#1
Hi, I have been playing guitar for 3 years now and i used to go to lessons but i dont any more. And my teacher never once mentioned scales so i thought they weren't important. But lately I have been told that scales are vital!

Can you please explain what scales are and some good ones to learn.

Please don't call me a noob or anything I just wasn't introduced to them.

Thank you,
Rian O'Ceallaigh
"I want a drink"

"You always want something. In Tibet, if they want something...they give something away"

"Do they? That must be why they are such a dominant global power"

Brought to you by Graham Linehan and Dylan Moran
#5
Quote by GuitarMunky

Im sorry but i didnt understand that. In normal english?
"I want a drink"

"You always want something. In Tibet, if they want something...they give something away"

"Do they? That must be why they are such a dominant global power"

Brought to you by Graham Linehan and Dylan Moran
#6
Quote by BoxerLadABC
Im sorry but i didnt understand that. In normal english?



That is normal english. If you don't understand it, you need to get some more basic concepts down 1st.

Can you read music?

If not, I'd start by getting that together.

Try some of the other links above as well, maybe they will help you out.

also, I've heard great things about this book.....
http://www.amazon.com/Music-Theory-Dummies-Michael-Pilhofer/dp/0764578383
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 19, 2009,
#7
Ive always just thought of scales as a group of notes that sound good together.
*flameshield engaged*
#8
Ok. After 4 hours i learned at lot about music theory!
I now have the Minor Pentatonic Scale and the Major Scale (I think)
Are there any other good ones?
"I want a drink"

"You always want something. In Tibet, if they want something...they give something away"

"Do they? That must be why they are such a dominant global power"

Brought to you by Graham Linehan and Dylan Moran
#9
Quote by pwrmax
http://www.musictheory.net/

Don't skip ahead to the lessons on scales if you don't know the stuff before it.


Thank you very much for that link!
Brilliant website!
"I want a drink"

"You always want something. In Tibet, if they want something...they give something away"

"Do they? That must be why they are such a dominant global power"

Brought to you by Graham Linehan and Dylan Moran
#10
Quote by BoxerLadABC
Ok. After 4 hours i learned at lot about music theory!
I now have the Minor Pentatonic Scale and the Major Scale (I think)
Are there any other good ones?



Nope. Those are the only scales with "feeling".
Check out my band Disturbed
#11
Quote by StewieSwan
Nope. Those are the only scales with "feeling".



Well, it depends. If you're just learning theory to learn theory, you could stop at the tip of the iceberg now. If you're going to solo or make your own solos, I'd recommend you learn about the modes. Those could certainly help you in your understanding of theory and soloing (check out Natural Minor...otherwise known as Aeolian).
Last edited by JP Oliver at Aug 19, 2009,
#12
Quote by StewieSwan
Nope. Those are the only scales with "feeling".

Sarcasm?

If not then I can assure you the phrygian dominant yields the most beautiful melodies, in my opinion anyway.
#13
Quote by BoxerLadABC
Ok. After 4 hours i learned at lot about music theory!
I now have the Minor Pentatonic Scale and the Major Scale (I think)
Are there any other good ones?
Lots. But before you worry about any of them make sure you've really nailed the major scale - and I mean so you understand how its constructed, and can play it all over the neck in any key. Then learn to harmonise it in 3rds so you can make yourself some backing tracks and start improvising with it

Pretty much every other scale you'll ever want to use can be derived from the major scale, so get that down and you're making all the others a whole lot easier.

Once you've really nailed the major scale, look at how the natural minor is related to it. Then look at how the pentatonics are related to the major and minor scale.

That should keep you going for a few weeks at least.
Last edited by zhilla at Aug 20, 2009,
#14
Quote by zhilla
Lots. But before you worry about any of them make sure you've really nailed the major scale - and I mean so you understand how its constructed, and can play it all over the neck in any key. Then learn to harmonise it in 3rds so you can make yourself some backing tracks and start improvising with it

Pretty much every other scale you'll ever want to use can be derived from the major scale, so get that down and you're making all the others a whole lot easier.

Once you've really nailed the major scale, look at how the natural minor is related to it. Then look at how the pentatonics are related to the major and minor scale.

That should keep you going for a few weeks at least.


This^

Don't rush into learning all the scales you can find. Learn the major scale so it is second nature.