#1
Basically I'm looking for a new camera to replace my old one, and, having little knowledge of cameras or photography, i'm flummoxed, so I was hoping somebody here may be able to help out

I guess I'm just asking to get some light shed on some terms, like ISO numbers, and was wondering if anybody could suggest any camera, in the £100-£200 sort of range. The main things I'd want to improve on from my old one are a higher resolution (i'm looking for about 10 atm) and the ability to do a decent quality video, with sound.

If any one of you people is willing or able to help, cheers!
#3
Look into the Lumix range by Samsung(?) i have on of these and they're damn good compacts.
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#4
How "into" photography are you?

If you're really really into it, I would look for a cheaper used DSLR. If it's more of just an occasional hobby, I would look more into a standard point and shoot. I don't have much experience with much of the new stuff out there, but check some reviews on the internet (cnet tends to be pretty accurate).

I bought a Sony DSC-H50 a while back, and I find it to be a good balance between point and shoot and DSLR. It gives you good control over camera options, but without worrying about different lenses and whatnot.

Quote by Oosh.
Look into the Lumix range by Samsung(?) i have on of these and they're damn good compacts.


I have heard good things about the Lumix line.
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#5
well ISO number is the ability of the film to react to light. if youre going to be in a well lit place, like outside in sunlight, youd want a smaller ISO number on your film. but if inside with minimal light youd want a larger number.
and what, is that like almost 300 american dollars? you cant really get an amazing camera with that but you should try to get a DSLR. a canon would probably be what youd want, but you could spend a little more for the cheapest nikon and be set for life lol



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Last edited by reldask at Aug 17, 2009,
#6
I couldn't recommand a good camera to you, being quite noobish in that field, but I am able to add that iso has a lot to do with your camera's shutterspeed. For example, a fully manual SLR (single lens) camera usually shows you the right combinations between iso and shutter speed, as, quite logically, a higher iso will need a fast shutter speed to prevent overlighting, and the other way around for a low iso. The great thing about these slr's being so manual (or usually half-automatic) is a much greater control of the photographer over his or her photography.

But theory aside, these camara's are usually very expensive, and might not be the ones you are looking for. A decent slr may be over €600.

But yeah it depends on what kind of photography you want to do, pop into a photography shop some time and let the shopkeeper advise you. (be wary of selling tricks though )
Last edited by Skythedragon at Aug 17, 2009,
#7
I'm not "really" into photography, I just generally want a newer camera for general picture taking, but I'd quite like one that can take nice pictures of scenery and things, as the mood sometimes takes me. My old one couldn't really get anything in detail at all, and had a rubbish range on it, so didn't really satisfy my needs.

I'll take a look at what you guys have said so far!
#8
and what, is that like almost 300 american dollars? you cant really get an amazing camera with that but you should try to get a DSLR. a canon would probably be what youd want, but you could spend a little more for the cheapest nikon and be set for life lol


Bad advice. 1, the cheapest nikon will NOT set you for life. Secondly, he shouldn't try to get a DSLR if that's not what he wants.


+1 to the Panasonic Lumix line. Neat little things. I normally shoot with a Canon 450D but I always have my lumix on me.


ISO numbers as a poster well said above is the camera's film or in digitals case sensor's light sensitivity. Higher ISO, more light coming in but more noise in the picture. Point and shoots will adjust this automatically.


EDIT:

Here take a look at this mate!

http://computershopper.com/digital-cameras-camcorders/point-and-shoot-cameras/top-5-point-and-shoot-cameras
Last edited by Confusius at Aug 17, 2009,
#9
Quote by Confusius
Bad advice. 1, the cheapest nikon will NOT set you for life. Secondly, he shouldn't try to get a DSLR if that's not what he wants.


+1 to the Panasonic Lumix line. Neat little things. I normally shoot with a Canon 450D but I always have my lumix on me.


ISO numbers as a poster well said above is the camera's film or in digitals case sensor's light sensitivity. Higher ISO, more light coming in but more noise in the picture. Point and shoots will adjust this automatically.


Yeah I agree that a decent point and shoot might be the best choice for this price range. They are not 'professional', but a good one can take really beautiful pictures.

I personally advice one with no batteries but and accu, because it's less hassle and you can recharge them by connecting them to your computer, very useful indeed.
#10
The PowerShot looks great. Kensai (a really good photographer appart from a funny guy, check out his posts in the photography thread) shoots with a really good Canon dSLR but he also has the Powershot and has posted some pictures with it.