#1
I have this thought from time to time (usually while listening to Billy Howerdel stuff where he uses piano melodies along side distorted guitar) and wonder if it would sound any good running a clean tone with a heavily distorted tone (both playing the same thing) for certain things.

Does anyone know of any bands that have done that/do that? And whether it sounds alright or not?
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#2
I've actually also thought about that, but I haven't got a clue on how it would sound irl.
#4
I do this a lot. A heavily overdriven Valve Junior, run with a chimey clean Bassman and it sounds awesome. The Valve Junior is too muddy and dark when overdriven that hard, and the Bassman is too scooped an punchy. The two together is incredible, rich creamy overdrive with crystal clear definition.
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#5
Beaten to it, but Steve Vai runs 2 overdriven Legacies with a Fender amp running clean in the middle.
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#6
Ahk, thanks. Shoulda known with Vai, I saw his GW gear walkthrough and forgot about that lil Fender he uses.
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#7
The Meshuggah boys ran two amp models in stereo when they were using Line 6 Vetta II amps. Trent Reznor from NIN does the same on occasions, as said, to add definition.
#8
I may put some clips up of doing this, later this week. Would I have to mic both, or would a mic in the middle be sufficient?
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#9
^you will need 2 mics. Something you also need to keep in mind is the phase of the amps. 2 amps running out of phase with each other doesn't sound great.

SRV liked to do this on his studio stuff. It's said that he liked to use between 3 and 6 amps at any given time.
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#10
Quote by CorduroyEW
^you will need 2 mics. Something you also need to keep in mind is the phase of the amps. 2 amps running out of phase with each other doesn't sound great.

SRV liked to do this on his studio stuff. It's said that he liked to use between 3 and 6 amps at any given time.

How do I know if they are in phase or not? I am currently doing it one of two ways; cascading through the Bassman's second input into the Valve Junior (which I understand can cause phase issues) or setting my DD-3 to wet/dry with the shortest delay time, and 12 oclock repeats/feedback. I think both are probably poor ways to do it, but I can't afford an ABY right now.

I don't really know what 'out of phase' means, so that will probably be necessary for me to understand.
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Unless its electronic drums.

BURN THE WITCH!!!!!
#11
I've utilized three amps before in the studio for one tone and it worked out very well, but it took me a long time to be fully satisified.
Amp mic'ing is that bit more detailed and important when you're dealing with so many different tones and frequencies.
#13
Quote by tubetime86
How do I know if they are in phase or not? I am currently doing it one of two ways; cascading through the Bassman's second input into the Valve Junior (which I understand can cause phase issues) or setting my DD-3 to wet/dry with the shortest delay time, and 12 oclock repeats/feedback. I think both are probably poor ways to do it, but I can't afford an ABY right now.

I don't really know what 'out of phase' means, so that will probably be necessary for me to understand.
Out of phase: Having waveforms that are of the same frequency but do not pass through corresponding values at the same instant.
Which, to me, means that an oscillation (waveform) are out of phase with each other. Thus creating a mishaped tone (similar to the way in which phase pedals work... I think).

This is a brief example that makes rough sense. I can't really it explain any further than what I've already done, to be honest.

"A phase difference is analogous to two athletes running around a race track at the same speed and direction but starting at different positions on the track. They pass a point at different instants in time. But the time difference (phase difference) between them is a constant - same for every pass since they are at the same speed and in the same direction. If they were at different speeds (different frequencies), the phase difference is undefined and would only reflect different starting positions. Technically, phase difference between two entities at various frequencies is undefined and does not exist."
#14
Thx. I figured that's what it was, roughly. I can't really apply that knowledge because I barely understand amps/electronics, but thank you.
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Unless its electronic drums.

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#15
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Geddy Lee does that, but he's a bassist...






^ That's correct. The rotisserie chicken oven in the middle is set for a clean tone while the other two are slightly distorted.
#16
You have to do it just right or it sounds really weird.


Oh and tubetime @ your sig, I must've missed that one!
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#17


WTF are those?

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Oh and tubetime @ your sig, I must've missed that one!


Just saw that today. I'm not saying you weren't right, but I find his logic amusing.
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Unless its electronic drums.

BURN THE WITCH!!!!!
#18
As of 1996, Lee no longer uses traditional bass amplifiers on stage, as he prefers to go direct into the venue's FOH console which helps the sound reinforcement during their concerts. Faced with the dilemma of what to do with the empty space left behind by the lack of large amplifier cabinets, Lee chose to fill the space in a unique way. For the 2002 Vapor Trails tour, Lee lined his side of the stage with three coin-operated Maytag dryers. Other large appliances would appear later in the same space. (Lee had earlier decorated his side of the stage with unusual items. For the 1996-1997 Test for Echo tour, Lee's side sported a fully-stocked old-fashioned household refrigerator.)

For every concert that featured the dryers, Rush's crew would load them with specially-designed Rush-themed T-shirts, different from the shirts on sale to the general public. At the close of each show, Lee and Lifeson would then toss these special T-shirts into the arms of lucky audience members.

For the band's R30 tour, one dryer was replaced with a rotating shelf-style vending machine. It too was fully stocked and operational during shows.

When asked about the purpose of the dryers in interviews, Lee was purposefully vague. The irony and non sequitur of placing such unusual items on a concert stage were Lee's way of expressing his sense of humor. He fed the mystery by responding to one interview question about the dryers, saying he chose to use them for their "warm, dry tone".[citation needed] The dryers can be seen on the Rush in Rio DVD and the R30 DVD. The vending machine can be seen on the R30 DVD.

To add to the humorous effect, Lee's dryers were, purely for visual effect "miked" by the sound crew, just as a real amplifier would be.

In interviews dated May 2007, Lee has stated that he is considering entirely new non-musical equipment to further his established comic effect for Rush's Snakes & Arrows tour. The tour commenced June 13, 2007, with a show at the Hi-Fi Buys Amphitheatre in Atlanta, Georgia. The show prominently featured 3 Henhouse brand rotisserie chicken ovens on stage complete with an attendant in a chef's hat and apron to "tend" the chickens during the show.[25] Such unorthodox stage equipment has been continuously seen thereafter.
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Unless its electronic drums.

BURN THE WITCH!!!!!
#20
Quote by tubetime86
I do this a lot. A heavily overdriven Valve Junior, run with a chimey clean Bassman and it sounds awesome. The Valve Junior is too muddy and dark when overdriven that hard, and the Bassman is too scooped an punchy. The two together is incredible, rich creamy overdrive with crystal clear definition.

I have a similar setup where I overdrive my Champ 600 and pair it with my clean Blues Jr. With some stereo tremolo or delay, it sounds AWESOME.
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#22
frusciante runs 2 silver jubilees for a dirty sound and a 200 watt major for his clean sound
#23
Alex Lifeson has been running simultanious amps for years.

Aso...he uses two Hughes and Kettner tri amps for his main stereo tone along with two Switchblades panned hard left and right just to add the presence of another instrument. The results are a HUGE friggin' live tone. Often, he uses a piezo (acoustic) tone along with heavy distortion and it just sound glorious.
#24
Joe Bonammasa used to run his Jubilee clean all the time mixed in with his other amps but now he switches between dirty and clean depending on what he's doing.
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