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#1
I've seen so many people recommend this book on here. I checked it out from the library yesterday, and finished it the same day. It was kind of interesting, but I don't see why it's so recommended....... it's just some dude who keeps screwing up his life and has no tolerance for the average asshole you meet out on the street. For those of you who really think this should be a classic, could you explain to me what the point was?
#2
Relatively good book/literature thread.
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Quote by OneOfTheseDays
My friends cat smokes, wears a leather jacket and swears at me when i look at it.He is really fat so it makes it even more funny.
#3
Catch her, in the eye!

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#4
I think it's brilliant because it says, "**** you" to the common requirements of storytelling. Nobody can really describe the plot. It's just a crazy bunch of things happening to this teenager with more than a few issues.
It's also ****in hilarious
#5
Hmm I had to read to book as well for English literature, but me niether could understand why this book was so special. I really don't get it. But it's alright I think.
#6
I've never read it. Maybe I should.
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'member The Pit of 10'? oH, I 'member!


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#7
I actually hated the book, but I think I hated it because I found Holden to be whiny and annoying, and as he narrated the book, you couldn't really get away from him. I also did think it was very well written, which I found weird because I LOVE most of J.D. Salingers stuff...
#8
Fear and Loathing In Las Vegas is much better.

longing rusted furnace daybreak seventeen benign nine homecoming one freight car
#10
Quote by DardoBoy
I actually hated the book, but I think I hated it because I found Holden to be whiny and annoying, and as he narrated the book, you couldn't really get away from him. I also did think it was very well written, which I found weird because I LOVE most of J.D. Salingers stuff...

That's kind of what I mean. Holden had no ability to just deal with it when something happened to him, and on top of that, he was just an idiot. He kept using the same expressions so repeatedly I wanted to kill him. I mean, the story itself was kind of interesting, and I wouldn't call reading it a waste of time, I just don't get why it's so popular.
#13
Quote by stratdud39
i love it...others hate it.
clearly your on the hate side.
What the point of this thread, anyway? How is someone going to explain to you the point of the book? You've already read the damn thing.

It's not as much to explain the point, but I'm curious as to why it would be considered a classic; it's always best to know the opposing side to things, plus, I'm just curious. I'm not shooting down anyone who loved it or anything, and I wouldn't say I hate it, I just don't get why it's considered a classic.
#14
I had to read it for english, got bored less than halfway, never finished it. I also don't get what makes it so great.

It's certainly different, but it's not a very good read. If I met Holden Caulfield, I'd probably hate that guy.
#16
I have less than a week to read it. I hate English.
There's a special sex move I do called the Charizard.
It's where you light the girls pubes, then put it out with your cum and run around the room flapping your arms screaming, "You don't have enough badges to train me!"
#17
Quote by JackWhite333
John Lennon's killer was reading it...

We should have people not read it ever again. It makes the reader want to kill former Beatles!!!!
Due what you want as long as you vote Due!
#18
Quote by herby190
It's not as much to explain the point, but I'm curious as to why it would be considered a classic; it's always best to know the opposing side to things, plus, I'm just curious. I'm not shooting down anyone who loved it or anything, and I wouldn't say I hate it, I just don't get why it's considered a classic.



fair enough, i dont have a real good answer for why it would be a classic, tbh
#19
i cant really explain why i liked it so much i just did.

i related to Holden and watching his metal health slowly go was kinda cool.
There is a war going on for your mind.

If you are thinking, you are winning.


Resistance is victory.


We are building up a new world.
Do not sit idly by.
#20
Quote by herby190
It's not as much to explain the point, but I'm curious as to why it would be considered a classic; it's always best to know the opposing side to things, plus, I'm just curious. I'm not shooting down anyone who loved it or anything, and I wouldn't say I hate it, I just don't get why it's considered a classic.


Because it was extremely commercially successful, and to some it has an interesting point.
Due what you want as long as you vote Due!
#21
i liked it because the message i got from it was that no matter what you do you're still powerless against the outside world. Meaning no matter what you do you still cant really control how the outside world influences you.
trying to piece his 2 and 2 together
#23
If you read it when you were 15 or 16 (which I assume most of you did), it's not going to make complete sense, I think, unless you're personally having an exceptionally difficult period and can identify it. Some people identify with Holden's masochistic personality, while others dub him "whiny" for the same reasons.

Best way I can think to describe it? Take your favorite guitarist. People who do not play guitar probably can't understand why you like him/her as much as you do nor appreciate his/her technique because they simply don't have the experience to do so. It's exactly that way with a book of this style; if you can't identify with it, you won't understand it, and thus hate it (or just be bored).
#24
It's not a good book in my opinion, you get to follow some angsty teen through the whole book and hear him talk about how fake he thinks everyone is, when in reality he's just as fake.

