#1
I am quite confused on the subject of modes and the sticky didn't answer my question directly, nor did the links (unless I'm not reading correctly). I have a working knowledge of modes, but I am seeking to expand my understanding into true music theory, not just a basic understanding.

Let's say I am playing C major (C, D, E, F, G, A, B). If I were to begin on a D and resolve to D while using that set of notes (now D, E, F, G, A, B, C), am I playing in D dorian? Assuming that I am using a progression that resolves to D, of course.

Thanks in advance for helpful comments.
#2
If you are playing a progression that resolves to D, and so the tonic is D, you would be playing in D Dorian.
#4
Please read the theory link in my sig and make sure you understand everything up to modes. Read the modes section, too, but you're trying to learn that now; it's not assumed that you already know it (duh).

After you've done that, please ask a specific question about what you don't understand. Ask us to reword a passage or explain a specific statement. Don't just say, "I don't get it," however.

To address your specific question, you are not necessarily playing D Dorian. Over a Dm C Dm C progression, which clearly resolves to Dm, you could throw in a B note (not chord, I hope that wasn't confusing). However, that B is simply a chromatic tone, not D Dorian.

Quote by Damius
Dorian Grey?

*reported*

Edit: In response to the below post by Damius, I would like to point out that the only question mark in this post appears in the section of the post where I quote Damius.

Edit 2: While not obvious, Munky's post does not contradict mine. That Dm G7 vamp is common for D Dorian. It's the chords that determine the mode more than the lead.
Last edited by bangoodcharlote at Aug 20, 2009,
#5
Quote by Geldin
I am quite confused on the subject of modes and the sticky didn't answer my question directly, nor did the links (unless I'm not reading correctly). I have a working knowledge of modes, but I am seeking to expand my understanding into true music theory, not just a basic understanding.

Let's say I am playing C major (C, D, E, F, G, A, B). If I were to begin on a D and resolve to D while using that set of notes (now D, E, F, G, A, B, C), am I playing in D dorian? Assuming that I am using a progression that resolves to D, of course.

Thanks in advance for helpful comments.


Yes if your progression resolves to Dm, and you use the notes of D dorian, and your chords are from D dorian / C Major (No #'s or b's)........ you're playing/hearing dorian.

for instance if you played over the vamp Dm7 - G7, using D dorian...... you're playing D dorian.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 19, 2009,
#6
bang,

you are really no help to this guy. maybe you should not reply to someones question because all you have are additional questions. never answer a question with a question. that is the first sign of a loser.
#7
Quote by Damius
bang,

you are really no help to this guy. maybe you should not reply to someones question because all you have are additional questions. never answer a question with a question. that is the first sign of a loser.



...irony...funny...ha..ha
#8
Quote by Damius
bang,

you are really no help to this guy. maybe you should not reply to someones question because all you have are additional questions. never answer a question with a question. that is the first sign of a loser.

Or a teacher. Or a person trying to help someone learn or reinforce their knowledge.
#9
Quote by Geldin
I am quite confused on the subject of modes and the sticky didn't answer my question directly, nor did the links (unless I'm not reading correctly). I have a working knowledge of modes, but I am seeking to expand my understanding into true music theory, not just a basic understanding.

Let's say I am playing C major (C, D, E, F, G, A, B). If I were to begin on a D and resolve to D while using that set of notes (now D, E, F, G, A, B, C), am I playing in D dorian? Assuming that I am using a progression that resolves to D, of course.

Thanks in advance for helpful comments.
I'm pretty sure you know this, but (assuming you're using the scale not just playing it straight up and down) you don't have to start on the D - you can start on any of those notes you like.
#12
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Please read the theory link in my sig and make sure you understand everything up to modes. Read the modes section, too, but you're trying to learn that now; it's not assumed that you already know it (duh).

After you've done that, please ask a specific question about what you don't understand. Ask us to reword a passage or explain a specific statement. Don't just say, "I don't get it," however.

To address your specific question, you are not necessarily playing D Dorian. Over a Dm C Dm C progression, which clearly resolves to Dm, you could throw in a B note (not chord, I hope that wasn't confusing). However, that B is simply a chromatic tone, not D Dorian.


*reported*

Edit: In response to the below post by Damius, I would like to point out that the only question mark in this post appears in the section of the post where I quote Damius.

Edit 2: While not obvious, Munky's post does not contradict mine. That Dm G7 vamp is common for D Dorian. It's the chords that determine the mode more than the lead.


Still trying top clean up the UG streets I see.

Can you ever make a post without reporting someone?
Gear
Jackson RR24M - EMG ALX w/ ABQ installed
Ibanez Xiphos - stock
LTD Alexi 600 - stock
Ibanex RG - Tone Zone(bridge), PAF Pro(neck)
Blackstar HT-20H
Fulltone OCD
MXR 10 Band EQ
#13
Quote by Damius
**reported**


Now your gonna start reporting people too???

*I'm reporting all you who keep reporting other trivial things*

TS - others have already answered you pretty well, modes are a bitch to grasp...good luck!
Gear
Jackson RR24M - EMG ALX w/ ABQ installed
Ibanez Xiphos - stock
LTD Alexi 600 - stock
Ibanex RG - Tone Zone(bridge), PAF Pro(neck)
Blackstar HT-20H
Fulltone OCD
MXR 10 Band EQ
#14
You do realize by reporting stuff you just clogg a mods email?

Only use the report button when it really is something important.