#1
While I my guitar (Gibbo Les Paul Studio), I have been feeling a bit upset with the action. It was absolutely perfect, but after I had it taken in to get a pickup swap for Blackouts, the shop screwed with the action (who knows why) and left it higher than before.

Anyways, I've been fiddling with it for a while and had it to where it was playable. But it still wasn't as low as I would have liked it to be. Lowering action on tune-o-matic guitars is a cinch (thumbwheels ftw), but when I put the action lower, I encounter tons of dead notes on the upper frets on the low strings. I lowered the pickups to where the strings are not hitting them while fretting, so that is not the issue.

The only other option I can think of is adjusting the truss rod. How would I go about doing this? Can it fix my problem? is it easy to screw up and cause the neck to warp and become damaged?
#2
Only adjust the truss rod to correct actual neck warping. At all other times, the truss rod should simply be set to equal the string tension.

If you simply need to adjust action, you do so at the bridge and at the nut. You can have the nut cut lower or have a higher nut installed, and of course you can move the bridge upwards and downwards. You might also need to have a fret dressing to ensure that all the frets are even. That's it for action adjustments. You may also find, as many people do, that part of the problem is your idea of 'low' action is actually far lower than anyone can realistically expect. It would help if you measured the neck relief and the current string height to give a better idea of just how 'low' you think 'low' is.
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#3
Quote by MrFlibble
Only adjust the truss rod to correct actual neck warping. At all other times, the truss rod should simply be set to equal the string tension.

If you simply need to adjust action, you do so at the bridge and at the nut. You can have the nut cut lower or have a higher nut installed, and of course you can move the bridge upwards and downwards. You might also need to have a fret dressing to ensure that all the frets are even. That's it for action adjustments. You may also find, as many people do, that part of the problem is your idea of 'low' action is actually far lower than anyone can realistically expect. It would help if you measured the neck relief and the current string height to give a better idea of just how 'low' you think 'low' is.


So, considering that my guitar is not warped in the slightest, it would be prudent to avoid truss rod adjustment?