Reminds me of when I was like 13 and though I was sooo smart and could see through everyone and I was all rebellious. This kid's parents are even paying for his schooling, what a brat.
#25
Quote by hunterman
If you read it when you were 15 or 16 (which I assume most of you did), it's not going to make complete sense, I think, unless you're personally having an exceptionally difficult period and can identify it. Some people identify with Holden's masochistic personality, while others dub him "whiny" for the same reasons.

Best way I can think to describe it? Take your favorite guitarist. People who do not play guitar probably can't understand why you like him/her as much as you do nor appreciate his/her technique because they simply don't have the experience to do so. It's exactly that way with a book of this style; if you can't identify with it, you won't understand it, and thus hate it (or just be bored).


Maybe you're right; I hated his masochistic, self-destructiveness. He never actually seemed to care or think about what he did, and that bugged me.
#26
Quote by technicolour
It's not a good book in my opinion, you get to follow some angsty teen through the whole book and hear him talk about how fake he thinks everyone is, when in reality he's just as fake.

Reminds me of when I was like 13 and though I was sooo smart and could see through everyone and I was all rebellious. This kid's parents are even paying for his schooling, what a brat.



Angsty is an understatement. The guy hangs out with hookers and get sent to a mental institution.

edit:

Quote by herby190

Maybe you're right; I hated his masochistic, self-destructiveness. He never actually seemed to care or think about what he did, and that bugged me.


I actually found his masochism quite entertaining. I guess I identified with the self-destructive aspect of him slightly, even more so when he characterizes people and reduces them to stereotypical caricatures without even knowing them. I do that too. I instantly judge people when I meet them so I don't have to waste my time getting to know them if I think I won't like them anyway. Kind of mean, but true.
Last edited by hunterman at Aug 17, 2009,
#28
Quote by EndTheRapture51
Fear and Loathing In Las Vegas is much better.


Brilliant book, highly reccommend watching Gonzo the documentary narrated by Johnny Depp.
#30
I don't understand how books like this, with such mundane stories and decent writing become "masterpieces," while books like Stephen King's "The Stand" go pretty much uncelebrated by anyone besides his genre's main readers and those loyal to him. A book like "The Stand" or "The Green Mile" belongs alongside F. Scott Fitzgerald and Hemmingway.
"Life was such a wheel that no man could stand upon it for long.
And it always, at the end, came round to the same place again."

- Stephen King, The Stand
#31
I loved that book, but only cause I can relate with Holden a lot.

People tell me that I remind them of Holden; should I be scared?
#32
Quote by joehhy
I loved that book, but only cause I can relate with Holden a lot.

People tell me that I remind them of Holden; should I be scared?

Just don't buy a hooker out of an elevator from a pimp named Maurice, and all should be fine.
#33
Quote by herby190
Just don't buy a hooker out of an elevator from a pimp named Maurice, and all should be fine.


Yeah, be wary. He might plug ya.
#34
Well what I got from the book is that everyone has a bit of Holden inside of them. Everyone thinks down of people sometimes, everyone thinks of themselves as being "real". It's just the way people perceive things, and that's what made me enjoy it.

The thing is that when I read it, I hated it, but after a week or two I thought about it again and realized why it made so much sense.
#35
its good because most of us relate to it when we think of how we were when we were 15-16. if you dont relate to it then ur lucky.
#36
It was a summer reading book for me during high-school. I didn't like it when I read it either, but after going to class and learning about all the symbols, character analysis etc....I started to appreciate the book a lot.
#37
I read it and thought wth? i heard that there were a lot of crimes commited when this was published. It was "banned" from certain regions in the world...correct me if I'm wrong?
Anywhere is possible.
#38
Quote by AJKane
I don't understand how books like this, with such mundane stories and decent writing become "masterpieces," while books like Stephen King's "The Stand" go pretty much uncelebrated by anyone besides his genre's main readers and those loyal to him. A book like "The Stand" or "The Green Mile" belongs alongside F. Scott Fitzgerald and Hemmingway.


I just finished The Stand, I think that and The Dark Tower are the best of his works. I have heard a lot of praise for The Stand, it seems pretty celebrated to me.
Due what you want as long as you vote Due!
#39
You have to put these things into the periods they came out... Catcher In The Rye came out in 1951, and introduced the idea of a 'teenager', angst and adolescent rebellion. The way he acts was completely unthought of, and absolutely not the way that young people were taught and thought to act at the time. It gave all young adults a sense of freedom and rebellion which was previously repressed in society.
Friends, applaud the comedy is over.


I'd dance with you but...


#40
Quote by Splashed
I think it's brilliant because it says, "**** you" to the common requirements of storytelling. Nobody can really describe the plot. It's just a crazy bunch of things happening to this teenager with more than a few issues.
It's also ****in hilarious


I agree. I also think that Holden is very idealistic, but everyone can sympathize with him, especially teens who read the book.
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