#1
Hi UG. I am currently a Junior in Highschool and I have started learning guitar from halfway through last year. I've been playing for around 5 months and my teacher has always been one to skip lessons and even today he has been delaying lessons and I cannot get any better. However I cannot get one thing out of my head. He says alot of guitar teachers are taught to or teach in a manner where they try to keep you in lessons as long as possible to earn more money; considering this is real I am afraid to find a new teacher because I want to hire a teacher so I can get good fast, and not only because I want to spend tons on money on a teacher that will slowly guide me into the path where I could have gone myself with textbooks. I play Japanese Metal and I have a great amp and two guitars my main being a PRS SE Custom, good enough until I get good at what I do, and I was wondering what I should do. I've talked to a few teachers and I could tell they are money hungry from the way they introduced themselves to me, always asking me how much I want to pay; and everything else being about time and how much things will cost and when I finally found a friendly teacher that seemed great I asked him some questions. I asked him about guitar modes and he said it was 'out of his league' to teach me about things like this because of his own skill level and the guitar teacher I have now says the style of music I like revolves around guitar modes and if I can get them down (the ionian, dorian, etc) then I will have a stable grip on my guitar neck as far as fillings in songs and solos.

So I don't know what to do; I've tried to contact all the teachers I can, but none of them seem they are willing to teach me in hopes to improve me at a faster rate, but merely for the money.

Thanks in advanced.
#3
Play the C major scale. Now, play the scale, but start on the D and end on a D. zomg, you are not playing in D Dorian.
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Oh wow this is a guitar forum!
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#4
Holy Jesus, wall of text.

But from what I undertand, drop the teacher. He's not a teacher if he keeps delaying things and not helping you at all. Get a new teacher.


/problem fixed
#6
Quote by s-g man
do you have question or what?


No, I just want suggestions.
#12
Not all teachers are "money hungry" as you put it. I've been teaching for almost 20 years, and my first priority is to teach the student what he/she wants to learn. Some students just want to learn songs. Others want to learn scales, improvization, theory, etc. Over the course of my teaching career, I've let several students go, because they either weren't practicing, or had gotten to a point where they were advanced enough to continue learning on their own.
I don't know the specifics about where you live or the availability of teachers in your area, but you should be able to find a teacher that will click with you. Start by asking a teacher his qualifications, and his method of teaching. Next you could try asking some students about their teachers.
Hope this helps.
There's my way and the wrong way.
#13
Drop Teacher + Go get Michael Miller's "Idiots Guide to Music Theory" and read it + Practice Scales and learn concepts from that + ???? = Profit.
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#14
just buy John Petrucci's lesson dvd and learn to shred
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#15
Quote by seth's daddy
Not all teachers are "money hungry" as you put it. I've been teaching for almost 20 years, and my first priority is to teach the student what he/she wants to learn. Some students just want to learn songs. Others want to learn scales, improvization, theory, etc. Over the course of my teaching career, I've let several students go, because they either weren't practicing, or had gotten to a point where they were advanced enough to continue learning on their own.
I don't know the specifics about where you live or the availability of teachers in your area, but you should be able to find a teacher that will click with you. Start by asking a teacher his qualifications, and his method of teaching. Next you could try asking some students about their teachers.
Hope this helps.

Thanks for the information. Do you have any other advice on how to find a teacher that will click with me? I found a list of teachers (around 8) from a school nearby and none of them seem to actually be interested in helping me, and always tell me to pay first. Too bad I live in california. I'd love to be your student.

As for the books; I'm not so sure. What do you think; seth? Are books good too?; I've also heard books are made like tv series episodes; to stop in the middle of an important part so you can buy the next book volume.
#17
I've had 3 teachers and one wasn't very good. He taught me stuff pretty slowly and wouldn't teach me how to read sheet music. And he always tried to get me to promote his stuff to people I knew and he recorded parts of our lessons on tape so I would have something to practice too but he'd always put hints of stuff he wanted on it, like a new Tele.

I left him after about a year and found a new guitar teacher at a local music school. He was great and taught me a lot but after 2 years we got to the point that he just didn't have anything else to teach me, as his main instrument was bass. So he gave me some recommendations and introduced me to some other guys and I wound up with my current guitar teacher, who is just incredible. My playing has improved faster than ever during my time with him.

My point from this is that you should spend your time looking around, try some music schools and if you can get some recommendations from reliable sources, that's a huge plus.
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#19
Quote by pdxhwa
Do you have any other advice on how to find a teacher that will click with me?

As for the books; I'm not so sure. What do you think; seth? Are books good too?; I've also heard books are made like tv series episodes; to stop in the middle of an important part so you can buy the next book volume.


