#1
G#5 C#5 F#5 C#5 G#5 F#5
e|----------------------------------|
B|----------------------------------|
G|-------6---------6-----------------|
D|-6----6----4----6---6---4---------|
A|-6----4----4----4---6---4---------|
E|-4----------2--------4---2---------|

G#5 C#5 F#5 C#5 G#5
e|------------------------0---------|
B|------------------------0---------|
G|------6----------6-----0---------|
D|-6----6----4----6---6-------------|
A|-6----4----4----4---6-------------|
E|-4----------2---------4-------------|


So i've been playing guitar for 4 months now and I recently reached a guitar block, meaning I can't progress in skill. So I'm trying to learn songs that are supposedly easy, starting with this one.

The song is Green Day's American Idiot. I'm having HUGE trouble getting the speed to the write place, along with not hitting other strings, and my fingers getting out of line when transitioning chords.

So yea, if anyone could help me with this, I would be very grateful. Also if you could suggest how to get past this skill block.

P.S. Sorry about the misalignment on the tab.
#2
just practice it slowly, and the grandually speed it up.
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Well, technically it could be done, but only in the same way that you could change a cat into a hamburger. It's an unpleasant process, and nobody is happy with the result.
#3
that's exactly it, just practise really slow and watch out for your fingers moving out of position. to help with hitting the other strings, use your left hand to mute them, e.g. when playing the first G#5, lay your index finger across the strings lightly, that way if you hit the treble strings you won't get unwanted noise.
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#4
Yep, practice muting the strings you aren't playing. Also, try keeping your fretting-hand fingers in the same shape when you move from chord to chord. Putting them down 1 by 1 can make a lot of noise and slow things down.
#5
Speed isn't important, accuracy is so concentrate on learning to actually play the song properly before you worry about playing it fast.

Your skill block isn't a block at all, you're just expecting playing the guitar to be easier than it actually is - therefore you're puzzled as to why you can't do things you should be able to do. Except there's nothing you should be able to do, only stuff you can do and stuff you can't. The stuff you can do, that's because you've learned it and practiced it correctly...the stuff you can't do, that's because you didn't.

It's that simple
Actually called Mark!

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Last edited by steven seagull at Aug 19, 2009,
#6
Quote by steven seagull
Speed isn't important, accuracy is so concentrate on learning to actually play the song properly before you worry about playing it fast.

Your skill block isn't a block at all, you're just expecting playing the guitar to be easier than it actually is - therefore you're puzzled as to why you can't do things you should be able to do. Except there's nothing you should be able to do, only stuff you can do and stuff you can't. The stuff you can do, that's because you've learned it and practiced it correctly...the stuff you can't do, that's because you didn't.

It's that simple





lol jp, thanks guys
#7
Why play it like that?

You can play it with power chords and it's lots easier. =o

G# C# and F# are all the power chords in the riff. C# D# G# are the ones in the solo.
#8
I'm having trouble doing the muting with my strumming hand.. but I don't think I'm suppose to. I watched covers and all of them just pick freely with no muting.
#9
Quote by A7X3DG
I'm having trouble doing the muting with my strumming hand.. but I don't think I'm suppose to. I watched covers and all of them just pick freely with no muting.


Power chords, chords in general usually, don't require muting with your strumming hand. For power chords you mute everything higher with either your index or your other finger and everything lower with the tip of your index finger, for regular chords you can mute anything lower with either the tip of your index finger or your thumb, depending on chord shape.