#1
ive been on youtube and i see all theese guitarist that play with feeling seeming like they use no scales at all to solo

my dad also doesnt use scales or anything to solo because he wasnt taught but the main thing i want 2 know is what do i need 2 know 2 play like that without scales even though im gonna learn them anyway lol
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#2
a well trained ear - to play with feeling you need to go beyond just knowing what notes are where to knowing exactly what to play next to achieve the sound you want - to do that you need to have a melody in your head and be able to translate it to guitar. For that you need a good ear - scales are merely a helpful framework to help you work out the intervals quicker so you can get to the right note with less effort/thought freeing up your mind for more complex ideas.
The only 6 words that can make you a better guitarist:

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#3
Learn the major scale. It's then basis of all music theory and thus every other scale. To be able to play with emotion, one must first be able to have notes that are appropriate to the emotion - for example, it is easier to play happy stuff in a major scale, not the minor scale.

Now, in order to play with emotion, you must take into account many things. Firstly, the scale you are using has an enormous impact on your playing. A major scale tends towards sounding happy. A minor scale sounds more solemn, perhaps sad. A diminished scale sounds more desperate (to me, anyway). The next thing is phrasing. To make a song sound sadder, I tend to play in the minor scale and play more slowly and emphasizing the half-steps.

Another thing to take into account is vibrato. When I think of emotional playing, I think of the blues greats, like B. B. King, playing the saddest song possible with the most beautiful vibrato they've got. On important notes, such as the root note or a longer note, you might want to think about how much vibrato to use. In sadder songs, a slower vibrato might be more appropriate, but a faster one is probably more appropriate in a faster, more upbeat song.
#4
thanks i know it will take me awhile 2 apply these but ill get it eventually
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then im soo with you






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#5
although i broadly agree that a major scale will sound happy and a minor sound sad - that is not always true - there are plenty examples of it being the other way about, minors can sound pretty funky if you know what you're doing with them.

what would help most is being able to sing - so you can translate what's in your head to music more quickly. Every great guitarist can sing, no exceptions - some just choose not to.
The only 6 words that can make you a better guitarist:

Learn theory
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#6
thanks alot doive did u go 2 colledge or something because your smart as hell
Quote by diofan88
If by knife you mean penis, and by shred you mean sex

then im soo with you






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#7
well i'm at uni now but studying natural sciences not music - there is not a lot to basic theory, most of it is reading, some of it is logic the rest is just experience :P

other people on this forum would probably disagree with you on my level of smartness, but i do know my basics
The only 6 words that can make you a better guitarist:

Learn theory
Practice better
Practice more
#8
The most important aspect of getting "feeling" is experience. Try and think ahead when playing, and really think about the notes you are choosing.

what would help most is being able to sing - so you can translate what's in your head to music more quickly.

This as well. Many people seem to get so caught up in playing the guitar they just play the notes. Try singing a tune and then playing it on the guitar.
Last edited by KillahSquirrel at Aug 20, 2009,