As for your first question, make sure the teacher is into, or capable of showing you the types of things you're into. For example, a guy who only plays rock, probably wouldn't be very helpful if you're into country.
And just as in all walks of life, some teachers are just real jerks. I know a few guys that are really good players, but horrible human beings. You can usually get a feel for someone's personallity, after talking to them for a few minutes.

Books can be great if used properly. Technique is usually the biggest hurdle when it comes to learning. A book might show you the correct notes for an exercise or lick. But if you're not fingering it correctly, or if your picking technique is wrong, etc., it might take you a lot longer to learn something.
There's my way and the wrong way.
#20
Quote by Karvid
Play the C major scale. Now, play the scale, but start on the D and end on a D. zomg, you are not playing in D Dorian.

Off topic, but I have a friend who thought that if you played the C major scale over and over again, you would be better at every single aspect of the guitar.
#21
Quote by seth's daddy
As for your first question, make sure the teacher is into, or capable of showing you the types of things you're into. For example, a guy who only plays rock, probably wouldn't be very helpful if you're into country.
And just as in all walks of life, some teachers are just real jerks. I know a few guys that are really good players, but horrible human beings. You can usually get a feel for someone's personallity, after talking to them for a few minutes.

Books can be great if used properly. Technique is usually the biggest hurdle when it comes to learning. A book might show you the correct notes for an exercise or lick. But if you're not fingering it correctly, or if your picking technique is wrong, etc., it might take you a lot longer to learn something.


Ah, I see. Thanks again.

Quote by mmolteratx
I've had 3 teachers and one wasn't very good. He taught me stuff pretty slowly and wouldn't teach me how to read sheet music. And he always tried to get me to promote his stuff to people I knew and he recorded parts of our lessons on tape so I would have something to practice too but he'd always put hints of stuff he wanted on it, like a new Tele.

I left him after about a year and found a new guitar teacher at a local music school. He was great and taught me a lot but after 2 years we got to the point that he just didn't have anything else to teach me, as his main instrument was bass. So he gave me some recommendations and introduced me to some other guys and I wound up with my current guitar teacher, who is just incredible. My playing has improved faster than ever during my time with him.

My point from this is that you should spend your time looking around, try some music schools and if you can get some recommendations from reliable sources, that's a huge plus.


Thanks alot to you too. I hope I can find a teacher like yours.
#22
... If they teach you more, you pay them more, that's how it's supposed to work.

Your teacher is probably stuck up and is just too bitter to admit that he isn't as good as the rest of them.
hue
#23
What in the ****???
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#24
Well in answer to your question, i want to try and keep a student for as long as possible because it is mutually beneficial. For the student its beneficial to keep going with a teacher as you know each other and he knows your weaknesses etc and should have a plan for you. If you worked in a bank and they said you would be getting your hours cut every week because they didn't want you to work there as much then you would do what you could to make sure you can pay your bills. Students generally feel obliged to come every week but that isn't the case its just a preconception. A lot of students i have had before came every week and got burned out because 'they just wanted to learn a few tunes'.

Anyway you live in California so you shouldn't have any problems. You arent obliged to take lessons from one teacher at a time. I take webcam lessons from Greg Howe and will be starting with Chris Broderick of Megadeth soon. If you really put the effort in most of the stuff you need to know is on UG and youtube and you can go for less frequent lessons to brush up and watch out for any bad habits etc.
Last edited by Serg1 at Aug 20, 2009,
#25
^Chris is doing the webcam lessons again?
E-peen:
Rhodes Gemini
Fryette Ultra Lead
Peavey 6505
THD Flexi 50

Gibson R0 Prototype
EBMM JP13 Rosewood
Fender CS Mary Kaye

WTLT

(512) Audio Engineering - Custom Pedal Builds, Mods and Repairs
#26
Quote by mmolteratx
^Chris is doing the webcam lessons again?



well he said he would try and get some before the tour but i think that is our so i am probably not getting one until the end of the year.
#27
Quote by Serg1
Well in answer to your question, i want to try and keep a student for as long as possible because it is mutually beneficial. For the student its beneficial to keep going with a teacher as you know each other and he knows your weaknesses etc and should have a plan for you. If you worked in a bank and they said you would be getting your hours cut every week because they didn't want you to work there as much then you would do what you could to make sure you can pay your bills. Students generally feel obliged to come every week but that isn't the case its just a preconception. A lot of students i have had before came every week and got burned out because 'they just wanted to learn a few tunes'.

Anyway you live in California so you shouldn't have any problems. You arent obliged to take lessons from one teacher at a time. I take webcam lessons from Greg Howe and will be starting with Chris Broderick of Megadeth soon. If you really put the effort in most of the stuff you need to know is on UG and youtube and you can go for less frequent lessons to brush up and watch out for any bad habits etc.


I see, but there are alot of students that actually want to learn everything and become a great guitarist in the end; isn't there? Or am I just being naive?