leave a message that you're from UG with your username
Last edited by ajreciever14 at Aug 17, 2009,
#6
0_o You guys are SMMARRRRRTTTT
Chitarre:
Epiphone Les Paul Custom (Ebony)
1969 Fender Competition Mustang Bass (Competition Red)
Amplificatore:
Orange Thunderverb 50 head
Orange PPC412

Effetti:
Fulltone OCD V 1.4
EHX Big Muff PI
EHX Small Clone
Boss TU-3
#7
Quote by asr_larocca
0_o You guys are SMMARRRRRTTTT

well, myshadow isnt making much sense, seeing as C and C# wont exist in the same key seeing as if C# exists in a key, all C's are sharp. thus, C would not be in the scale. now C could be used as an accidental flat, but it still wouldnt be in the scale
In speed versus emotional playing, i think of an M16 versus an M24. You can have 650 rounds per minute, or one round, one kill. Both should be in your arsenal.

PSN and XBL: xxWONDERxxBOYxx
Leave a message that you're from UG with your username
#8
what is the point of your song if you dont mind me asking?
In speed versus emotional playing, i think of an M16 versus an M24. You can have 650 rounds per minute, or one round, one kill. Both should be in your arsenal.

PSN and XBL: xxWONDERxxBOYxx
Leave a message that you're from UG with your username
#10
I agree with Myshadow46_2 - the way he initially explained it was confusing, but I agree. The F# blues scale will work well - 1 b3 4 b5 5 b7 8 or F# A B C C# E F#.

However, your progression is kinda weird since it contains the A#. The root of each chord, F#, A# and C creates major chord with a flattened fifth. To me, this doesn't sound very stable, but that's just me.
#11
you could treat the F#5 as F# minor and the C5 and A#5 as C minor.

changing key with no more that a whole tone of movement.

ive made a few melodys with your progression using that.
#12
Quote by asr_larocca
Hey guys, I've ventured into the realm of song writing and I have some queries which I'm sure some of you more experienced gentlemen can answer. Please excuse my noobiness/inexperience. Let me try and explain:

Lets say the following is the rhythm part of a song being played by the rhythm guitarist and also the bassist (obviously relative to a bass):

|--------|--------|--------|
|--x12--|--x4--|--x12--|
|--------|--------|--------|
|--4-----|---10--|---8----|
|--4-----|---10--|---8----|
|--2-----|----8--|----6---|

Now here is the theoretical part or so to speak. Say the lead part is to be playing some sort of riff/melody or what-not to accompany the song, where would this be played? I guess I'm asking what key? What scales would be used for it to be harmonious?

So using the above example, the rhythm is compromised by F#, C & A# power-chords. So what key am I playing melody in?! F#? C? A#?

Thanx heaps ya'll!

K.


Since you don't know theory yet, and we can only give opinions and argue with each other over them...... why don't you try something simple...

use your own ears and use the notes that sound good to you.

If you want to be able to analyze something like that from a theoretical perspective, you could start studying theory. Then eventually, after you've put in the time/work, you'll be able to utilize that knowledge.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 17, 2009,
#13
Just make a "scale" that fits with the notes of the song. In my opinion, as long as the notes all sound right, you're doing it right. Then the lead can play it along with the rhythm. I can't really tell you much else than that since I'm just learning theory myself. I'll leave all that stuff to the others who know more about it.
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Who's going to stop you? The music police?
Last edited by FacetOfChaos at Aug 17, 2009,