#1
I was just wondering... In the guitar realm could we speak about a point of diminishing return? If not then i would expect no replies on this thread but if true, where would that point be situated on the pricing scale of guitars? Where's the threeshold where we start paying more and more cash for less and less benefits in tone and quality increase? How about it guys ? What do you think?
#2
I definitely believe in diminising return for guitars and espcially acoustic guitars.

The example of diminishing returns is so stupidly obvious for acoustics as you can get a well playing "piece of junk" for very little money. But you could pay thousands and thousands and get an all solid guitar.

However, people with no knowledge on acoustic guitars wouldn't be able to distinguish the two guitars between each other except for the looks.
#3
I remember a guy who said that he couldnt distinguish between a 200$ and a 2000$ of the same brand. But its not objectively relevant what this category of novices think about the matter. I'm mostly interested what experienced players who played alot of acoustic guitars think about the matter... I'm not one of them and i dont have a chance to be because i just dont have big guitar stores around me or a trained discerning ear.

For instance could we say that a $1500 Martin is $800 better than a $700 all solid wood Seagull? Or could we speak about a diminishing return here? Its just an example that crossed my mind, i havent tried any of them ... You can think of whatever models you're familiar with...
#4
my philosophy is... if you can't hear the difference then you might as well settle with something you like in your price range. i've played $300 guitars i thought sounded pretty good, but not as well as an $800 guitar. if that sound is worth an extra $500 then go for it.
Warmoth Telecaster Deluxe. Warmoth Strat. Seagull Artist Portrait Acoustic.

"Well good God damn and other such phrases, I haven't heard a beat like this in ages!"
-Dan Le Sac Vs The Scroobius Pip
#5
Quote by OvidiuDanut
I remember a guy who said that he couldnt distinguish between a 200$ and a 2000$ of the same brand. But its not objectively relevant what this category of novices think about the matter. I'm mostly interested what experienced players who played alot of acoustic guitars think about the matter... I'm not one of them and i dont have a chance to be because i just dont have big guitar stores around me or a trained discerning ear.

For instance could we say that a $1500 Martin is $800 better than a $700 all solid wood Seagull? Or could we speak about a diminishing return here? Its just an example that crossed my mind, i havent tried any of them ... You can think of whatever models you're familiar with...


Can't distinguish between $200 and $2000? Whoever that guy is, he has no ear. When you stretch the price point that far, there's something wrong if the sound isn't any better.

Really, the difference between a cheap guitar and an expensive guitar is how much attention and care is given in creating the guitar. Not necessarily how good it sounds. Cheap guitars are made by production line workers. Expensive ones are hand made and given lots of care by a professional luthier. That's the difference, really.

From what I've played, $1000 guitars and $2000 guitars can sound equally(or at least very similarly) good. It's just that the $3000 guitar is just better built.

So to answer your question from my own bias, I think about $1000 is when the diminishing returns really start to kick in. There are exceptions, of course, but for the most part... once you spend about $1000 and get all solid wood, that's where the line starts.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#6
the best sounding guitar i've ever heard is $6600. i fell in love with the sound before i discovered the price. it sounded amazing - just amazing. it also felt great to play.

i don't have trouble telling the more expensive guitars from the less by listening. the first huss & dalton i every played didn't look special and i had never heard of them, but after playing it for a minute, i wasn't surprised to discover when i asked that it cost $4995 - it sounded very good, with nuances you don't get from a factory made guitar.

having said that, i've also never played a truly high end acoustic that didn't feel solid with more care taken with the edges and finish than is taken with a $1000 or $2000 guitar.
#7
Quote by obeythepenguin
Anyway, speaking as someone who has obviously never owned a high-end guitar, I'd probably take my comparatively low-end Seagulls with ancient strings over many more expensive instruments


me too. it might just be a sentimental thing, but i'm really not sentimental about my guitars. but i shopped carefully, and i'd take my $1000 seagull over most $2000 guitars if i were offered an even trade. it's features are exactly what i was looking for.

about knowing a higher end instrument... i would know an instrument was above or below $1000 i think. but once they're above that point it's tough to tell the ones that sell for $10,000 and the ones that sell for $1500 apart to me.
Warmoth Telecaster Deluxe. Warmoth Strat. Seagull Artist Portrait Acoustic.

"Well good God damn and other such phrases, I haven't heard a beat like this in ages!"
-Dan Le Sac Vs The Scroobius Pip