#1
i am using a psp to post this so it takes a long time , anyway as the title says. i might not respond but just read , (sharp between treble and time sig.)
#2
Yes. If your key signature says to sharp or flat a note, you sharp or flat it, regardless if it is in a chord or not, unless that note has a natural sign next to it.
Last edited by Dregen at Aug 17, 2009,
#3
Quote by Dregen
Yes. If your key signature says to sharp or flat a note, you sharp or flat it, regardless if it is in a chord or not, unless that note has a natural sign next to it.



glad you understood what he meant hahaha. i had no clue.
Too cool for a signature.
#4
Since when could PSPs post stuff online?! Woah! Damn those kids and their new-fangled technology these days!
#5
Quote by zephyrclaw
Since when could PSPs post stuff online?! Woah! Damn those kids and their new-fangled technology these days!


I know, it's amazing
#6
say you're playing in D major - the key sig has a F# and C#. if there was then a notes written on the lines for A C and E the c would become C# as that's what's in the key sig making the chord A instead of Am. So yes it does affect it

if you mean the pattern of chords then no no matter how many #/b in the key sig the pattern of intervals for a major scale will still be the same so you will still have the same I ii iii IV V vi vii* pattern of chords relative to the scale
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#7
Quote by doive
say you're playing in D major - the key sig has a F# and C#. if there was then a notes written on the lines for A C and E the c would become C# as that's what's in the key sig making the chord A instead of Am. So yes it does affect it

if you mean the pattern of chords then no no matter how many #/b in the key sig the pattern of intervals for a major scale will still be the same so you will still have the same I ii iii IV V vi vii* pattern of chords relative to the scale

this ^

you'll see a natural sign if the music wants you to fall outside the key sig (but then the natural becomes the rule until it's sharpened or flattened again).
#8
Actually, everyone who has posted so far is wrong.

Your in the key of say, C. Above the next bar, the chord is written as A. You play C sharp for the section that the A is written over. Also, if your soloing, you play out of the A scale.

But thats only if the chords are written on top. If they are notated on the staff, then you follow whatever sharps/flats/naturals are marked
#9
Quote by tubatom868686
Actually, everyone who has posted so far is wrong.

Your in the key of say, C. Above the next bar, the chord is written as A. You play C sharp for the section that the A is written over. Also, if your soloing, you play out of the A scale.

But thats only if the chords are written on top. If they are notated on the staff, then you follow whatever sharps/flats/naturals are marked


wtf? lol
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#10
Quote by tubatom868686
Actually, everyone who has posted so far is wrong.

Your in the key of say, C. Above the next bar, the chord is written as A. You play C sharp for the section that the A is written over. Also, if your soloing, you play out of the A scale.

But thats only if the chords are written on top. If they are notated on the staff, then you follow whatever sharps/flats/naturals are marked


I woudn't say we were wrong, just wrong in the particular situation you described.
#11
Quote by tubatom868686
Actually, everyone who has posted so far is wrong.

Your in the key of say, C. Above the next bar, the chord is written as A. You play C sharp for the section that the A is written over. Also, if your soloing, you play out of the A scale.

But thats only if the chords are written on top. If they are notated on the staff, then you follow whatever sharps/flats/naturals are marked


I know what you're saying, and in that sense, you are right. If he is given a piece of music for the guitar with the chord changes written as opposed to the melody it is likely that it will just be the chords above the bars with rhythm slashes inside the bars. You would play whatever chord is written above that bar/beat regardless of what the key signature says.

However, the previous posts did answer the question in general terms of theory. It really depends on what TS is actually asking.
#12
...ok...

I've seen what you're talking about... I usually see that sort of thing on sheet music that includes TAB, but last time I checked, TAB wasn't considered standard notation. In standard notation, you don't get that, and that's what everyone except you has been using to base their answers on.
but when you flip to the back of your guitarworld mag, play a C chord when it says to play a C.
#13
Quote by GrisKy
...ok...

I've seen what you're talking about... I usually see that sort of thing on sheet music that includes TAB, but last time I checked, TAB wasn't considered standard notation. In standard notation, you don't get that, and that's what everyone except you has been using to base their answers on.
but when you flip to the back of your guitarworld mag, play a C chord when it says to play a C.
You must have only played classical sheets. Both Jazz and popular music (in notation) write the chords out above the staff.
#14
Quote by rockinrider55
You must have only played classical sheets. Both Jazz and popular music (in notation) write the chords out above the staff.


this is true.

EDIT: "true" in the sense that that's what I was referring to above. I'm also into rock/other forms of popular contemporary music, where I have seen the chords outlined. I wasn't saying that doesn't happen, or that it's wrong, but rather that everyone was posting based on face-value standard notaion rather than mentioning ever single instance when the rules don't QUITE apply.
Last edited by GrisKy at Aug 19, 2009,
#15
Quote by tubatom868686
Actually, everyone who has posted so far is wrong.

Your in the key of say, C. Above the next bar, the chord is written as A. You play C sharp for the section that the A is written over. Also, if your soloing, you play out of the A scale.

But thats only if the chords are written on top. If they are notated on the staff, then you follow whatever sharps/flats/naturals are marked


What you're describing is the chords in the progression. Those letters don't tell you what scale to play or in what key it is.

If the key is C then youre playing in Cmajor and in that scale, every other note you choose to play are chromatics that you added.

there's no such thing as "playing out of the A scale" in a progression created of the key of C.
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