#1
Yes, my blues band, how do i make them? Like the one in Aerosmith's Big Ten Inch Record. Please help. Thanks. I want to write a few to a couple chords or something
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#2
Just start on the same note and work your way forward/down on the fretboard?
Spice it with some octaves?
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#3
what about scales?
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Quote by djmay71
it wasn't 7 days, it was 5.

and you call yourself the son of catholics

Quote by hugh20
I would keep it on my mantel piece and tell my grandchildren about the day I tried to overthrow the human race with my race of tree-men.
#4
I have absolutely nothing to say when it comes to scales.
Or, find one in the right key.
Follow the smoke toward the riff filled land
brutal
#5
Well, what are basic blues chords to write walking lines to.
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Quote by djmay71
it wasn't 7 days, it was 5.

and you call yourself the son of catholics

Quote by hugh20
I would keep it on my mantel piece and tell my grandchildren about the day I tried to overthrow the human race with my race of tree-men.
#6
First off, start transcribing. Transcribe transcribe transcribe.

The next thing is to start just writing lines. The main thing to keep in mind is that your trying to find the most melodic way to walk "through" the chords, instead of just getting from one chord to the next
#7
also keep mind it's okay to use chromatic tones or non chord tones to get to your next chord. It usually makes for a more unique and interesting bass line anyways
#9
*facepalm* just play around on a standard blues scale. There are more techniques to good walking bass lines but to get started that's all you need. Just play the scale that's in condolence with the chord and you're good to go
#10
if ur playing blues, try walking through a "i iv i iv i v vi i" type pattern. and by that i make an example of the the key of G.

Start by playing a bar in G (the "i") then the next bar in C (iv), then repeat these two bars again So: /G/C/G/C/G then to the turn around (the v) which would be a D in the key of G. then back down to the c and back around. the chord pattern would look something like this then:

G C G C G D C G /:.

the actual chord though would depend on whether your playing in a minor or major key....the only real difference being the third note of the chord (in the key of G that would mean a major third being a B or a minor third being a Bb). Alot of blues guys play on a dominant chord, which is identical to the major scale ( G A B C D E F# G) except instead of an F# it is a F. So the same chord only the seventh note of the chord is flat. Or the blues scale is used which would look like ( G Bb C Db D F G ).

If you just practice playing notes from these scales as you walk through the chords (maybe four quarter notes per chord) you'll begin forming note structures that you like and can use.

What kind of chords are you going to be playing through?
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#11
#12
And epy just explained how to start getting complicated on walking, then again he's an upright player so unless he doesn't touch jazz/blues at all then he's doing this alot....but yea those lessons/forums help explain it too so ts get to walking my friend
#13
What I usually do is use notes from the relevant chord to walk up/down to the root of the next chord on beats 1-3 (but it depends on where my next note is and other factors of course) and then move chromatically on beat 4. Sounds really nice IMO when for example you're going from G to C. I go G - B (3rd) - D (5th) - C# - C.
#14
to put it simply, this is one of the things that makes bass really fun (to me) as an intermediate. i haven't yet gotten to the point where i see a chord progression and know exactly what i'm going to play.

basically, and i don't know the technical language yet (just switched to a music-bass major at school), the simplest way of putting it is find common tones that lead from one chord to another. so let's say this is a simple walking line for:

G - C - D

ok. a G is made up of?

G B D

C is made up of?

C G E

D is made up of?

D F# A

so let's say we play G for two measures, C for one, D for one.

we could do something like this. it's essentially just major triads with some chromatics and G major scale thrown in for fun:



  G                  G                  C                  D
G------------------|------------------|------------------|------------------|
D------------------|------------------|-----0---2---3----|-4-----7---5------|
A----2---5---3-----|-2-------5--4-----|-3----------------|----5-------------|
E-3----------------|-----3------------|------------------|------------------|


so the first bar is just a G major triad (G-B-D) that goes down to the C (the fourth in the scale) to resolve back to the B which starts the second bar. you then go to the root (G) and to the fifth (D) which chromatically walks down to the C# (a chromatic passing tone) as a means to reach the C in a not-so-abrupt manner. the way i have it written here, you go from the C to a D (major second) to the third (E) and then chromatically walk up to F# which is the 3rd in a D major chord.

another way to walk to C from G easily is this way:

  G                  C                  
G------------------|------------------|
D--------0---1-----|-2-------5---4----|
A----2-------------|-----3------------|
E-3----------------|------------------|


so instead of walking down from G's fifth to C's root, i walked from G's fifth up to C's third. both work (AFAIK)

if i'm wrong on any of this, someone please tell me. i'm still in the learning process and this may not be a good example. as far as i know, walking means:

- know your chord construction
- know when to use chromatics
- know your major scale

find a way to link chords together smoothly. like i said, i'm an amateur and did this on the fly. going to the third so much might not be a great idea. i'm just trying to give an example from what i know.
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#15
When i walk, i read the chords on the chart, play around on that scale for the bar or whatever and link it to the next. Avoid lingering on notes that don't mix with the chord, usually a third or sharpened/flattened seventh but if your just playing over them quickly they sound great.

I like to start with roots fifths and octaves first and once i get a feel for the chart i'll branch off. Always be ready for chord changed though.

Also +1 to the post above me, linking chords isn't that hard, generally I find the common notes between the scales which is most of them anyway, except maybe 1 or 2, and then just run to the next change.

EDIT: i don't think walking up to C's third from G's fifth will work unless you play C the note after the E or else it'll sound like your in E minor.
Last edited by Bass First at Aug 18, 2009,
#16
I like to put the root, then a note from the blues scale for that note and two notes from the specific chord with a standard 4/4 beat. that's my 2 cents, its pretty well covered by these geniuses. remember to move closer to the note!!!!
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#17
Practice your scales and arppegiated chords. aguacateojos pretty much posted the lessons I would have pointed you to.

Its something that takes a great deal of practice and work to be proficient. My current jazz teacher always says to start the chord change off with a tone from the chord and then build from there. And don't neglect your pocket in all of this--unless you hit a blatantly wrong note, no one is going to notice it, but the audience and the rest of the band will notice the moment you drop a beat or go off beat.
#18
Someone said the blues scale, but in a major blues progression, I think the major scale (or more specifically, the mixolydian scale) works better, because you're playing major chords and dominant seventh chords, which have 1 3 5 (and b7 in dominant 7s), which is the perfect formula for major pentatonic or mixolydian scale. What I do in a major blues progression is I play a lot of the major third, but I use some "passing" notes and such mimicking the blues scale/minor scale.

P.S. Am I correct in calling the scale with WWHWWHW the mixolydian scale, since it has the same structure as the mixolydian mode would?
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Last edited by food1010 at Aug 18, 2009,
#19
Mixolydian is the same as the major scale but with a flatted 7th. It works well over dominant 7th chords. In the mixolydian mode, the tonic note is the 5th.
#20
Quote by anarkee
no one is going to notice it, but the audience and the rest of the band will notice the moment you drop a beat or go off beat.


YES. I played at a jazz jam a few weeks ago and that was the biggest problem - I got confused and stopped playing, which was much worse than playing "wrong" notes and finding my way back in. Embarrassing but a good lesson.